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Saturday, April 30, 2016

Dynamo: Dunkirk, 1940 (1986)

Dynamo: Dunkirk, 1940 (1986)

Ratings

6.93667 out of 10 with 45 ratings
Board Game Rank: 7392
War Game Rank: 1463

Description

(from The Wargamer Magazine 53:)

Dynamo: Dunkirk, 1940 is a strategic/operational-level simulation of the decisive middle phase of the battle for France. The first phase ended when the tanks of Panzergruppe Kleist emerged unscathed from the western end of the Ardennes Forest on 14 May, thus unhinging the entire Allied strategic plan. The third phase began on June 5, when the final drives into the heart of France were begun. For two weeks at the end of May, the Allies had a final chance to rebalance the situation. Had they succeeded in stabilizing a supplied bridgehead on the Flanders coast, or managed to smash the thinly-spread German mechanized formations while breaking out southward, all of subsequent World War II history would have been changed. Alternately, had the Germans succeeded in bagging the whole of the B.E.F., there would have been little or nothing to stop an Operation Sealion and no troops to send to North Africa.

Game has a 12 turn Campaign scenario, and a 7/5 turn "No Halt Order" scenario to examine the ramifications of Hitler's mistake. The ratio of playing area to unit quantity creates high-density combat and fluid gameplay situations. The simulation is at the intermediate level of complexity, and suitable for solitaire play

Firefight (1976)

Firefight (1976)

Ratings

5.78117 out of 10 with 180 ratings
Board Game Rank: 9681
War Game Rank: 2174

Description

Firefight: Game of US/Soviet Tactical Combat, A tactical game of modern (late 1970's) mechanized combat, partly funded by the US Army as a training tool, to show the effects of the long range and lethality of modern weapons on the techniques and tactics of the modern battlefield.

Game components: 400 die cut counters, two 22" x34" geomorphic maps, rules booklet, briefing booklet.

Game Scale:
Game Turn: 40 seconds
Hex: 54 yards / 50 meters
Units: Fireteams & Individual Vehicles

Game Inventory:
Two 22 x 34" four color mapsheets
One dual-side printed countersheet (400 1/2" counters)
One 20-page Firefight rulebook
One 20-page Reference Data booklet
Two 6-sided dice

Solitaire Playability: Medium
Complexity Level: Medium
Players: 1 or more
Playing Time: 2-6 hours


(from the original SPI flat tray and z-pack cover sheet:)

Modern US and Soviet Small Unit Tactics

An Historical Simulation Game
the time is: The First Battle of the Next War


Two separate 22" x 34" maps in four colors
Terrain and target sensitive CRT's
Individual, sequenced fire and movement


Firefight is game which highlights the dynamics of the modern battlefield. Each unit represents either one vehicle or one "fireteam" (four infantrymen).

The game scale is 50 meters per hex and 40 seconds per Game-Turn. Each Game-Turn is comprised of a Fire Phase, followed by a Movement Phase, during which the players alternate moving units (those that have not fired), and terminating with an Indirect Fire Phase, during which the players employ and assess fire from off-map artillery and mortar units.

Firefight makes extensive use of tables to express the strength of a firing unit against a particular target at a given distance. This strength (or firepower rating) is then referred to a Combat Results Table. This procedure allows us to rate different weapon systems versus different target types with much greater accuracy than heretofore. Another innovation is the integration of the terrain effects directly onto the CRT's. Results are colour-coded to graphically display the protection offered by woods, building and defilade (hull-down) positions. The whole effect is a much simpler, but more accurate system of combat.

Firefight is presented in three stages. Firefight I, II and III. Firefight I introduces the player to the fundamental game system. Firefight II introduces more complex rules, which add realistic effects yo play. Firefight III explores the effects of weapons systems presently under development.


(from the SPI soap box cover:)

Modern US and Soviet Small Unit Tactics

A Fascinating Future-History Simulation Game
the time is: The First Battle of the Next War

What if the US and USSR were to meet in a conventional war? Firefight highlights the dynamics of today's battlefield and includes an intensive survey of battlefield tactics and doctrine. The range and lethality of weapons in each country's service are contrasted as players use the tactical deployment of their combined arms system to test the capabilities of their small tactical units. Firefight simulates this possible conflict on a map based on US Army specifications of probable terrain conditions. Colorful cardboard playing pieces move, position, and engage for battle through a superimposed hexagonal grid, which functions like a chessboard's squares. Simple probability charts determine each combat's outcome.

Contains: comprehensive historical situation briefing; 20 page rules booklet; 400 die-cut cardboard playing pieces; two different 22" x 34" soft map sections; and various playing aids.

Level of Complexity: Moderate
Average Playing Time: 2 hours
Suitability for Solitaire Play: Moderate

Newsmaker (1996)

Newsmaker (1996)

Ratings

4.25 out of 10 with 12 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

3 different rules for this game. Your are a newspaper publisher. Your goal is to publish a lot of different, expensive newspapers in low time.

Triple Crown (1982)

Triple Crown (1982)

Ratings

5.5 out of 10 with 2 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Pick your horse to Win, Place, or Show.

Players note secretly whether their horse will, place or show and collect betting tickets before rolling one of three dice and move their horse accordingly. Low payout for fast dice, high payout for slow dice.

The game has two repetitions of three races: short, medium and long. Short is one dash down the straight. Medium is one turn and one straight. Long is one full run around the track.

Nach dem Regen (1995)

Nach dem Regen (1995)

Ratings

6.13889 out of 10 with 18 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Abstract Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

This looks like a childrens game. But it is an strategic game. Place the mushrooms on the gameboard. Up to four on each turn. The mushrooms have different colours. If all 4 colours are in line you earn points. It does not matter if there are free spaces in that line. Player with the most points wins.

Nobody is Perfect (1992)

Nobody is Perfect (1992)

Ratings

6.93088 out of 10 with 510 ratings
Board Game Rank: 2079
Party Game Rank: 101

Description

This is a party game. Each player draws a card with a complicated word or technical term on it, with the meaning of that word given on the card as well, but only visible to himself. Everyone then invents two alternative meanings for their word and writes them down along with the correct answer. After that, each player reads out his word and asks everyone to choose between the three answers. All players then place a token on the answer they think is correct.

Everyone who is right gets points. If a player made up such a "realistic" answer that people believed him even if it's not the correct meaning, he also gets points.

There are also cards with pictures on them, but you do the same with those. The one who reaches the end of the track on the game board first wins.

Quattro Schach (2002)

Quattro Schach (2002)

Ratings

6 out of 10 with 2 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Abstract Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Quattro Schach literally means "Four Chess", indicating that it is a chess game for four players. However, there are some variations in this version which are immediately apparent when looking at the board.

The board is 14x14 squares and has a variety of coloured spaces. In the middle are four squares, each of a player's colour, and in the corners are 3x3 grids used to store combinations of an opponent's captured pieces.

The movement proceeds the same as with chess except under the following circumstance. When a player captures a certain combination of three of the opponent's pieces, that player's King is able to move 2 spaces at a time. If another combination is captured, the King may move the three spaces (which is the maximum).

The game ends when one of two conditions is met: If a player is checkmated or if a player can get his/her King to the center square of his/her colour.

There are several variations to the game.

The Battle of Bunker Hill (1990)

The Battle of Bunker Hill (1990)

Ratings

4.85714 out of 10 with 7 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

"Stand in the redoubt on Breed's Hill with Colonel Prescott, Joseph Warren and 1600 New England Militia as they await the British attack. The cannon fire from British warships in Boston Harbor has set Charleston ablaze, and dense smoke clouds the field. British general Sir William Howe has landed 2,000 British regulars, including the elite grenadiers and light infantry. The red clad soldiers form their lines. The assault begins as the redcoats advance uphill through the tall grass. Will the ill-trained Americans defeat the British attack, or will the redoubt be overrun by the forces of King George? Refight the Battle of Bunker Hill in this adaptation of an 18th century game.

The game of 'Asalto' or the 'Assault game' is a variation on the game 'Fox and Geese'."

2 American playing pieces on 9 squares defend against 24 British pieces that set up on 24 squares.

Juggernaut: Great Battles of Alexander Module (1992)

Juggernaut: Great Battles of Alexander Module (1992)

Ratings

7.095 out of 10 with 20 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
War Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

"Juggernaut simulates Alexander the Great's final, major battle - The Hydaspes. Having gained hegemony over virtually all of the civilized western world through a series of stunning victories the late, Great King of Persia, Darius III, Alexander heads east, mostly to satisfy his compulsive curiosity and need for conquest. Gobbling up tiny tribes, running into a few pockets of guerrilla resistance, but pretty much advancing at will, the Macedonian juggernaut heads into what is now known as India, only to be met at the River Hydaspes (today the Jelum) by the army of the local - and powerful - rajah, Porus. His crossing thwarted by the presence of Porus' elephant corps ling the banks of the deep and swift river, Alexander uses a ruse to effect an upriver crossing and force Porus into pitched battle."

100 red and blue die-cut counters that must be augmented by counters from previous modules.

Expands:

The Great Battles of Alexander




Frigates! (1991)

Frigates! (1991)

Ratings

5.66667 out of 10 with 3 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
War Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

"Beat to quarters and clear for action when you take command of one of America's famous fighting warships. Sail the U.S.S. Constitution or the U.S.S. Constellation into combat against ships of the British and French navies. Watch the wind and gain the 'weather-gauge' in seven different detailed ship-to-ship battles from 1798 to 1815."

Logistics Command (1978)

Logistics Command (1978)

Ratings

7.25 out of 10 with 4 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
War Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Produced by the Westinghouse Labs Weapons Division, possibly as a sales or training aid.

A simple two-player board, card and dice game of force building and maintenance set during the Cold War.

Each turn each player (Red and Blue) must use his budget to buy new combat units (air, land or naval) or support units (bases, repair depots, etc) and maintain his existing units.

Each unit is rated for combat effectiveness, MTBF (Mean Time Between Failures), MTTR (Mean Time To Repair) and Cost. Generally, Blue units are more reliable and have a higher combat effectiveness but cost more and take longer to repair. When a unit does break down the player can then use any of his support units to try to repair them.

Each turn a card is flipped to represent the political action for that turn. A crisis requires a minimum force level of a certain type (land, sea or air) to avoid a prestige penalty. A Showdown occurs just once and ends the game - the player with the highest amount of ready force wins the game.

The game is thus a trade off between keeping sufficient force level to win the Crises and sufficient force mix to win the final Showdown.

Gopher It! (1999)

Gopher It! (1999)

Ratings

6.03835 out of 10 with 133 ratings
Board Game Rank: 7060
Children's Game Rank: 156

Description

This children's card game is about gophers collecting their winter food supply.

Each supply card shows one to three apples, carrots or nuts. During their turn, the active player can uncover in sequence up to four cards from the pile. If the same kind of fruit appears one after the other, then all cards uncovered in this turn are lost for the player. Since there are only three fruit sorts, this occurs regularly, so this provides tension both for children and adults.

If a player has more than six of a set, then he loses everything that he collected so far from this set.

If the player has exactly six pieces of a set, the player then receives a gopher trophy in exchange for the set. The first to get his third cup wins the game.

This game is not only pure gambling, but also offers tactical choices so children take part enthusiastically. The minimum age indicated by the manufacturer seems applicable as long as the child can count over six.

Call of Cthulhu: Collectible Card Game (2004)

Call of Cthulhu: Collectible Card Game (2004)

Ratings

6.90111 out of 10 with 632 ratings
Board Game Rank: 1979
Customizable Rank: 52

Description

From FFG's Chris:
The Cthulhu genre is among the most recognized and well-regarded in the gaming hobby, and we hope to provide a fast, clever, and horrific collectible card game in this juicy setting, complete with 1920’s paranormal investigations, jaded detectives, mad cultists, and horrors from beyond the stars.

From the press release:
The CALL OF CTHULHU CCG will have no relation or compatibility to the Mythos Collectible Card Game published by Chaosium, Inc in the late 1990’s. Fantasy Flight’s CALL OF CTHULHU CCG will present new and innovative game play which will be simply, fast, and yet provide a deep and dynamic experience for players. The CALL OF CTHULHU CCG will seek to inspire the wonderful flavor of the Cthulhu genre, such as the flavorful "pulp" 1930’s environment, arcane tomes and secrets, paranormal investigations, the elder gods and their terrible servants, dark sinister plots, inhuman conspiracies, and dangers from beyond the stars.

Reimplemented by:
Call of Cthulhu: The Card Game

Online Play


OCTGN


Frenzy (2003)

Frenzy (2003)

Ratings

5.67322 out of 10 with 211 ratings
Board Game Rank: 9116

Description

Frenzy! is an innovative, fast-and-furious non-collectible gaming approach to fantasy battles, where players must manage a real-time skirmish evolving before them, while carefully keeping a watchful eye on their supply lines. The game has four different races with Orcs, Knights, Undead, and Dwarves each represented in their own furious strength, skills, art, special abilities, and assortment of cards. It was designed by Eric Lang, lead designer of the Game of Thrones CCG.

Leréia

Leréia

Ratings

6.746 out of 10 with 75 ratings
Board Game Rank: 5961

Description

It's a bluffing game, about the meaning of unusual words.

One player (the leader of the round) take a card from the pile (each card have some unusual words and the correct meaning of them), then he chooses a word and reads it aloud for the rest of the players. Each one of the players must write secretly a meaning for the word on a piece of paper. A player can write the correct meaning of the word if he knows it or write some wrong meaning in order to trick all the other players into thinking that this meaning is the correct one. After all players have written their papers, the leader reads aloud all of the definitions gave from the players adding the correct definition from the card. Then, each player vote on the definition he thinks is the correct, the votes are scored and the round ends.

Obalistig (1997)

Obalistig (1997)

Ratings

5.44706 out of 10 with 17 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

This is a game like set. There are different symbols on each cards, but there are always 3 cards that matches. They look only a little bit different and is hard to see. You get points for all sets you collect if they match. There is also a junior version on the same cards. The back of the cards have easier animal symbols for the junior edition.

Shocking Roulette (2003)

Shocking Roulette (2003)

Ratings

5.22045 out of 10 with 132 ratings
Board Game Rank: 12689

Description

Not so much a game as it is a torture device . . .

From publisher's site:

Think you're strong willed enough? Do you want a real test of nerves? Here it is. To play Shocking Roulette, simply place your finger in one of the victim slots and start the roulette lights running. The machine then selects one of the victims at random to receive a shock !!

No Better Place to Die (1994)

No Better Place to Die (1994)

Ratings

7.23739 out of 10 with 119 ratings
Board Game Rank: 3992
War Game Rank: 575

Description

No Better Place to Die - The Battle of Murfreesboro, Dec. 30, 1862 to Jan. 2, 1863, is the eighth game in The Gamers Civil War Brigade (CWB) Series from The Gamers. It recreates the vicious struggle between Major General Rosecrans' Union Army of the Cumberland and General Bragg's Army of Tennessee from December 30th, 1862 to January 2nd, 1863 near the town of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.

Game Scale:
Game Turn: 30 minutes
Hex: 200 yards
Units: Brigades

Game Inventory:
Two 22 x 34" full color maps
One dual-side printed countersheet (280 1/2" counters)
One 32-page CWBS 2nd edition revised system rulebook
One 12-page No Better Place to Die specific rulebook
Two 6-sided dice

Solitaire Playability: High
Complexity Level: Medium
Players: 1 or more
Playing Time: 2-30 hours

Vegas (1973)

Vegas (1973)

Ratings

4.54615 out of 10 with 13 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Vegas is a card game directed by a six-sided roller. When the roller stops spinning it leaves one side facing up with a "Key Letter" showing. Several "Pots" can be won during the game for certain lettered cards played and for special scoring values. The ultimate goal is to win the Big Pot and to have the most chip value at the end of the game.

Der Schuh des Manitu: Das Kartenspiel (2002)

Der Schuh des Manitu: Das Kartenspiel (2002)

Ratings

3.66667 out of 10 with 6 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

A card game to the famous German movie "Der Schuh des Manitou". Wild West theme. The cards have the design from the movie, very nice to look at. The goal is to earn the most bunny - chips. ( yes - bunny chips, because in the movie one of the Indians wears a bunny costume)

Cross-City (1996)

Cross-City (1996)

Ratings

6.16667 out of 10 with 21 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

This is a Wild West game. Welcome to Cross City, build a saloon or perhaps a Sheriffs department. This game has a little bit of Monopoly, but just a little, the rulebook is 30 pages long.

Zhadu: Legend of the Sharing (2001)

Zhadu: Legend of the Sharing (2001)

Ratings

7.32955 out of 10 with 22 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Abstract Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Each player has 5 stones that have a numerical value - 1 stone, 2 stone, 3 stone, 4 stone and the (1,2,3 stone - it can be the value of 1,2, or 3). The value of each stone
determines the number of spaces it can move on the board.

The objective of game is to "remember the Sharing". This happens when the total value of your first and last capture equals four. Other stones captured "in-between" are simply removed.

Here's break-down taken from the rules:

"If the first stone you capture is the:


(4 stone), then you have successfully "remembered the Sharing"
(123 stone), then you must now capture the 1 stone, 2 stone or 3 stone to win.
(3 stone), then you must capture the 1 stone or 123 stone to win.
(2 stone), then you must capture the 123 stone to win.
(1 stone), then you must capture the 3 stone or 123 stone to win. "


Trivial Pursuit: All American Edition (1993)

Trivial Pursuit: All American Edition (1993)

Ratings

5.34902 out of 10 with 51 ratings
Board Game Rank: 12126

Description

Both Master and Card set versions available. The Master game version comes with gameboard, playing pieces, instructions, trivia cards, and category code card. Cards come in these six categories: People, Entertainment, History, Places, Sports & Leisure and Wild Card.

Cards are related to all things American.

Stoner Fluxx (2003)

Stoner Fluxx (2003)

Ratings

5.65806 out of 10 with 613 ratings
Board Game Rank: 9486

Description

It's Fluxx, the game with the ever-changing rules, on weed. For adults.

Fluxx is a card game where the cards themselves determine the current rules of the game. By playing cards, you change numerous aspects of the game: how to draw cards, how to play cards, and even how to win.

At the start of the game, each player holds three cards and on a turn a player draws one card, then plays one card. By playing cards, you can put new rules into play that change numerous aspects of the game: how many cards to draw or play, how many cards you can hold in hand or keep on the table in front of you, and (most importantly) how to win the game.

The American Revolution 1775-1783 (1972)

The American Revolution 1775-1783 (1972)

Ratings

6.15077 out of 10 with 65 ratings
Board Game Rank: 8543
War Game Rank: 1884

Description

SPI area-movement simulation of The American Revolution 1775-1783. 9-page rules folder, 255 counters, unmounted 17" x 22" paper map. Regions on the map consist of multiple movement areas, with terrain-dependent movement cost to enter an area.

Counters are multiples of strength points, each strength point being equal to 500 men. No combat distinction between infantry and cavalry or between militia and regulars. Colonial militia appears at full force in a region whenever a British force enters it but can never leave the region. Tory militia appears once per region the first time British regulars enter, and they can be converted to regulars and leave the region, but will never reappear in that region once they've left.

The British player wins by controlling regions whose victory point total exceeds the scenario requirement. Colonials win by winning three major battles, by winning two major battles while limiting the British player to less than half of the scenario victory point total, or by lasting to the end of 1783 without the British player winning.

Multiple "what-if" situations are provided, with each one adjusting the British victory point level required to win. Many of these can be used in combination, resulting in moderate replay value.

Domino Land (1995)

Domino Land (1995)

Ratings

0 out of 10 with 0 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Children's Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Domino Land is a variation on traditional dominoes for young children.

Description from the rules: In Domino Land the cards are slotted inside each other and built upwards rather than laid in a row. Fitting the cards together in this way means that you can make creative 3-dimensional designs: a colorful ball here, a heart over there, a cat in between - and at the back is a donkey looking out of his stall!

The pieces are divided evenly amongst the players and the object of the game is to be the first player to get rid of all of their pieces by matching the design on previously placed pieces.

Sacrifice in the East (2001)

Sacrifice in the East (2001)

Ratings

6 out of 10 with 2 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
War Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

"Sacrifice in the East is a two-player game based on the final months of World War Two where the Soviet Army finally ejected German forces from the Soviet Union. The portion of the battle simulated here represents a nightmare delaying action as German forces tried futilely to prevent the avenging Red Army from penetrating Germany during the final days of World War Two. In the game, one player controls German forces while the other player controls the Soviet forces."

Panzerschreck Magazine, Issue 7, Winter 2001-02.
This 10 semi-monthly turn game starts in Dec II, 1944. It has an 8.5"x11" b&w map of the Polish portion of the eastern front totaling 191 hexes. 88 colored counters need to be mounted for play.

Complexity appears to be on par with an early SPI Quad game.

Andersonville (2001)

Andersonville (2001)

Ratings

5 out of 10 with 1 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Abstract Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

"Andersonville is a very simple card game for three or four players. Its theme is based on life in the notorious Andersonville prison camp that operated in Georgia during the American Civil War. Originally designed to hold 10,000 men, the 26 acre camp would end up holding 33,000 prisoners during its busiest month of operation. Between the months of February 1864 and April 1865, 13,000 Union prisoners died there.

The object of Andersonville is to finish with the most Survival points. To achieve this end, players will need to use strategy, bluff, and some diplomacy."

Panzerschreck Magazine, Issue 7, Winter 2001-02.
This card game has four Player Card decks (numbered 1-10) and a 46 numbered Action cards, Survival chits, and Health markers. Special rules are given for solitaire and two-player versions.

Winter War (1972)

Winter War (1972)

Ratings

7.07019 out of 10 with 156 ratings
Board Game Rank: 3783
War Game Rank: 612

Description

Covers the 1939-1940 war between Finland and the Soviet Union. Four-page rules folder, map, and 120 die-cut counters.

The Soviets have a massive strength advantage but their heaviest units can't be used north of the arctic circle and all Soviet units must be able to trace a supply line back to Leningrad at all times. Finnish units don't need supply in Finland, they have the advantage of prepared defenses south of the arctic circle, and Finnish units have higher mobility than Soviet units.

The Russians have to successfully invade Finland and take objective cities to win. The Finns simply have to hold out for ten turns.

Playable as a game rather than just as a simulation, unlike many later SPI offerings.

Two games in one. The base game favors an experienced Soviet player, who will often break through the Mannerheim line in a fairly historical manner around turns 7-9. The optional special events, depending on which are rolled, tend to favor the Finns, sometimes reducing the number of turns to just 5, placing tremendous time pressure on the Soviets. Play the base game several times before adding the optional "What-if" events.

Collegiate Crew (1974)

Collegiate Crew (1974)

Ratings

5 out of 10 with 8 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Collegiate Crew loosely simulates a collegiate crew event between 2-6 colleges, consisting of Freshman, JV, and Varsity races. Event cards are used to give players special abilities to use during the race, and players are given the chance to choose their stroke rate and change their stroke rate once during the race, with higher rates increasing the possibility of moving faster but lowering the expected value.

Winners of Freshman and JV races earn extra cards for the Varsity race while race losers give up a card. Play all 3 races to experience the entire game. The object is to win the Varsity race. As in the real world, nothing else matters except who wins the varsity.

Joust (2003)

Joust (2003)

Ratings

4.95833 out of 10 with 18 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Joust is a very brief two player game themed around jousting, inspired by En Garde and Pico, where players plan out their strategy by stacking a small group of cards - and then play them out in this fixed order.

Legacy of Glory (1990)

Legacy of Glory (1990)

Ratings

6 out of 10 with 11 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
War Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Legacy of Glory is a set of rules for fighting tactical Napoleonic battles. The preferred figure scale is 1:60 and the ground scale is 1" = 50 meters. Play is divided into 2-hour Grand Battle Turns, with each Grand Battle Turn subdivided into six tactical turns. Players normally take the role of army and corps commanders, and receive a variable number of command points each Grand Battle Turn, the actual number being determined by the talent rating of the historical general they're representing and the roll of two 10-sided dice. Commanders issue orders to the units under them, with each order requiring a different number of command points. Once an order is issued, there's some delay before it can be executed. The minimum delay depends on distance between the commander issuing the order and the most distant unit affected by it, and there's a variable number of tactical turns of additional delay, dependent on the quality of the generals involved and the roll of two ten-sided dice, before the order actually gets carried out. The smallest units on the board are infantry battalions, cavalry regiments, and artillery batteries, but orders are issued only down to division (or elite brigade level).

Actions within a tactical turn are divided up into multiple phases, most of which are skipped in any particular turn because they don't apply (e.g., the infantry combat resolution phase is skipped if no infantry units are in melee this tactical turn). The designers state in the foreword that one of their objectives is that experienced players should be able to run wall-clock time and game time just about in synch--that is, a Grand Battle Turn should not take more than 2 hours to play, even at the hottest point in the battle.

The original rules came in a bookcase-sized box, and included a rulebook (with rating charts for units and generals, by nationality), three pages of combat charts, three sheets of thin board status markers, and a pair of different-colored 10-sided dice. An updated set of rules was supposed to be issued in 2000-2001, but appears to have fallen by the wayside. Some play test versions of the updated rules do exist.

These are NOT simple rules. They require a fair amount of knowledge of the Napoleonic period to play, since they reward historical formations and tactics and penalize certain forms of rule-lawyering. The ground scale requires a fair amount of playing area, enough that most historical battles could only be put on by a gaming club or run as a convention event.

1914: Opening Moves (2001)

1914: Opening Moves (2001)

Ratings

6.56667 out of 10 with 15 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
War Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

"1914: Opening Moves is a simple solitaire game where the gamer plays the German, and the game system plays the allies. The object of the game is to get enough victory points (VP) to win. VP can be gained by holding VP hexes on the western front (on the map, vs. the western allies), and through rolls simulating developments on the eastern front (vs. Russia). The gamer sets up, moves, and conducts the German offensives as he chooses. The game system handles the allies, who are generally on the defensive. Specific rules will instruct allied units about when/where to attack, how to retreat if a retreat occurs, and general movement directions. The game lasts a total of five turns, representing mid-August to early September, 1914, the most fluid period in the west during the Great War."

Panzerschreck Magazine, Issue 7, Winter 2001-02.
This solitaire "mini-sim" has a 5.5"x8.5" b&w map of the western front totaling 87 hexes. 48 black on white or gray counters need to be mounted for play.

Tortoise and the Hare Board Game (1994)

Tortoise and the Hare Board Game (1994)

Ratings

6.80556 out of 10 with 18 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Children's Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

"Does slow and steady win the race?"

"Includes double spinner, game board and 4 games pieces"

Ages 3 and up

Sealed box with a photo that looks like this is a Candyland-like game.

Activity (1990)

Activity (1990)

Ratings

6.00982 out of 10 with 560 ratings
Board Game Rank: 4520
Party Game Rank: 282

Description

This is a party game from Piatnik played in 2-4 teams with at least 2 players each. The teams' meeples move over the board, the goal is to reach the finish. Depending on the sort of field they are currently standing at, one player has to act (pantomime) or to describe or to paint a phrase given on a card and the other members of his team have to find out what that should be. If they manage to do so, their meeple moves forward.
There are several editions and expansions for this game.

Nominated for the Deutscher Spieler Preis in 1993 (ended at the bottom of the nominations).

A new edition, Activity 2, was created in 2002.

Fußball

Fußball

Ratings

0 out of 10 with 0 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Soccer using pawns...

Grenadier (1972)

Grenadier (1972)

Ratings

5.72449 out of 10 with 49 ratings
Board Game Rank: 11003
War Game Rank: 2290

Description

Grenadier - Tactical Warfare: 1680 - 1850

Grenadier is a company/battery/squadron scale game of warfare in the period of the dominance of cannon and musket. The game depicts sixteen famous battles from the introduction of the bayonet to the invention of rifling. Because of the tactical scale of Grenadier some of the battles are represented by crucial segments, isolated and simulated. For example the Battle of Waterloo (1815) is represented by the attack of Napoleon's Old Guard on the center of the British line, The Battle of the Pyramids (1798) by the attack of the Marmeluke cavalry on the most exposed French infantry. Several other battles such as Palo Alto (1846) from the Mexican War are covered entirely. Commanders represented include Marlborough, Frederick the Great, Napoleon, Ney, Wellington, and Zachary Taylor. Some of the 16 battles depicted in Grenadier are Blenheim, Austerlitz, Marengo and Jena. Attacks are divided into fire (musket and cannon) and shock (bayonet and saber) modes. There are nine types of infantry units, three cavalry and five artillery. Grenadiers combat resolution systems depends less on chance (die rolls) than any game then yet developed.

Armageddon: Tactical Combat 3000 to 500 B.C. (1972)

Armageddon: Tactical Combat 3000 to 500 B.C. (1972)

Ratings

5.95294 out of 10 with 51 ratings
Board Game Rank: 9803
War Game Rank: 2055

Description

Originally published in Strategy & Tactics magazine #34.

From the rules folder: "Armageddon is a simulation of the art of warfare from the earliest organized armies (c. 3000 BC) to the time that marching in step was introduced (c. 600 BC). The game represents the tactics and possible results of many of the battles of this period. These battles are shown as scenarios giving a mix of units which are played out on sections of the homogeneous mapsheet to represent the actual terrain (as much as is known) of the original battlefield. There are seven different types of infantry units, two of cavalry and several other units available in the game; these units are provided in different quantities for each of the Player's (sic) of a scenario to recreate the historical armies. The game Armageddon has 14 scenarios, each of them representing two armies of the period, and assigning them positions on the map on which the players recreate the historic battles."

Game components: 255 die-cut counters, heavy paper hex map with terrain features and the scenarios printed to one side of the mapboard, and a rulebook. One six-sided die is also needed.

Mechanics: Alternating movement turns consisting of fire phase, movement phase, and combat phase for one player, then second player does the same. No zones of control. Units have facing, and can only move into the three hexes to their "front" or change facing at a movement point cost. Stacking is limited to three units per hex, but applies only at end of movement. Units have "front" and "flank" melee combat strengths, and use the latter when attacked from any of the three rear hexes. Combat results are no effect, disruption, retreat, 1/2 elimination, or elimination, and only affect the defender.

Beyblade TCG (2003)

Beyblade TCG (2003)

Ratings

4.54545 out of 10 with 11 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Children's Game Rank: Not Ranked
Customizable Rank: Not Ranked

Description

A TCG based on the television show/toy line Beyblade. The game simulates tops battling in an arena. There are two different levels of play, one for young children and a more advanced game for those who want more depth.

Each player starts by taking one Blade card and placing it face up in front of him/her. Each Blade has its own "spin strength". You count that number of cards from the top of your deck and place them face down in a "spin pile" under the Blade card. The spin pile is very important, since the object of the game is to run your opponent out of spin by removing all the cards in his/her spin pile.

Players take turns initiating battles which go back and forth until one player cannot make a play. Then players determine how many cards will be lost from the losing player's spin pile using symbols that match up on the tops of the cards. The advanced version uses card text to take the game to a deeper level.

Brain Strain (1989)

Brain Strain (1989)

Ratings

5.625 out of 10 with 4 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

"The Inky Dinky Game". The goal is to come up with the correct rhyming answer to one of the 5 questions printed on each of the 500 cards. Different categories indicate how the rhyming words will be arranged - an "Ink Dink" is two single-syllable rhyming words, an "Ink a Dink" is two rhyming words with "a" in the middle, and "Inky Dinky" means two rhyming words each with two syllables.

For example: an Inky Dinky for "A tabby's glove" would be "Kitten Mitten".

Also includes a board to mark progress and which of the 5 questions needs to be answered, 4 player/team markers, a die, and black score discs.

Po-Ke-No (1930)

Po-Ke-No (1930)

Ratings

4.34646 out of 10 with 147 ratings
Board Game Rank: 13764
Party Game Rank: 424

Description

Includes 12 boards and a large number of poker-style chips (no cards, however). Paraphrased from the box:

A game that is a combination of the two games known as Poker and Keno (or Lotto), with features that make it more interesting and exciting than either.

Each player, except the dealer, is given a board and some counters. If there are no more players than boards, the dealer may also play if desired. The dealer or "caller" is furnished with an ordinary deck of 52 playing cards, shuffles them, and turns over the top one calling it out. Each player with that space on their board covers it with a counter. The dealer continues turning over cards until someone wins by having a complete row of five scored, either horizontally or vertically. The player who wins becomes the next dealer.

Several scoring methods are suggested, such as collecting all counters lying on other boards. Or, continue playing until everyone has a line of five, then scoring via the rank of poker hands - the boards are arranged so that each line vertically and horizontally represents every different poker hand, ranging from a "straight flush" to "a pair".

European Theater of Operations (2003)

European Theater of Operations (2003)

Ratings

6.89 out of 10 with 10 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
War Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

NEPPAGames: European Theater of Operations or ETO is a World War II Game of Grand Strategy Created by NEPPAGames. Do not mix it up with another game by the same name from TSR/ SPI or the latter Decision Games.

NEPPAGames: ETO's historical simulation of the European Theater during World War II provides the framework where players are free to pursue their own strategic course of action. Each action has both short term and long term economic and military consequences. How players react to these consequences in relation to their own strategy will ultimately decide their fate.

Six different games (three Campaigns and three Scenarios) are available right out of the box, allowing players to select a game based upon their interests and available time. Game turns are seasonal, each representing a three month period. The map board, hard-mounted, depicts the WWII battlegrounds of Europe from France to Russia, and from Norway to North Africa to the Middle East.

While the interaction of all the different aspects of NEPPAGames: ETO is complex, the game is designed with simplicity and maximum playability in mind. On an Avalon Hill complexity rating, ETO's complexity would be about 7.

NEPPAGames: ETO™ uses a zone-based area movement system for ground and air units. The use of a zone or area-based mapboard significantly increases playability. Since each hex covers less ground than a zone or area, hexed base games require more playing pieces. More playing pieces require more time to move them around, which is what the game wanted to avoid in the first place. The mapboard measures approximately 2ft x 3ft (or 24"x36").

Stacking limits are imposed. Terrain effects on combat are considered. Terrain and map features include mountains, swamps, beaches, fortresses,overwater crossings, ports (both beach and coastal), capital cities, special Russian defense and factory zones, oil, and more. Warfare Production Points or WPP's (Pronounced whips) are the currency of NEPPAGames: ETO. WPPs pay for everything from Declarations of War to Unit Construction. Something that is similar in concept of Building Resources Points (BRPs) in Third Reich, The Rise and Fall of from Avalon Hill.

Represented in NEPPAGames: ETO are the forces of Germany, Italy, Britain, France, Russia, the United States, the Axis Minor Allies, and the armies of almost all neutral countries are depicted in the game. Each country's army is unique, with a fixed force pool of various unit types which are either available at start or available but unbuilt. Additional units may become available at historically appropriate times. Units include infantry, artillery, armor, air, naval, airborne, and U-boats. Each unit has different capabilities and differing attack and defense values. The units that will come with the game will be cardboard counters.

Ground combat features both normal combat and armored breakthrough and exploitation. Air units within range of a battle can lend their weight both on the attack and in defense. Air superiority is most often a requirement for success on the battlefield. Attacks can be made in the face of a heavy defense, but success is not guaranteed, and often, a heavy price must be paid.

Naval units are required for amphibious invasion, transport, shipping of troops and currency, shore bombardment, and strategic warfare. German U-boats can launch attacks against the steady stream of incoming convoys bound for Britain or attempt to sever the Murmansk convoy routes. As time passes, Allied ASW forces gain in both numbers and effectiveness.

NEPPAGames: ETO will have you engaged in a titanic clash between Allied and Axis forces on old and perhaps new battlefields of WWII. The outcome is up to you.

The design goal was to combine the best elements of several existing board games (including but not limited to Axis and Allies, Third Reich, Advanced Third Reich, General Patton, etc) into a very playable, very historical package. The game will have appeal to several categories of gamers:

1) Current Axis and Allies players looking for more historical and less ahistorical play (i.e. "the stack"),
2) Former Avalon Hill gamers who enjoyed the historical accuracy and gameplay but wished for less complexity and more playability, and
3) New gamers wanting to play a great new WWII strategy game.

Game components include:
2ft x 3ft Beautifully Rendered Mounted Map Board
20 page Game Manual
8 page Campaign and Scenario Booklet that includes six different games you can play right out of the box
442 Superbly Detailed Die-Cut Counters
9 Counter Bags
18 Force Pool Cards for use with the appropriate Campaign or Scenario
1 Turn Sequence Sheet
2 Dice
Game Box

Battle of Stanrey (1984)

Battle of Stanrey (1984)

Ratings

6.75 out of 10 with 12 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
War Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

This game is based on a Japanese anime called Fang of the Sun - Dougram. The show is about a loose-knit group of people who band together in order to break away the Planet Deloyer from the oppressive Earth-Empire "The Union". The rebels are typically undermanned, but high in fighting skill and valor.

Battle of Stanrey is a hex-based miniatures game that comes with 23 die-cast metal mech figures and a set of 20 three-dimensional plastic tree models to be used on a 6-piece modular board. If a tree is potentially in the line-of-sight, the player peers through a miniature periscope placed on the battlefield; if at least 50% of the enemy model is visible, then the unit may fire. Combat is resolved with a single six-sided die roll that is cross-referenced on a Hit Chart, that takes into account the statistics of both the offensive and defensive units.

Megazone 23 (1985)

Megazone 23 (1985)

Ratings

7 out of 10 with 1 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Complexity level 4 on Tsukada's 1-6 scale (1=easiest).

"The game of City Fight in Megazone 23"

Hex and counter style wargame based off the anime. Mech are mostly of the transforming vehicle type(particularly motorcycles).

Giant Gorg (1984)

Giant Gorg (1984)

Ratings

5 out of 10 with 1 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Complexity level 2 on Tsukada's 1-6 scale (1=easiest)

"The Game of Ground fighting in Giant Gorg"

A card-based science-fiction mecha game based off the anime. The game includes 300 cards. The cards are used for almost everything; terrain, movement, characters, mechs, and so on. The only other item used in the game is a 6-sided die.

Wizardry: Tiltowait Card Game (1991)

Wizardry: Tiltowait Card Game (1991)

Ratings

0 out of 10 with 0 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Uno with more special cards and a fantasy (Wizardry) theme to it.

Plays exactly like Uno, down to having to say a special word when you're down to one card. The only differences is the nice artwork on the cards, and the magic spells.

However, most of the magic spells work the same as the special Uno cards (Draw Two, Draw Four, Skip, and so on); but there are a few more of them, including 'counter spells'. Easy to play without Japanese knowledge as long as each player has a translated spell list (there's 10 spells).

Die Bremer Stadtmusikanten (1987)

Die Bremer Stadtmusikanten (1987)

Ratings

5.38462 out of 10 with 13 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Nice and clever boardgame based on a famous German fairytale.

Players move around 4 different animals (donkey, dog, cat and a cock). Like in the fairytale they have to work together against the evil robber. Smaller animals can be placed on top of the bigger animals and only a complete stack of four (which needn't be all from the same player) might win against the robber.

A good amount of thinking involved in this die rolling game.

Mobile Suit Gundam: Char's Counterattack (1988)

Mobile Suit Gundam: Char's Counterattack (1988)

Ratings

6 out of 10 with 1 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
War Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

"The tactical combat and Role Playing game in Gundam world"

Includes two rulebooks, one for using the contents of the box for a beginner-level wargame, and one for using it as an expansion to the "WARPS" (Wild Adventure Role Playing System) game. Other contents include 2 data charts, pilot character sheets, 6 maps, a sheet of counters, 2 six-sided and 2 ten-sided dice, and well as a counter tray.

This is based off the Mobile Suit Gundam anime series and is part of the Mobile Suit Gundam familly of games.

Friday, April 29, 2016

Check Six! (1983)

Check Six! (1983)

Ratings

4.9 out of 10 with 6 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
War Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

"Check Six! Air Combat in the Missile Era"

"Check Six! puts you in the cockpit of a modern, high-performance supersonic jet fighter, commanding a flight of up to eight jets. Your mission is to provide 'Air Superiority' by clearing the skies of enemy fighters . . . You can simulate an air engagement from the wars of Korea, Vietnam, Middle East, or you can fly in a hypothetical scenario which you create!"

This game of plane-to-plane combat was produced for the U.S. Air Force by Close Simulations as a part of Project Warrior. Avalon Hill would later print a revised version of the game under the name Flight Leader.

Re-implemented by:

Flight Leader




Sunday Drivers, A Car Wars Supplement (1982)

Sunday Drivers, A Car Wars Supplement (1982)

Ratings

6.31528 out of 10 with 127 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
War Game Rank: Not Ranked
Thematic Rank: Not Ranked

Description

"Sunday Drivers is a Car Wars supplement (you will need the original Car Wars rules to play). The game goes best with three to six players. Two scenarios are supplied, and players can easily invent their own scenarios using the 42x32 inch Midville street map. Game components include 160 full-color counters painted by Denis Loubet (police cars, the Ambunaught, cyclists, pedestrian, chain, police, MONDOs, and more); two 21x32 inch map sections; 24 pages of rules."

Crash City was originally published in the Space Gamer magazine as an article named "Sunday Drivers". It was later published as a full Car Wars supplement under the same name and later this supplement was renamed Crash City.

Part of the Car Wars Series.

Expands:

Car Wars




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