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Sunday, February 28, 2016

WFF 'N PROOF (1962)

WFF 'N PROOF (1962)

Ratings

4.76316 out of 10 with 57 ratings
Board Game Rank: 12909
Abstract Game Rank: 808

Description

The complete set of 21 games that started with the game of WFF (q.v.).

The game includes 36 special dice, a timer, and a 184 page rules and examples manual.

The games included in this set are actually a set of logic rules presented in a 'Programmed Instruction' order. Each game adds to all prior games until Game 21, Frantic WFF 'N PROOF, is attained.

As well as building WFFs (Well Formed Formulas), players must also try to reach a goal by using rules of inference.

For example: If the goal is 'p', a player could use the 'Ko' (or Conjunction Out) rule and use 'Kpq' as a premise. In other terms, if the following sentence is true: "The first games of WFF 'N PROOF are easy and the last games of WFF 'n PROOF are hard." Then it can be inferred that the following sentence is true: "The first games of WFF 'N PROOF are easy."

Up to 36 dice are rolled depending on the game being played. One player sets a 'goal' by building a WFF in the goal area of the playing mat. players then alternate playing dice to the "permitted" or "essential" sections of the play area. If a die is placed in the essential area it MUST be used in either a premise or a rule. If a player doesn't think that it can be used, he can challenge his opponent.

To win, a player must make a successful challenge or be unsuccessfully challenged.

Games 3 through 19 introduce the 11 Rules of Logical Inference in this order: Conjunction, Implication, Reiteration, Disjunction, Negation, and Equivalence. Then 18 more derived rules are added to the mix for Game 20, the PC (Propositional Calculus) game. The 21st and final game, Frantic WFF 'N PROOF, takes the PC game and adds timed moves for rapid and chaotic scoring.

  • Designer: Layman E. Allen, Robert W. Allen
  • Publisher: WFF 'N PROOF Games
  • Year Published: 1962
  • Number of Players: 2 - 4
  • Suggested Number of Players: 2
  • Manufacturer Suggested Ages: 6
  • Playing Time: 45
  • Subdomain: Abstract Games
  • Category: Abstract Strategy, Memory
  • Mechanic: Dice Rolling, Memory
  • Alternate Names: WFF, WFF 'N PROOF

Reviews

By
One of the precious few boardgames to be used in my grade school classrooms. Unfortunately, I didn't understand it then and I don't understand it now.

3 out of 10
By
If you are desperate to do some math, do math.

By
1976 edition

3 out of 10
By
Game or nightmare. That rulebook HAD to have been written by a logician...or a Vulcan.

By
foam insert has deteriorated.

4 out of 10
By
academic interest mostly.

By
I've heard good things about it, and would like to trade for a copy.

By
I really wanted to play this game, but could never talk anybody into it. Traded away unplayed.

5 out of 10
By
Sorry - poor excuse for a game. Part of me loves it because it's a game about logic, but... Not much of a game.

By
Mine is complete?

5 out of 10
By
They designed this game to teach formal logic and how to construct proofs. It's not great as a game, but as a teaching tool it beats studying!

6 out of 10
By
Curious feel to this game; it conjures up old Consumer Report magazines and Ralph Nader articles for some reason.

By
More of an exercise in logic than a game, this would take too long to get through the startup games to figure out the real game underneath. I suspect it's good when you get there, though.

By
From my Dad's old collection.

By
A game on FOPL?! Sign me up :)

1 out of 10
By
I could not understand this game at all.

By
GW in Menominee Falls, with Eric and nieces.

By
probably the greatest role playing game. get your geek on or die.

6 out of 10
By
For those of you who can't get enough polish notation Logic! (does anyone still teach that?) Very fun if you find Wittgenstein interesting. Difficult to find willing participants.

By
WFF: The Beginner's Game of Modern Logic. Good condition and complete.

By
1

6 out of 10
By
My head hurts just thinking about this game. Pure logic and deduction make this game a must for any statistician or mathematics teacher.

5 out of 10
By
As stated in other comments, the main problem with this game has always been finding someone to play it with. I remember reading the rulle book with fascination when young.

2 out of 10
By
no box

8 out of 10
By
A game of mathematical logic. What more could I wish for... There is only one thing wrong with this game: it is about propositional calculus, while I think first order logic is much more interesting. Oh yeah, of course, there is one more thing wrong with this game: there doesn't seem to be anyone who wants to play it...

By
Recommended by Fred Woodward.

By
Own WFF.

4 out of 10
By
Sort of cool from what I vaguely remember.

4 out of 10
By
Will sell/trade locally

By
I picked this up for like $3 at a booth at a convention three years ago, and I still don't know how it works. It has something to do with Calculus?

10 out of 10
By
If this is taught by somebody who has any aptitude for whimsy and fun, it is the best possible introduction to Logic available. If not, it is an onerous trek into the lowest parts of Hell.

2.5 out of 10
By
If you think doing formal logic proofs are fun, you'd probably have more fun sitting down and doing some proofs than playing this game. If you don't think it sounds like fun, you certainly won't like it.

By
I only have the 12-dice beginners WFF set, shown at https://boardgamegeek.com/image/20888/wff-n-proof.

5 out of 10
By
In storage

By
More of a logic exercise than a puzzle. The rulebook is...daunting.

4 out of 10
By
Only played the once, and only at the base level, but it turned out to be to work out who could apply the formula fastest once the dice was rolled (discard non-scoring dice, pair two lower case with upper case, then create pairs of upper case and lower case, then add N's) and that's the maximum number of dice that can be used to create a valid set. First one to call it out scores it. Which makes for a pretty lame experience as a game, and repetitive, but does provide some interest while you're working the formula out on the fly. Add dice to help out players who are already good at it even more.

5 out of 10
By
Good memories from when I was a kid learning math, but all the end conditions are a bit difficult to parse. Gift to Kelly for her gifted kids.

By
Foam packaging disintegrating

4 out of 10
By
Not much of a party game. Lacked the ability to created complex formulae.

10 out of 10
By
feed your inner logic nerd "Check OK"

5 out of 10
By
The 5 is for the bits. Loads of little wooden dice. Way cool. The games are something that might entertain a group between sessions at a science fair. Very dry.

4 out of 10
By
1

2 out of 10
By
I'm finished with problem sets. I'll work overtime before I play this game again.

By
Traded

By
Inherited from my father. Still have no idea how to play it. I'll get around to it! ;-)

2 out of 10
By
all the fun of abstract symbolic logic...now with dice! For people who like dry calculation combined with complex rules and pure luck.

5 out of 10
By
No for most gamers, but a great exploration of logic. With a makeover--and a quality, coherent rule book-- this could be a classic.

By
[July 2006, BGG Auction] I had the small Shake-a-WFF/Count-a-WFF beginner edition (12 dice).

By
[2 Player]

By
1968 edition

By
Vintage mid to late 1960s.

6 out of 10
By
A copy was left to me by my father on his passing. I've studied the rules somewhat and always wanted to delve deeper into the formal logic of Well Formed Formulae. I almost wish I was a student at a private high school that pushed your intelligence to this level. I've actually studied the rules, understand the CAKE constructs, etc. I emailed professor Layman Allen to find out if replacement dice were available, and he pointed me to the new edition!

By
Didn't know until sending an email to its author that the game was reprinted in a contemporary design! Nice to have a playable edition even if unlikely to get much (if any) play.

By
Box G6 Missing one blue die.

7 out of 10
By
If you enjoy solving problems in symbolic logic, this can be a blast. Finding even one willing opponent might not be easy, though. The rulebook is extremely thorough.

By
Deep down, this must have been satirical in intent. I hope so, anyway. But it's autotelic, that's for sure.

By
"you got your peanut butter in my chocolate!" "you got your chocolate in my peanut butter!" I've always loved logic. I've always loved games. Why not try mixing them? If nobody else wants to play with me, I'll just have to have kids and raise them not to know that this isn't fun ;)
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