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Thursday, May 31, 2018

Silja Line Risteilypeli (1995)

Silja Line Risteilypeli (1995)

Ratings

3 out of 10 with 1 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

This is a promotional game for the shipping company Silja Line.

The game board is a rough map of the Baltic sea and surrounding areas. Using Route/Ship and Place of Departure cards, the players must complete as many cruises as possible; the winner is the player who reaches Stockholm or Helsinki with the most completed cruises when the Route/Ship deck runs out.

Kierto

Kierto

Ratings

3 out of 10 with 4 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Kierto (Cycle) is an educational game about recycling, designed by a group of Finnish junior high students and their teachers. The prototype won first prize in the Economic Information Office's recycling competition and was then published by EIO in cooperation with the Finnish Association for Nature Conservation.

The game board has several recycling facilities for different types of waste; each player is dealt five waste cards which they then have to deliver to the correct facilities. First one to get rid of all 5 cards is the winner. There are also event cards, which may help or hinder the players.

The die and playing pieces are wooden; the rest of the game is made of recycled paper and cardboard.

Ronin: War (2001)

Ronin: War (2001)

Ratings

5 out of 10 with 1 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
War Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Ronin is a tactical and customizable miniatures game of gigantic mechanized battle. Ronin:War introduces tanks, flying machines, and other units along with a new set of added rules to bring large-scale battle to the world of Ronin. Command your units to eliminate enemy forces, while marching your superior Ronin mechs across the battlefield for an epic showdown.

Expands:

Ronin: Duels




Turkupeli

Turkupeli

Ratings

5.76 out of 10 with 5 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

This is the Turku version of the Kaupunkipelit (City Games) series.

Kaupunkipelit is a series of games, each of which is basically a light version of Monopoly localized to a city/region of Finland. The games promote local companies, councils, educational institutes etc. and were designed as a fund raising effort for local sports clubs.

The main differences between these games and Monopoly are:

-Instead of a "street" each square on the board represents a local business.
-There are no hotels or houses, but each square has two stock cards instead of just one.
-The majority of the event cards are trivia questions about the locality the game is set in.

Other games in this series include (at least) the following:

-Helsinkipeli
-Jakobstadsspelet/Pietarsaaripeli
-Kainuupeli
-Karlebyspelet/Kokkolapeli
-Keski-Uusimaapeli
-Kotkapeli
-Kuopiopeli
-Mikkelipeli
-Porvoopeli
-Raumapeli
-Seinäjokipeli
-Suomipeli
-Turkupeli

Quick (2008)

Quick (2008)

Ratings

5.36154 out of 10 with 39 ratings
Board Game Rank: 13096

Description

Every round, each player receives a stack of 5+ hidden cards. Simultaneously, they sort them according to one or more public criteria (simplest example: higher number on top). To achieve this, a player may only use one hand, and may only hold one card in hand at any time. He may use any number of temporary stacks on the table, but the cards on table must be kept face-down all the time.

The first players who manage to accurately order their stack gain a chip. This takes them closer to victory, since the goal is to collect six chips. But for each chip you already have, you receive one more card to sort, so players behind have a good chance to catch up.

Aquarium (2011)

Aquarium (2011)

Ratings

6.02194 out of 10 with 155 ratings
Board Game Rank: 8032

Description

Aquarium offers high player interaction as the other players can – and will – use their action cards to alter the available fish that you can buy and the price that you have to pay for them.

Each player starts with a set of nine action cards and $15. The deck is shuffled, then set up with three or four "Feeding time!" cards shuffled into the deck at various points. On a turn, a player first turns up a card from the deck if the market is empty (as it is as the start of the game). Then the player looks at the fish and plant cards in the market and decides whether to pass or try to buy them. If he passes, he takes $2 from the bank and adds the top card to the market; if he wants to buy, all other players get to influence what's on the market and what the cards cost.

First, each other player chooses one of their five action cards for use in phase 1 of a buy. These cards force the active player to add, remove or swap a card from the market or simply allow the card player to make a fish swap of his own! (Players can also pass, with all action cards but the "pass" being set aside.) Second, each other player chooses one of their five action cards for use in phase 2 of a buy. These cards add or subtract 1 from the cost of the market, or double or halve the cost of the market. In the latter case, the player of the card receives money from the active player instead of those coins going to the bank.

Once the goods and the cost are set, the active player chooses to buy all the fish and plants on offer or none of them. The cost is equal to the sum of the card values, plus or minus any modifications, then doubled or halved as appropriate. All purchased cards go into a player's personal aquarium. If a player has two identical fish, he can move them to a separate breeding tank where they will earn him 1-3 coins each turn.

Each time a "Feeding time!" card is revealed, players reveal one "food cost" card at random, then pay money equal to that cost times the number of stars on fish and plants in their aquariums. Any fish not fed starve and float away to the big toilet bowl in the sky. Each plant in an aquarium reduces the food cost by one.

After the final "Feeding time!", players count the stars on their non-breeding fish, then receive bonuses for collecting all colored fish of the same size, all three sizes of fish of the same color and different varieties of plants. The player with the most stars wins.

Here, fishy, fishy, fishy...

Pyramid of Pengqueen (2008)

Pyramid of Pengqueen (2008)

Ratings

6.92909 out of 10 with 1241 ratings
Board Game Rank: 1369
Children's Game Rank: 7
Family Game Rank: 303

Description

Fluch der Mumie (Curse of the Mummy) is a game with asymmetrical goals. While one player as the Mummy tries to catch tomb raiders, the other players try to secure as many treasures as possible from the Pyramid.

The game is played with magnetic playing pieces on two sides of a vertical board, so the Mummy player cannot see the pieces of the tomb raiders. As the Mummy piece consists of two parts (one on each side of the board) the tomb raiders on the other hand know the movements of the Mummy.

They move their pieces via dice rolls and judging by the color of the tomb raiders treasure goal cards and their dice rolls, the Mummy player tries to deduce their position on the board, while they try to evade him.

When the Mummy moves over a tomb raider, he is "caught" by the Mummy magnet, thrown into the dungeon and loses some life points. The mummy wins when it earns a certain number of life points, while the tomb raiders have to secure a certain amount of treasures.
Ravensburger states that bluffing and memory also play a big part in this game.

Contents: 1 magnetic game board, 1 magnetic mummy figure (2 pieces), 4 magnetic treasure hunters (tomb raiders), 12 life points, 5 treasure hunter dice, 1 Mummy die, 23 mission cards, 2 cover tiles.

Sprocket (2008)

Sprocket (2008)

Ratings

6.24615 out of 10 with 13 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Abstract Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Try to outsmart your opponents by creating gears with the rotor pieces. When a gear is formed, a lug is added into play! The first player to add all of their lugs into play, wins the game.

But watch out! If a gear contains differing heights of stacked lugs, all players add lugs into play, so take your time in deciding which rotor to rotate and which lugs to stack. Most importantly, decide which move benefits you the most!

One Up (2008)

One Up (2008)

Ratings

6.32647 out of 10 with 17 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Abstract Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Lining up 4 bearings of the same color is the goal, but rising to the challenge involves skill and scheming! Starting with the counter at #1, each player pushes 1 bearing 1 space. the counter is them moved one up to #2. Now you must complete 2 moves. As the counter progresses from 1 to 10, the number of moves you make increases, escalating the fun and the frenzy of One Up. Can you rise to the challenge?

Gobsmacked! (2008)

Gobsmacked! (2008)

Ratings

5 out of 10 with 1 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Abstract Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Place 3 in a row of the same color or shape and your opponent scores a point in this maniacal memory game. It's enough to make your mind spin as you try to remember the pattern on the board before it's spun around and another patterned plug is added into play.

Was black on the right and whit on the left? and square below and circle above? Avoid putting 3 same pattern pieces in a row to win the game.

Contents:
1 vertical wooden board, 1 wood stand, 22 playing pieces, 2 Gobsmackers, instructions.

Fab's Quiz (2007)

Fab's Quiz (2007)

Ratings

6 out of 10 with 2 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Initially created as a joke for my girlfriend's birthday, this trivia game is real fun to play.

The game is played in teams of two players each.

One team is selected to start playing and then the game is played clock-wise.

At a team’s turn, a dice is rolled and the counter representing the team is moved half of the dice result.

Then a card is drawn and the team has to answer a question about my girlfriend (may be adapt to any person you want prior to play).

If the team answers correctly to the question, it may advance again its counter based on the result of a new dice roll.

The better you know the person, the quicker you will advance in the game.

The team that finishes first after three complete board turns is the winner of the game, and receives a "Very Best Friend Diploma".

Some special cards will add unexpected events as they are drawn :-)

Gettysburg: The Battlefield Game (1994)

Gettysburg: The Battlefield Game (1994)

Ratings

5.66667 out of 10 with 3 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Gettysburg: The Battlefield Game is a very popular game that presents an unusual look at this greatest Civil War battle, taking 2 to 6 players on a competitive "tour" of the famous battlefield. Union and Confederate players play to win, using knowledge and luck, experiencing incidents and events from the climactic three-day battle in July 1863.

The game includes a 4-part game board, a d6, six stand up figures (3 union, 3 confederate) a rule sheet, and a battle book. The battle book contains trivia questions and historic anecdotes that affect the outcome of the game.

Conniption (2008)

Conniption (2008)

Ratings

6 out of 10 with 1 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Abstract Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

From the publisher's website:

You'll be having conniption fits when the playing board is flipped upside down. Watch closely as the colored disks start tumbling into new color sequences. Will they land in winning color combinations for you, or for your opponent? Yikes!

In turn, players drop their discs down the vertical slots. But first, they must decide to flip the board before, or after, they play, creating brand new disk dilemmas.

Flip your way to 4 in a row to win.

The Gettysburg Campaign

No Image Available

Ratings

0 out of 10 with 0 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Recreates Robert E Lee's 1863 invasion of Pennsylvania using the same block game system as Worthington's previous Civil War game Forge in Fire. The game will cover the historic campaign through June and July. The Confederate player will play Lee while the Union player will play Union Commanders Joe Hooker and then George Meade. The goal of the Confederates is to capture certain import areas including if possible such cities as Baltimore and Washington.

The game itself uses a classic block game system. Strategic level play takes place on a point to point map of the Maryland and Pennsylvania countryside. Once combat is joined players will switch their counters to a battle board to conduct the tactical level combat. The units themselves are classic block game counters with a unit's strength being designated by numbers on the outside of the block which can be rotated to reflect losses in combat.

Battle for Olympus (2009)

Battle for Olympus (2009)

Ratings

5.89231 out of 10 with 39 ratings
Board Game Rank: 11636
Abstract Game Rank: 636

Description

Battle for Olympus is a two-player board game where the heroes and monsters from Greek mythology battle for control of the game board. As a piece moves it can both claim board spaces for its side and capture opposing pieces. Each piece on the tabletop also has a unique ability that they can use on their turn in place of their normal movement to affect the game in a variety of ways. Capturing a predetermined number of spaces is the goal of the game and the winner is the player to reach this goal first.

One Year War (2008)

One Year War (2008)

Ratings

5.66667 out of 10 with 3 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
War Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Based on famous Japanese animation series "Mobile suit Gundam".
This game covers the whole of one year war in the TV series.
This game contains all important episode and characters and weapons in not only "Mobile suit Gundam" but also in "08 Mobile suits platoon", "War in a pocket" and "Stardust Memory".

The game components contains
700 units
2 map (1 space, 1 global)
96 weapon cards
several play aids
rulebook

The game is played with one half-month game turn which is further divided into 2 action cycles. Thus, each cycle represents 1 week.

An important subject of one year war is weapon development. This is represented by technology level and weapon development cards. Every weapon need specific technology level and in some case its predecessor weapon which must be developed earlier.

This game has 2 scenarios
1) Campaign scenario, whole 1 year war, 20+ hours
2) TV series scenario, last 4 months, 8 hours

Soccero (first edition) (2007)

Soccero (first edition) (2007)

Ratings

6.82143 out of 10 with 14 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

From the official website:

"Soccero is the football boardgame that delivers the most exciting and realistic football experience! The game consists of two players or managers moving the player figures and the ball on the game board using dice. The player who has scored more goals by the end of the game wins. The game is designed to serve the skilled and strategic mind - but just as in real football, luck can always bring an unexpected challenge!

The Basic Rules make it easy and fun to get into the game. Later the managers may choose to follow the Extended Rules. The extended rules will add more realistic football features to the game turning it more challenging. The extended rules contain special situations such as goal kick, corner kick, throw-in, free kicks and penalty kick."

Re-implements

Die wilden Fussballkerle: Das dampfhammerharte Fussball-Spiel




Re-implemented in:

Soccero (second edition)




Housing Drive (1948)

Housing Drive (1948)

Ratings

7 out of 10 with 5 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

'Housing Drive' is a board game published by Pepys Games of London in the 1940's.
2-6 players race to complete a housing estate using the least government subsidy possible. Houses are built by, first, obtaining a "Licence to Build" and then blue, red and green counters, representing respectively Units of Labour, Units of Material and Units of Power.Players may trade counters to complete their housing estates. Each player is provided with a Playing Board representing a Housing Estate and indicating positions for the various pieces used during the game.

In the 1940's this was a topical subject for a board game as the British government was replacing housing stock destroyed by the Luftwaffe and also trying to provide more 'Homes fit for heroes'

The game is notable for the quality of its components - metal dice, counters, coins, good quality wooden houses and Playing Boards - at a time when rationing was still in place and raw materials were at a premium.

At some time the box was enlarged, and the rules were subsequently enlarged from 2 to 3 pages. Parts of some rules were rewritten, and explanations of some rules expanded. Two new paragraphs were added at the end. One was headed, "Housing Drive, Shorter Version". The other was headed "Housing Drive, Simplified Version", described as "a simple game for young children."

A player who completes the game and has no Government Subsidy debited against him/her is the winner. If two players qualify, the one who has built the most houses wins. If all players have Government Subsidies debited against them, then "the player whose Government Subsidy per House is the lowest is the winner."

Incidentally, the front of the game describes it as being for 2 to 8 players, although the rules and pieces are clearly for 2 to 6 players (e.g. there are only 6 playing boards). At some time a red sticker was placed on the enlarged box correcting the error.

Meklari

Meklari

Ratings

3.6875 out of 10 with 8 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Very Monopoly-like Finnish (only?) business game. Roll & move, buy or pay, sell, win or declare bankrupt.

Components
A board, eight building sets, 120 notes with different values, 100 action and block cards, car-shaped player markers and a dice.

Rules
Players roll dice and move around the board illustrating a small town with eight blocks for houses and shops, kiosks, train stations and gas stations, two blocks for each. In the corners of the board there are a bank, a police station, a school and a factory. These involve action cards players must pick if they stop on the corresponding square.

Players can buy free blocks from the bank when entering one (they can also negotiate themselves to buy and sell their own blocks). If the entered block is already taken, they have to pay rent for the owner. To increase the rent of the blocks, players can build them with corresponding buildings. Each building consists of 4-6 small wooden part. A house can be built as soon as a player has a block for it. To build other buildings, one has to own both of the blocks of that serie (say, both shop blocks). Buildings can be bought part by part, but only finished buildings increase the rent (one exception: houses without roofs increase the rent also).

Player can own only two blocks for houses, other blocks as many as they want. Furthermore, player can build only one house. Since the number of shops, kiosks and both stations is also limited to one, player has to decide on which of the blocks he/she wants to build. The buildings cannot be later moved.

If a player can't pay rent or other payments, he/she can sell his/her building blocks back to the bank and take mortages on empty blocks (these blocks don't give any income for the owner). If this wont bring enough cash, the player makes a bankruptcy and is out of the game. All blocks are returned to the bank and they are free to buy for other players.

Last player in game is the winner.

Rule variations for two players
Both players can own several house blocks and build two houses.

Rice Wars (2008)

Rice Wars (2008)

Ratings

5.35303 out of 10 with 195 ratings
Board Game Rank: 14132

Description

Become The Daimyo – a head of a Japanese noble house and clash in battle with your power-hungry opponents.

Rice Wars is the economic strategy game set in the XIV-century Japan. Game is suggested for 2-5 players aged 8 years and up.

The goal of the game is to manage the resources of the small island of Tokuno and take control of its rice fields. Get the peasants to work for you in the fields, fend off the envious neighbours by sending your ashigaru troops, lend an ear to Imperial Advisors and hire the ronin who can challenge the opposing daimyo to the noble duel to the death.

The game contains a two-sided board allowing the players to choose two variants of the game. The simple board is designed for fast-paced play for 2-4 players, while the epic board allows longer and more intricate game for 3-5 players.

Enter the world of medieval Japan and fight for victory!

The game includes:

- the board
- 144 tokens
- 55 cards
- 26 wooden markers
- 8 advisor cards
- 5 daymio cards
- ryo banknotes
- the rulebook.

Madagascar 1942 (2008)

Madagascar 1942 (2008)

Ratings

7.57143 out of 10 with 7 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
War Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Solitaire wargame included in Panzerschreck Anthology.

The player controls an invasion force of 7 British units that must control an unknown quantity of Vichy French held positions around the north coast of Madagascar by the end of the 5th turn.

Victory conditions are determined by random die roll at the end of the game, but either Diego Suarez and/or Antsirane must be in British hands by the end of the last turn.

All 9 objectives are held by the Vichy French units at the beginning of the game. These units are deployed face down and may be reinforced due to events.

Counters:

1 Turn marker
7 British units (Combat-Morale-Movement)
1 Royal Navy marker
19 Vichy French units (Combat-Morale-Movement)

Game includes unmounted, colour counters, 8.5" x 11" hex map, optional rules, optional historical French set-up, and designer's notes.

Spanish Armada (2005)

Spanish Armada (2005)

Ratings

4 out of 10 with 2 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

"Solo card game using a regular deck of cards. Based on the Failure of the Spanish Armada to invade England in 1588. The Armada had 122 Ships. The English 66. The English sank 2 Spanish Ships and were able to disperse the Armada. The dispersed Armada drifted into the North Sea and had to circle around Ireland in treacherous weather to return home. On the journey home 39 transports foundered or ran aground."

The deck is split into two halves, the red half (Spanish Armada) and the black half (English Squadrons). Each turn has two phases, a Straggler Phase and an Engagement Phase. The player must use his English raider ships to disperse Spanish stragglers, which are then placed in the player's Victory Pile. The victory conditions set the level of success or failure based on the number of cards in the Victory Pile after the Spanish Armada Deck has been exhausted.

Star Trek RPG Solo Card and Dice Game (2002)

Star Trek RPG Solo Card and Dice Game (2002)

Ratings

3.96 out of 10 with 5 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

A simple solitaire game portraying adventure and exploration in a number of Star Trek milieus.

Designer's Description: "I always had a soft spot in my heart for Roddenberry's Utopian Star Trek. A veteran of the FASA STAR TREK RPG, The adventures I loved the most were the basic explore, first contact, go where no man has gone before on a Constitution Class Star Ship. This game captures that feel. Although I loved the FASA game, I am trying to be progressive, so I have used a VERY SIMPLIFIED system based off the new Decipher Star Trek RPG."

"You will need 2 six-sided dice and a card deck composed of the STAR TREK CARD LIST below. I have also included a STAR TREK: THE NEXT GENERATION CARD LIST, STAR TREK: THE MOTION PICTURES CARD LIST, STAR TREK: THE ADVENTURES OF CAPTAIN SULU! CARD LIST and the crew from the ENTERPRISE-B in a STAR TREK:
GENERATIONS CARD LIST (give Capt. Harriman a chance; he's just green)."

Space Hole (2001)

Space Hole (2001)

Ratings

5.66667 out of 10 with 3 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

"Solo Dice & Card game. The player must defend and build up his Space colony."

The game uses a custom card deck containing four types of cards: Events, Invaders, Defenders, and Structures. Each Structure card is rated for power use, number of defender cards supported, and Mega-credits generated. Defender and Invader cards have Force values. Events represent good and bad happenings in the game.

If the player's Base is destroyed, the game ends and the player loses. Otherwise the player attempts to have as many Mega-credits as possible once the last card has been drawn from the deck.

Solitaire Conquest (2002)

Solitaire Conquest (2002)

Ratings

6.33333 out of 10 with 3 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

"Solitaire board and card game with a fantasy conquest theme." The object of the game is to eliminate all of the Hordes from the continent.

The map depicts a continent made up of twelve connected regions. Each region is large enough to hold a stack of cards. Cards from the Foe Deck are dealt equally into eleven of the regions. These stacks are known as the Hordes. The player starts in the vacant region with a force drawn from the Ally Deck.

Rift Rats (2005)

Rift Rats (2005)

Ratings

0 out of 10 with 0 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Rift Rats is the nickname given to an elite group of Starliner Captains who navigate rifts in the space-time continuum delivering prospectors to landing zones throughout the galaxy (d’ers dilithium in d’em d’er planets). In an effort to deter future prospectors, tribes of native species from these planets have built a defensive network inside the rifts known as the Rat Trap. How good of a starship pilot are you? Think you can survive the 'Rat Trap'?"

The designer notes: "Many solo games offer a very limited course of actions, require very little thought or strategy and are overly dependent on luck. Rift Rats attempts to challenge solo players and provide a variety of different situations."

A solo or multi-player game. The object is to deliver seven passenger pods to seven landing zones, or to be the first to do so in a multi-player game.

Gates (2008)

Gates (2008)

Ratings

0 out of 10 with 0 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Abstract Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

A connection game played on a triangular board made up of hexagonal cells. The object is connect the three sides of the board by a continuous path. Pieces are hexagonal tiles that contain both players' colors. Players alternate turns, placing a tile in one of three possible orientations on a board hexagon.

The game now comes in several different rule-set flavors, including one called "Hex Gate" in which, as in Hex, players try to connect their own sides of the board with a continuous path of their own color

Market

No Image Available

Ratings

0 out of 10 with 0 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

A type of poker game which involves bidding on cards
Each player will bid with a limited amount of money on faceup cards for his hand. At the end of the round, who ever has the highest hand wins. The hand rankings are as follows:
1 pair
3 card straight
3 card flush
2 pair
3 card straight-flush
4 card straight
4 card flush
3 of a kind
5 card straight
5 card flush
full house
double 3-of-a-kind
four of a kind
5 card straight flush

Shako (1999)

Shako (1999)

Ratings

7.16667 out of 10 with 3 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Abstract Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Shako which means Chess in Esperanto, is a chess variant played on a 10X10 board. This variant uses all the rules of orthodox chess, and the way the pieces are placed in the opening setup, again in the familiar pattern, allow players to follow practical all the openings used for orthodox chess. The new pieces are taken from Xiangqi (Chinese Chess).

Elephants are added on the outside of the rooks. Elephants move one or two squares diagonally. When an elephant moves two squares, it is allowed to jump.

the two ranks of pieces are moved up, so sit as they would on an 8X8 board. the rank closest to the player is empty except for two cannons on the outer most squares.

Cannons move without taking like rooks, and they move with taking by going in a straight horizontal and vertical line and jumping over exactly one piece: when a cannon takes a piece, there must be exactly one piece between the original and final square of the cannons move - this piece may be of either color. (This is identical to the move of the cannon in Xiangqi.)

Other pieces move as normal. Win is by checkmate

Drunken Coachman (1930)

Drunken Coachman (1930)

Ratings

5 out of 10 with 1 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

"... the Amusing Game played in Naval Messes." This is a small box card game where the goal is to move the Coachman figure between players using the cards dealt to you at the beginning of the game (they move the card a certain number of players left or right". If a stop if played you lose a chit from your stock (you star with twelve) to the centre. A "fares please" card gets you one stock counter from each player. The person who has the Coachman in Front of them at the end wins the chits from the centre. You play to a set total score or until all but one player is eliminated. The original game makes you play your cards without looking at them but a suggested variant of playing from your hand make it more interesting. This is one of a number of light English Card Games created during the 1930's. There is no publisher, author or date on the game.

Second World War at Sea: Coral Sea (2010)

Second World War at Sea: Coral Sea (2010)

Ratings

6.95591 out of 10 with 66 ratings
Board Game Rank: 7000
War Game Rank: 1324

Description

In May 1942, the Japanese sought to capture Port Moresby on the south coast of New Guinea and interrupt communications between the United States and Australia. Such a move, they hoped, would bring the Americans to battle.

The United States Navy needed no special inducement to fight its nation's enemies. Two American aircraft carriers met one small and two large Japanese carriers in the world's first battle between these powerful new warships. For the first time in naval history, a major battle was decided with no warship of either fleet even sighting an enemy ship directly. Aircraft were the new measure of naval power.

Coral Sea is the new introductory boxed game for the Second World War at Sea series. It covers this key battle and is intended as a gateway for players new to the world's most popular series of naval boardgames. The Japanese player must establish new bases in New Guinea and at Tulagi in the Solomon Islands; the American player must stop them. Forces are very closely balanced, and victory will rest with the player who can best make use of his or her resources.

The 22x17-inch operational map covers the Coral Sea off northeastern Australia as well as surrounding waters. Players maneuver their task forces on this map and search for one another with aircraft, submarines and surface ships. When contact is made, player moves to the tactical map.

The tactical map is a generic blue field of hexagons, used to resolve surface combat. There, ships maneuver and fight using their gunnery and torpedo factors. Each player rolls a number of dice according to the ship’s capabilities, hitting on a result of 6. Gunnery and torpedo damage tables give the results: ships can suffer damage to engines, hull or armament. Air attacks are resolved in similar fashion. The combat systems yield results rapidly but in a historically accurate fashion, giving a good balance of fun and insight.

Roma Defendenda Est (2008)

Roma Defendenda Est (2008)

Ratings

3.5 out of 10 with 2 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
War Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

This solitaire or two players game offers a series of “what ifs”, based on the historical situation following the Italian Armistice, signed 8th of September 1943. Starting from the historical position of the Italian and German divisions, one player, as the Italian, must try to save Rome from falling in German hands before the arrival of the American reinforcements through the air. But this game can also be played with a German opponent, or from the German perspective, with a single player try to reach the Eternal City before the American air transported units.

El juego de la Luna (1890)

El juego de la Luna (1890)

Ratings

0 out of 10 with 0 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

A very simple roll-and-move game. Players roll a die and move their playing pieces through the board spaces, in some of which there is a humanized Moon in one of their phases (full, new, first quarter and last quarter). Depending on which phase of the Moon the players fall, they stay where they are, advance additional spaces or go back to previous spaces.

Note: The current info on the game is scarce and not fully accurate, as it dates from 1890. If anyone has additional information and more accurate data, please provide it.

Armchair Generals (1991)

Armchair Generals (1991)

Ratings

7.05 out of 10 with 2 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
War Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Armchair Generals is a grand strategy war game that puts you in charge of one of the major sides in either WWII or in a, hypothetical, WWIII scenario. Each side consists of a number of different troop types, including armies, fleets and air forces.

The playing board is two sided, with maps of the world on each side. On one side is the world as it was in 1939 and is used for the four player version of the game (WWII). The other side is a map of the world as it was in the late 1980s and is used for two and three player games (WWIII).

In the two player game one player takes the role of NATO and the other takes on the role of the Warsaw Pact. For the three player game the third player dons the mantle of China. The four player game is based on WWII and each player controls either Japan, USSR, the Western Allies or the Axis Powers.

The object of the game is to be the first player to grab a set number of economic 'points' and thus, dominate your opponents.

Orion Emperor (2008)

Orion Emperor (2008)

Ratings

8 out of 10 with 1 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

This Orion Emperor is 4X game designed in the spirit of Master of Orion series for PC. The players take roles of leaders of the different races and factions and start to develop their newly founded space empires via exploring the space, making political decisions, managing of their parliament and preparing against all the possible encounters the game provides and of course against the other players who happen to share the same interest to rule the whole galaxy.

The essence of the game is your own parliament which needs constant management by strong leader to make sure the parliament makes the right decisions for the future of your empire. As your power and respect grows during the game, with careful planning your empire's parliament suddenly is making just the decisions their strong leader wants...but then also starts to happen the first contacts to other players which surely will open a can of worms of new challenges.

Orion Emperor (play test name: Master of Orion IV) has been under development for 2 years. The newest release is the 4th edition of Orion Emperor.

Thunderbirds: The Board Game (1999)

Thunderbirds: The Board Game (1999)

Ratings

3.92 out of 10 with 10 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

"Your mission is to save as many lives as possible, only, like Jeff Tracy you are never sure where you will be needed next so you must try and be ready for anything...anywhere!"

Roll and move game played on a hex-based map where players attempt to complete missions [usually along the lines of "take x piece of equipment [cards] to y location [on map]"]. The game is based on Gerry Anderson's hit 1960's British television show, Thunderbirds.

Panzer Grenadier: Secret Weapons (2008)

Panzer Grenadier: Secret Weapons (2008)

Ratings

7.56429 out of 10 with 28 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
War Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

From the Avalanche Press website:

Science fiction became reality during the Second World War, as scientists and engineers labored madly to bring bizarre new weapons to the battlefield. Panzer Grenadier: Secret Weapons is a 64-page book supplement to the popular Panzer Grenadier series, looking at some of these laboratory products — all of which existed at least on the drawing board, and many of which actually saw service.

Origins Award winning author John R. Phythyon Jr. tells of odd programs like Germany's super-heavy tanks — vehicles like the 180-ton Maus tank and the equally huge Tiger III. None of those actually saw combat, but the world's first anti-tank guided missile, the German X7, apparently did.

Britain's huge tanks are also covered, with the slow and heavy Tortoise and the slow and heavy Black Prince. And there's the awesome Centurion, a design so solid it remains in service in some of the world's armies more than six decades later.

Plus we have flying machines. There are German Fl.282 helicopters (in three versions), Fa.223 helicopters (also in three versions) and the huge Fa.284 helicopter. Plus the P.1003 tilt-rotor aircraft, ancestor of the modern-day Osprey. Finally, German jets make an appearance to lend close support, including the Me.1099 attack plane fitted with a 55mm automatic cannon.

And there's more. The Americans get their Sikorsky R4 reconnaissance helicopter, while the Japanese receive the Ka-1 autogyro. For every Panzer Grenadier fan who's asked for weird science, this is exactly what you've wanted.

Qyshinsu: Mystery of the Way (2008)

Qyshinsu: Mystery of the Way (2008)

Ratings

6.77237 out of 10 with 76 ratings
Board Game Rank: 7491
Abstract Game Rank: 321

Description

BOARD: there are twelve triangles on the surface of the circular board. Only one stone may reside on a space.

STONES: There are a total of 24 stones (12 red & 12 black). Each player chooses one color, red or black. There is one pair of six different kinds of stones for a total of 12 stones per player. They vary in kind:


Stone of 1
Stone of 2
Stone of 3
Stone of 4
Stone of 5
"Old Stone"


MOVEMENT: There are only two actions a player can perform - placing or removing a stone from the board.

RULES: When you place a stone in a space on the board, your opponent must place or remove one of their stones (# of spaces - according to the value of the stone you placed) away from your stone in either direction on the board - to the right or left of your stone. The same rule applies when removing a stone - the logic is the same.

The "Old Stone" is unique. When placing this stone, your opponent MUST place a stone in the nearest vacant space to it. When removing this stone, your opponent MUST remove their nearest stone to it.

ADDITIONAL RULES ("The Precepts"):


First Precept: players are not allowed to touch each others stones.
Second Precept: only two of each kind of stone is allowed on the board at the same time.
Third Precept: when you remove a stone from a space, that same kind of stone may not be put back in that same space on your very next turn.


OBJECTIVE: "Return to the Way":

This occurs when your opponent is unable to place or remove a stone.

The Game of Life: Indiana Jones (2008)

The Game of Life: Indiana Jones (2008)

Ratings

5.34725 out of 10 with 69 ratings
Board Game Rank: 13216
Children's Game Rank: 406

Description

This re-theme of The Game of Life is part of the May 2008 wave of Indiana Jones product timed to capitalize on the release of Indiana Jones & The Kingdom of the Crystal Skull. This particular game is available exclusively through Target.

Pow-Wow-Opoly (2007)

Pow-Wow-Opoly (2007)

Ratings

0 out of 10 with 0 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

This is a culture-based variant of Monopoly. The game has an Aboriginal powwow theme, allowing players to learn a bit about the culture as they play.

From the game's website "My vision of this game is that it educates the general public and inquiring minds about what a Pow-Wow is and how it is an expression of our culture as First Nations People. It has also been my vision to see our culture in a format that is fun and accessible to all people, to share the little idiosyncrasies that make us “Indian”. After playing Pow-Wow-Opoly you will know what an Indian Taco is or that we always carry a little duct tape in our “Indian Car” for quick repair jobs on our travels; we usually have a spare blanket in the trunk and an extra hand drum just in case."

The website is www.pow-wow-opoly.com

Monopoly: Prince Caspian (2008)

Monopoly: Prince Caspian (2008)

Ratings

4.5 out of 10 with 2 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

C.S. Lewis' book "Prince Caspian: The Return to Narnia" merges with the world-famous board game Monopoly.

Great War at Sea: Pacific Crossroads (2010)

Great War at Sea: Pacific Crossroads (2010)

Ratings

7.23022 out of 10 with 46 ratings
Board Game Rank: 7696
War Game Rank: 1435

Description

During the first half of the 20th century, the United States and the Japanese Empire constantly made plans for a naval war against the other rising power. Each believed that the U.S. Navy would fight its way across the Pacific Ocean, with important clashes taking places in island chains like the Marianas and the Carolines.

Pacific Crossroads is the new introductory boxed game for the Great War at Sea series. It's based on the actual plans of both the United States and Japan for naval conflict at the close of World War I and immediately afterwards. Players try to seize and hold bases to either enable or stop the American drive across the Pacific.

While the game is intended for new players, there's plenty here for old salts, too. New ships like the American 1910 battle cruiser design are present, as are the battle cruisers the Americans feared Japan would acquire from the Royal Navy. There's a lot of naval warfare in this small package, which also ushers in a new edition of the series rules.

The 22x17-inch operational map covers waters around the Mariana and Caroline Islands and the coast of northern New Guinea. Players maneuver their fleets on this map and search for one another with aircraft, submarines and surface ships. When contact is made, player moves to the tactical map.

The tactical map is a generic blue field of hexagons, used to resolve surface combat. There, ships maneuver and fight using their gunnery and torpedo factors. Each player rolls a number of dice according to the ship’s capabilities, hitting on a result of 6. Gunnery and torpedo damage tables give the results: ships can suffer damage to engines, hull or armament. The combat systems yield results rapidly but in a historically accurate fashion, giving a good balance of fun and insight.

Monopoly: The Portable Property Trading Game (1994)

Monopoly: The Portable Property Trading Game (1994)

Ratings

4.70556 out of 10 with 108 ratings
Board Game Rank: 14989

Description

A very small travel version of Monopoly which often comes in the shape of a red suitcase and plays very similarly to the original game. One difference is that it contains three dice. The Community Chest and Chance cards are replaced with tables. Three dice are rolled and the tables are referenced to find the result.

The Waddington's UK edition has different properties than the U.S. version, and also comes in a different sort of case with a magnetic board and magnetic hotels, houses, and movers.

The Horde (2004)

The Horde (2004)

Ratings

0 out of 10 with 0 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

A card game based on the vintage Crystal Dynamics fantasy computer game of the same name. The game is played with two custom decks, a Recruit Deck and a Horde Deck. The Horde Deck is composed of Hordlings, the creatures that make up the Horde. The Recruit Deck includes forces which the player will use to combat the Hordlings.

The takes on the role of Chauncey, who must hold off the Horde for five years, battling the Hordlings in a predetermined series of locations, including the Shimto Plains, Fetid Swamps of Buuzal, Tree Realm of Alburga, Kar-Nyar Desert, and Frozen Wastes of Vesh.

"Victory: You (Chauncey) are killed if all 4 Grimthwacker cards are in the Recruit Discard Pile. You lose if you are ever unable to play your taxes. You win if you survive all 5 years (=20 turns)."

Troll Trouble (2005)

Troll Trouble (2005)

Ratings

0 out of 10 with 0 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

"The dark order of wizards have been bickering over who has the most gifted house elf. They have decided to organize a contest and send their naughty little house elves into an old mine to retrieve the magical golden egg of Eddenburg. The 1st elf to return to the Mine Entrance with the golden egg wins."

"The hen that lays the golden eggs is protected by a giant and his body guards (a family of rock-hard ugly trolls). The giant and his bodyguards have been living in this same little mine shaft for over 300 years. Now as you can imagine the mine is really disgusting, there are germs everywhere, and not only germs but super germs. These super germs can cause diarrhea in house elves. As you can imagine it is hard for an elf to ride in the mine carts and sneak around quietly without their Pepto Bismo."

"As far as combat the trolls certainly have an advantage over the elves in strength, but they are stupid and sometimes completely forget who they are and what they are. They begin to waddle and walk around in circles mumbling to themselves. If these trolls had a brain they would be really dangerous."

"Another interesting aspect of trolls is that when they see an elf they drool, and when I say drool I really mean drool. Because of this it is really difficult for an elf to sneak around because they are tracking mucus around on the bottoms of their boots, not to mention it is really slippery. On the positive side when a troll captures a house elf and drools all over it, it can become very slippery and sometimes
it can squirm and slip free."

"Two other techniques house elves have learned that are effective against trolls. First, trolls can't stand elves that squeak and second, trolls are particularly self conscious when elves flash them."

Swiss Family Robinson (2005)

Swiss Family Robinson (2005)

Ratings

0 out of 10 with 0 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

"Solo Board, Dice, and Card Game. You control the Swiss Family Robinson. A Group of Pirates is attacking your Rocky Redoubt."

The game uses a chess board or other 8x8 grid and a set of custom cards. Six pieces are used to represent the family members, classified as three grown men, two women, and a child. Sixteen pawns are used to represent the pirates.

Each pirate moves 0-2 spaces toward the family members each turn, as determined by random die roll. The cards are played to cause the family members to attack the pirates.
"Victory: Drive off all of the Pirates and keep the Family Members from being captured."

Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Africa (2001)

Africa (2001)

Ratings

0 out of 10 with 0 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

A solo card game of exploration and conquest in Africa. Playable solo, or with two or three players.

The game is played with three custom card decks, the Province Deck, Unit Deck and Event Deck. There Province Deck has cards for eight provinces, each rated for income and defense. The Event Deck contains favorable and cataclysmic events.

The Unit Deck has Native, Colonial, European, and Rebel Armies. The Rebel Armies represent the forces the player must eliminate from the provinces. The player must pay upkeep for all friendly armies in the provinces.

The player may also build settlements, towns, and forts in a province. These installations alter the income or defense values of a province.

Ypres (2001)

Ypres (2001)

Ratings

4.66667 out of 10 with 3 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

"Card game of Western Front Battle 1915 (solo or 2 players)"

Each player has two custom decks, Officer and Unit Decks. The players also share a common Modifier Deck. Each player also uses ten-sided dice as casualty markers to track their troop casualties. Ten terrain markers used to track victory points.

"The side that loses his troops loses the game. The player that first possesses 10 Terrain markers wins the game."

Basic Impetus (2006)

Basic Impetus (2006)

Ratings

7.18077 out of 10 with 26 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
War Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Basic Impetus is the fast-play version of the Impetus set of wargames rules, published by Dadi & Piombo.

This is a set of rules designed for playing battles in the Ancient, Medieval, and Renaissance periods.

The rules are designed for fast play, using relatively small armies - you can fight a battle in 60-90 minutes using forces of 7-10 elements a side.

The game can be played using various scales of figures: 6mm, 10mm, 15mm, 20mm, and 25/28mm.

Figures are based in elements with frontages of 60mm, 80mm, or 120mm wide (depending on figure scale).

The rules and army lists for the game are free to download and are fully supported by Dadi & Piombo. There are currently army lists available for 34 different periods of history - anything from Ancient Egypt through Alexander the Great, the rise and fall of Rome, the Dark Ages, the Crusades, the various conflicts of Medieval Europe, and the wars of China, Korea, and Japan.

Huuue! (2008)

Huuue! (2008)

Ratings

5.82037 out of 10 with 54 ratings
Board Game Rank: 11576

Description

A new horse-racing game, driven by card play. For each race, different horses are identified as favourites or laggards. You get more victory points for a bad horse finishing well than for a favourite winning the race. Players use cards from their hand to select which horses move forward and backward by different places. There is no race track. Instead, markers for each horse are re-ordered on the table as needed. This allows horses to run neck and neck, which affects how they move in later goes. Players secretly bet on their choice before each race and try to manipulate the result to their favour. After a few races, the most VPs wins.

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