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Monday, February 29, 2016

Squadron Scramble (1942)

Squadron Scramble (1942)

Ratings

4.32174 out of 10 with 23 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

A Rummy style card game where players form sets of cards comprised of the front, side and top views of WWII fighters and bombers.

Aircraft of USA, Britain, Germany, Japan, Russia and Italy are featured. The deck consist of 100 cards including 6 "Keep 'em Flying" wild cards, one Victory wild card and 3 cards each for the 31 types of aircraft represented.

Originally published in 1942 by Whitman Publishing, copyright National Aeronautic Association of the U.S.A., as 2 separate packs labeled "Card Game No. 1" (blue-backed cards) and "Card Game No. 2" (red-backed cards).

Card Game #1 includes a 52-card deck consisting of 16 sets of 3 aircraft cards, 3 "Keep 'em Flying" cards, and one "Victory" card. Featured are 9 U.S. aircraft, 3 Japanese, and 2 each from Britain and Germany. Instructions are printed on two additional cards.

Publisher's note on instruction card: "The illustrations used on these cards are authentic silhouette drawings of military planes and may be used in identifying and learning to recognize our planes and the planes of our enemies."

  • Designer: (Uncredited)
  • Publisher: U.S. Games Systems, Inc., Whitman
  • Year Published: 1942
  • Number of Players: 2 - 4
  • Suggested Number of Players: 4
  • Manufacturer Suggested Ages: 7
  • Playing Time: 10
  • Category: Aviation / Flight, Card Game, Educational, World War II
  • Alternate Names: Squadron Scramble

Reviews

By
Verified complete - 2002 reprint of game from 1942

By
x

6 out of 10
By
Set collection of WW2 fighters and bombers. Axis and Allied fighters may shoot down other players' sets of bombers to steal points. My understanding is that the game was designed during the war to teach people how to recognize the planes. I like the artwork and the concept, but I think the game runs a little long for what it is.

By
I have this still in shrink. Need to open it up! Looks great too!

By
(June 2007)

3 out of 10
By
Considering it was released during the Second World War as a way of getting kids to recognise military aircraft, it's not really a surprise that there's not much of a game in here. It's a rummy variant in which players must collect sets of aircraft silhouettes in order to gain points. Bombers are worth more, but fighters can shoot them down. It's not as flexible as rummy because the silhouettes to be collected are very specific, with no possibility of variation. It's just take a card drop a card, take a card drop a card. I have a set. Next.....

By
Card Game

2 out of 10
By
Too many sets.

By
Description and photos are for modern re-issue. Original 1942 game has only 52 cards, plus two cards with the rules. Have not played.

By
B

5 out of 10
By
Cards are cool, but game play is slow (at least, with two players), due to limited ability to meld (three of same aircraft type, possibly using wildcards instead). Picking up half the discard pile to get a needed card is not uncommon.

4 out of 10
By
Basic rummy, nothing exciting in that - but it's a reprint from an original from 1942, with the rummy sets consisting of three different recognition silhouettes of each plane (front, side, top). In other words, absolute eye candy. The box even includes a poster and some stickers, so it's basically every little boy's dream.

2 out of 10
By
Nice looking art work....Sorry excuse for a game.

By
recent republication

7 out of 10
By
If you like Rummy, it is the same. The clever parts are in shooting down bombers with opposing fighters, which are limited in that there must be the 3 exact cards of the configuration, no "wild" cards. You can "claim" wild cards from opponents who have laid 2 cards down with one wild card to make a complete set if you have the 3rd card. This way, you can complete your own sets. A points game. personally we make it more fun by adding humor as we "announce" what type of plane it is and "nationality". Meant to help you identify world war 2 planes in it's day. Now a relic.

5 out of 10
By
It's kinda weird, seeing "normal" print pattern, on the card backs...
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