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Sunday, February 28, 2016

18EU (2001)

18EU (2001)

Ratings

7.54877 out of 10 with 296 ratings
Board Game Rank: 2040
Strategy Game Rank: 858

Description

18EU is an 18xx title which depicts a century of European railroading from the 1830s to the 1930s. It shares much in common with other 18xx titles, but also includes 15 minor companies. They are auctioned before the game starts, then pay 50/50 dividend (Minor/Owner) and finally merge to form corporations. Another special element are bonuses for completing long runs between off-map areas, that can affect huge incomes in the end game. The map stretches from France to Austria and Poland, and from northern Germany to middle Italy and features the Alps as mountains (higher tile laying costs). The game is played in sets of two operating rounds, where the railroads are built, followed by one stock round, where shares are bought and sold.

The general idea of all 18xx titles is holding shares of railway companies, building railroads by laying hex-tiles, running trains and generating income paid out as dividend. The special thing (and difference to other games) is the difference between the players´ private money and the money in the companies´ treasuries. In the end the player, who managed to acquire the biggest private fortune, wins the game!

  • Designer: David G. D. Hecht
  • Publisher: (Web published), Deep Thought Games, LLC
  • Year Published: 2001
  • Number of Players: 2 - 6
  • Suggested Number of Players: 5
  • Manufacturer Suggested Ages: 14
  • Playing Time: 300
  • Suggested Ages: 14
  • Language Dependence: No necessary in-game text
  • Subdomain: Strategy Games
  • Category: Economic, Negotiation, Print & Play, Trains, Transportation
  • Mechanic: Auction/Bidding, Route/Network Building, Stock Holding, Tile Placement
  • Family: 18xx, Cities: Bologna, Cities: Florence, Cities: Genova, Cities: Milan, Cities: Rome, Cities: Torino, Cities: Venice
  • Alternate Names: 18EU

Reviews

By
PnP - 526

10 out of 10
By
Playtest PNP

By
Homemade print and play.

7 out of 10
By
2016-06-23 (rating 7): After playing more 18xx somehow this one no longer attracts me as much as it did before. 2011-05-27 (rating 8.5): A fine game. But it seems to me that way to much depends on the initial auction. It is not bad in itself but facing another 3 hours of play if you know that you are going to lose after the initial auction (which seems to be not so rare) isn't much fun.

8 out of 10
By
Ciekawa gra serii 18XX na mapie całej Europy. Można wydrukować samoróbkę + mapa Europy + emocjonująca licytacja firm startowych - nieudana licytacja początkowa potrafi przekreślić szansę na zwycięstwo

6 out of 10
By
A very variable game as companies are born from how the initial auction of private companies goes. Have heard a lot about the initial auction signalling the winner, having played twice now its probably true but i would like to play more; 1861 will probably survive as the better game for making majors out of minors.

7 out of 10
By
Good 18xx with a great starting-mechanism.

9.5 out of 10
By
:cry: :) :D :what: :) :yuk: Interesting twist on the 18xx system. Ended up liking it a lot more than I thought I would.

By
Worthy addition to growing list of 18xx games.

6 out of 10
By
Of course it is a good game as it is an 18xx game. But I have played it a couple of times now and find it a bit static in it's development.

7 out of 10
By
18EU starts with a bang: 15 minors are auctioned and each player would like to end up with a vaguely compatible set, without letting anyone end up with more than their share. The game is exciting up through about the 4-trains, after which things tend to bod down in route fiddling for an extra 10 here or there. This is not a dramatic 1830-style game of fighting hard to overcome liabilities -- permanent trains are somewhat plentiful and tend to be quite affordable. The result is a game that is won or lost on the finer details. I prefer the volatility of the 1830-branch of the series.

7 out of 10
By
Rating based on 1 four player game. I love the geography of the map, and the components of the deep thought game, but we seemed to have a lot of stations which acted as blockers keeping you from nice long runs. To me that clogged the board more than I would have liked.

8 out of 10
By
Built my own copy from the web. The web materials allow for a very nice copy of the game to be created.

8 out of 10
By
Tentative rating based on PBEM play so is subject to change once I will play it in real (I'm mostly curious about its playing time) but so far I like it. I especially like the fact that there is no chance of tile shortages as all tiles are in abundance.

9 out of 10
By
that people complain this is not replayable is most strange to me... I've had drastically different plays every time. meatiness/time ration is by far the highest of all games I know. though the drawback is that the game is for the most part decided in the first auction, with 1-2 players almost always out of the game, or someone with a clear lead...

8 out of 10
By
Untill now the best 18xx design of David Hecht. Historically the game isn't right at all, but the gameplay is very nice.

7 out of 10
By
Europe - Very satisfying game with all numbers. I like that the game will play quite differently based on how the minors sell.

By
Home made copy

10 out of 10
By
The more I play this one, the more I like it. It emphasises the things I like about 18xx (tile playing, route optimization) while downplaying or eliminating those I don't (stock manipulation, company looting). Currently my favorite 18xx. I know that most die-hards prefer the "tougher" game without the optional trains; however I prefer them with as it gives the minor at least 2 additional ORs of life and softens greatly the otherwise brutal train rush from 3s to 5s (and 6s). I rate 18EU itself a 9 as with enough plays I think I might tire of it, but as my current favorite of the 18xx system I have given it a rating of 10 to indicate my enjoyment of the 18xx series of games as a whole, which I do feel I will always want to play and don't see changing.

4.5 out of 10
By
Similar to 61, but without the government effects to provide a more interesting end-game element/factor.

9 out of 10
By
Weird opening easily ruined by inexperienced players or a simple lapse in attention. Fiddly end-game. Still a strong 18xx title of medium length.

7.5 out of 10
By
Enjoyable game, but only really works for 3 or 5 players. Initial auction can determine the outcome, but a well balanced auction leaves plenty of room for building strategy and, especially in the 5 player game, the fact that there are only 8 major corps makes a big difference in game play, with priority becoming huge just before the 5 trains come out. Edited after quite a few plays Jan 2012: I was completely wrong about only 3 or 5 players. 4 players is now my favorite number, if all are reasonably familiar with the game. Ending up with 3 minors and $50+ bucks is fine with me if they are good minors (won last weekend with 2 great minors and a dog.)

By
Half own it. I have printed the PnP files from Deep Thought and I have to still put together.

7.5 out of 10
By
Pretty good, but the juicy decisions really happen around the arrival of the 4-train, instead of the 5-6 trains like in the average. So the end it kind of bogs down to just making almost irrelevant upgrades and some annoying blocking.

4 out of 10
By
2013-01-15: OMG. Admittedly it's after only one play, but this may be my new favorite 18XX. The decisions at the beginning of what minors to acquire and whether to get what you want or get several later cheap. The decision shortly thereafter about when and what to convert into a corporation. The decisions about big runs versus stock values. At the end of the game, my company an for $930 with a share value of only $100. This was an absolutely amazing game! 2013-09-18: I still think it's a great game, but it's one where most of the interesting stuff happens in the initial auction and the first few ORs. By shortly after the mergers, the game is mostly over, despite having a couple more hours to play. I'll happily play it, but wouldn't ask to.

6 out of 10
By
A good enough 'xx design - but the flavor isn't to my liking. More about the long term track (and token) placement than about manipulating the stocks. May set too much importance on the trains you end up with, and, like 1835, companies are such a valuable commodity that it is seldom worthwhile to get rid of them. The initial packet is probably the most important decision you make - and it's difficult for a new player to accurately evaluate bidding.

9.2 out of 10
By
I like how the small company mergers accelerate the beginning of the game as well as providing a fresh setup for each game, but the openning auction can be confusing. Interesting progression and map.

5 out of 10
By
Off-mainline 18xx games are like Star Wars novels - they have different evaluation criterion than normal books. When viewed as a game, 18EU isn't terribly good - long, tedious in many spots, stereotyped - and is nowhere near being in the same league as 1825, 1830, 1856, or even the less-tight 2038 or 1853. On the other hand, judged solely as an 18xx game, it's not too bad - it's sufficiently different and has a unique flavor. But for anyone who isn't seriously in to 18xx, one to skip. More here: http://homepage.mac.com/c_farrell/iblog/C2097221587/E490937832/index.html

4.5 out of 10
By
Clever initial auction with extensively interesting side-effects. Deserves more play than it gets. Sadly, mostly only interesting up to the middle of the 5-trains.

8 out of 10
By
very nice twists: partial capitalisation, mergers I want to play this one again

8 out of 10
By
The initial auction is extremely interesting. I can't think of another 18xx experience that is quite like it. But the game seems prone to getting dull after the mid-game when all the larger corporations are created. Less room for stock manipulation / shenanigans. Maybe the bank needs to be a bit smaller to add tension to the game? Still, I look forward to playing again.

4 out of 10
By
This is probably one of my lowest rank of 18XX. The game has so much promises, yet fails in delivery. All the tension was when bidding Minor, but then the rest of the games feels flat and dry. The game protects you so much, unfortunately that means protecting your opponents too, making this uneventful game. Specialities: - 15 Minors that can (must) merge to make Major companies - No different zones at stock market (2D) - Players cannot sell the shares before it operates - Tracks are very restricted - May split dividend I give it twice (for maybe the 1st time is just wrong setup or something), but it didn't improve on 2nd play, so won't likely play again. The game is not too bad, but compared to lot others 18XX, so many titles to play, and so little time to play, making me probably won't play this game again.

7.9 out of 10
By
Lower rating because of the horrid geography!!! It may be necessary for play balance but the Italian topography is way out, Switzerland too..... But then the hexes are damn big

9 out of 10
By
Excellent 18xx title - the best I've played. The initial auction can make a huge difference to the lines built and the development of the game. As a result each game is significantly different. On the downside, the game can sometimes be over after the auction, particularly if someone isn't paying attention. The only other issue is a tendency to stall when no player stands to gain by bringing on the train rush.

By
PRINT AND PLAY

8.3 out of 10
By
Meu primeiro jogo 18XX, a explicação foi cansativa, mas o jogo recompensa! Nunca me senti atraído por jogos de trens, mas essa série promete.

By
PnP. Unplayed

7 out of 10
By
Rating is for the minor powers variant only. Base game is a 6 for me.

6 out of 10
By
A Deep Thought 18xx clone. Slow long lasting game, very scripted.

8 out of 10
By
Very nice 18XX, with enough depth to keep it interesting yet simple enough for a 18XX newby. Trying to figure out when to start a Major and which Minor to use is pretty interesting as is the initial auction of the Minors. Looking forward to playing again

8.5 out of 10
By
Apart of 18AL this was the 18xx version I liked best (however it was bas on only 1 play). It was fast, it was tense and not too long (about 6 hours). After 3 games we came down to less than 5 hours. Game is tense, and different every time due to the big number of minors in the beginning.

By
Europe. Minor company auction at beginning; mergers; D trains.

By
PnP - with Expansion.

8 out of 10
By
First auction off 15 minors that later can merge into the eight Corporations.

9 out of 10
By
I have now played this game over ten times and it has become one of my favorite 18xx games. I really like how the small companies form and are utlized for long term strategies. The only downside is that a first game of 18EU will take longer than a normal 18xx 'first game'. I have found that explaining overarching strategy during the rules explaination helps a great deal with the potential beginning game 'analysis paralysis'. Potential to increase runs each OR by 10 - 20 can lead to an analysis paralysis nightmare.

8 out of 10
By
The opening Minor Company auction has many critical decisions, which means beginners can get into trouble right out of the gate, but it results in a game that can vary dramatically from one playing to another. There's quite a bit of tactics in the struggle to make sure you get the most value out of your minor companies, and the question is how much that struggle will distract you from your long-term goals. Furthermore, once you're in trouble, it's very difficult to extract yourself and become a contender again. Another problem is that the end of the game isn't as interesting as the beginning. However, I have now played the variant in which you draft special powers, with the stronger powers having higher numbers, and then place companies in order in any open spot (rather than having them go where the numbers are marked on the board.) This creates more variety, both at the start and the end of the game, and also makes it easier for beginners by eliminating the initial auction.

7.5 out of 10
By
A very good 18xx. Seems both more interesting and shorter than most 18xxes, though more of the game then usual is in the early game. Edit 2007: Too much of the game is the initial auction, it seems. The initial order draw also persists in affecting the game for far too long

6 out of 10
By
18EU features a large initial auction with 15 minor companies. In theory, that should make games play out rather differently simply due to a different distribution of those companies. I'm not sure that really is true, however, since most of those minors have very clear "best" routes which channel the tracks in similar patterns. The rather static stock market (including the ability for companies to sell their own shares to the market) and the tile set are both pretty forgiving, with the exception of Y cities which can be used to create choke points. Overall, the game seems less dynamic than many other 18xx titles, and it ends sooner in the sense that little of particular interest happens in the later stages of the game.

By
PnP-Version

By
Keep

By
Should print this one...

By
PNP version. Beautiful construction with pics available.

6 out of 10
By
We used to play this a lot when it first came out, but I rarely see it played these days. The game has several good features: lots of combinations possible with the start packet of 15 minors, a flow from minors to majors, and route-building is just as important as the finacial aspects. The game does have some flaws: a fierce train rush (and possible poison 4-train), no compensation for minors unconnected to a major, and initial seating order can determine the game. Also, the 4-player game can be problematic at the start since 15 just doesn't divide by 4. Largely superceded by 18Ardennes.

7 out of 10
By
My biggest criticism is that the game can be won or lost on the initial auction- some experience is necessary to avoid handing someone the game (or losing it) before it even really starts. However, this is a minor criticism for a game with huge replayability. Chrome doesn't get in the way of the game as with some Hecht designs, although it does have the usual trappings of a Hecht design (operations matter much more than any stock shenanigans).

7.5 out of 10
By
This game seemed the least new player friendly of the 18xx games I've so far played, since it seemed like even more of the important decisions than usual happen right at the beginning. I didn't play with the special power cards, I'm really curious to see how those mix things up, though I don't see that eliminating my front loading concern to much. Still a lot of fun.

10 out of 10
By
Played multiple times. One of the best 18xx. Outstanding initial auction process, and very good replayability.

7 out of 10
By
Difficult to go bankrupt but very easy to screw up hopelessly. The outcome of the initial auction likely will have eradicated some player's chances. Getting no 3 trains or having to buy more than one 4 train is another killer. Finally, lots of prepaid markers and a restricted tile mix can end hopes as well. Even more than in other 18xx's it's only fun if you're on the right side of the stick. Here, you even don't have the hope of going bankrupt as your sucking companies can sell unsold shares to the pool to get additional money and locomotive prices aren't too high (800 for the 8 train as the largest train). Lots of unique design choices though and when things workout I can imagine that this could be one of the more satisfying 18xx's. Best with more players and has a comparably long play time.

5 out of 10
By
One of my top 5 18xx games in the number of plays, but not really in how much I appreciate the design. The minor company auction makes sure that the game doesn't get stale quickly. The game has a few problems though. The main one is that there's no "right" player count. In 3p, the initial random order selection basically also fixes the operating order of the major companies, so the player in the 3rd seat very often gets screwed when it comes to 3Ts. In 4p, it's incredibly hard to win as the player who ends up with only 3 minors, no matter how good. In 5p, it's basically impossible to win with just one company.

9 out of 10
By
Different viewpoint on 18xx -- corporations can only be started by exchanging minor companies, with the emphasis more on optimizing your runs rather than stock manipulation or aggressive track laying.

7.5 out of 10
By
PnP

By
Print , Cut, Cut, Cut and Play hecho el 26 de Enero 2014

6 out of 10
By
Interesting first play. I'd happily play again. But it didn't impress me as much as some other 18xx's I've played recently.

7 out of 10
By
18xx in Europe. The initial auction of the 15 minor companies is crucial; you can loose the game already at this stage (try to get two minors close or in connecting range of each other - try to get as much minor companies as you can get, while keeping the first guideline in mind - Benelux and Germany are the best starting locations; the south is poorer in cash return). As usual, try to swap money between (minor) companies to buy a 3 (or 4) train. Don't wait too long to merge your minor companies, because otherwise you'll get it really difficult to buy trains and control track. After the merge: go for one of the smaller permanent trains, but also aim for the 8 train. Timing: try to get priority deal when the last major companies come up for sale.

7.5 out of 10
By
A very interesting twist on the 18xx series. I like the 15 minors being absorbed by the corporations. This leaves the game very open and different every time you play. might even be intro into 18xx type of game

3 out of 10
By
One of my favorite 18xx games. This game features minor companies that can lay track and operate 2 trains. They are then used to open the major companies. Would see more play if not quite so long. Rating assumes there is enough time to play. Downside can be that the game is won and lost in the initial auction.

8 out of 10
By
Tentative rating after one play. Seems like a very good member of the 18XX family. A lot happens at start when there are 15 small companies, then it calms down a bit as they merge into corporations. The mountain chain felt quite useless, as there didn't seem any incentive to build through it.

By
Print & play

8 out of 10
By
Self printed and assembled from designer website. Word to the wise kids, spend the fifty dollars for the assembled version.~12 hours of work from download to playable... Thanks to deepthoughtgames for putting this one online.

By
DIY

8 out of 10
By
Several plays now, and I really like this one. Yes, the initial auction is important, but experienced players should know what works and what doesn't. Trouble is, that takes multiple plays, so this can get a bit one-sided.

7 out of 10
By
New players have to be careful with this one. I think they can be lost after the initial auction if they are not careful.

8.3 out of 10
By
A very interesting 18xx game with quite a few wrinkles even for experienced 18xx players. There is a dutch auction at the beginning of the game for minors. Working this auction properly is essential because these minors establish starting positions for your entire game. What this means is that your second game will be much better than your first! LOL. At this time, I think that 18EU has a lot of intensity and is one of my favorite 18xx games, but it is a longer game than for example 18Mex so this won't hit the table as often.

7 out of 10
By
rating based on 2 Rails plays. Still have not gotten my printed copy to the table. The starting auction is interesting. The game is engaging through the midgame, but the end game seems to bog down. Feels like it is pretty much decided by mid-game and is just playing itself out. Not my favorite 18xx title, but one that I wouldn't turn down.

7 out of 10
By
The starting auction plays a huge role - perhaps too big. But I really like the map and the mechanics of forming corporations by merging minors into them.

6 out of 10
By
Home-made print-n-play version. Intriguing. The initial stock round means a lot and is really difficult for new players to understand, which makes 18EU a bit complicated. The balance between Paris, Berlin and south of the Alps is questionable. I will need to play this one a bit more! Indifferent.

5 out of 10
By
Not my favorite 18XX, by FAR.

5 out of 10
By
Not a huge 18xx fan but this is one of the better one's I've tried. Flexible map, hard to get blocked too much and fun bidding for minors at the start...just be careful not to spend to much or your whole game will be ruined...enjoyment and length not in balance....6-7 hours+ if new players

By
I want to make myself soon

5 out of 10
By
I enjoyed the game after finishing this game; however, first time out, I was confused since it was my first 18xx game and I had a hard time seeing how everything work together for long term growth. Although I ended up winning in the end by concentrating all my efforts on one company (which was the strongest the whole game) and buying 40% of the shares of all the strongest rivals. I was also able to ruin the plans of all the other players with an early first rust. It was my first time out so it was a "friendly" game but if I played it again I think I would be able to play very competitively; however, the fun to time ratio was not good so I will likely try Chicago Express before I play this again.

9.5 out of 10
By
THE BEST 18XX

8 out of 10
By
An excellent 18xx variant. Not nearly as brutal, fun to watch develop. A bit quicker than some of the others.

By
Kit

6 out of 10
By
Nice, simple 18xx. Similar to 1830 complexity, minus the privates, plus a few extra features: *Pullman cars (double the value of one city) *Half dividends, *Minor companies (they only lay yellow tiles and always pay a half dividend, no stock value, may be traded in for a share of a regular company. incremental capitalisation, simpler track tiles, *red to red runs, *Y-cities, *ports (just like a $10 town) and some other minor tweaks. The midgame does feel less dynamic/interesting than 1830.

8 out of 10
By
This is an good route building 18xx with a "minor companies merging into majors" theme. Its not a stock-market game (I've never seen a company dump). I really like train games that stand on a merger mechanic like this. 18EU seems to be on of the simplest of such games, and is focused most directly on the merger theme. Actually, it has the simplest ruleset of [i]any[/i] 18xx that I know of. My copy is home made. Thanks to Deep Thought for making this available for print and play.

8 out of 10
By
Playtime: ~3-4 hours Comment: This one is unique. It's got some mergers, plenty of starting variability and most of the companies feel like their a good starting point. The game however is a bear to first get into. Not knowing how the game plays out until your about 1/2 way through makes this game one of the more steeper ones to first learn. I'd only bring this out with experienced players. We'll see how the train rush feels in this game. I got screwed over the first game of it, but I'm not sure how well that translates to an actual game of it. Optimal Player Count: 4 Plays well with all counts except for 2. Typically with 18xx games you'll want 1 player less than max and 1 player more than minimum.

7 out of 10
By
A good game, but the early game is much more exciting and seems to be decisive to positioning in the endgame.

7 out of 10
By
have files - need to build

By
It's too long, the private auction can determine the winner before you even lay any track, and the game, I'm sorry, simply doesn’t work out of the box with 4p since there are only 15 minors and whoever only gets 3 is at a serious disadvantage. The minor auction is also interminably long, which is unacceptable given how long and tedious and processional the rest of the game is. I don't like how stocks fall one value no matter how many shares are sold, and I don't like how the game is really "About" maneuvering to get these massive E-W runs that pay out huge sums. Some people enjoy this game, but it really spotlights everything I don't really enjoy about 18xx, as I'm less interested in the operational aspects of the genre. 18xx has the reputation of being "long" and "mathy," and to me that is more evident in the operational games (i.e., the ones where you have to run good companies and make your money through dividend payouts, with little cross-investing and stock value manipulation). The problem is that operational games lack the same dynamic range that the more stock-centric games have. Operational games, or games that are "about" timing the mergers of minors into majors, simply have to be in the 2-3 hour range for me. There are too many 4-6 hour richer, more dynamic 18xx games that I'd choose over this one.

7 out of 10
By
Smorgasbord 18xx. Lots of chrome and bizarre rules that make a coherent and very playable whole! This isn't in the same league as my favourite 18xx titles: 1841 and 1830. By far the best parts of this game: * The initial auction is a lot of fun! I prefer the idea of auctioning minor corporations that differ only by geographical location and turn order. I think it's much more elegant than private companies whose special rules are easily forgotten since those are generally used once per game. * Because there are so many running corporations at the beginning of the game, the opening game is quick (as opposed to many other 18xx titles) * The large amount of running corporations at the start of the game means that players can indulge in 18xx style money laundering right from the start (i.e. being able to transfer assets from one corporation to another). This is by far my favourite aspect of 18xx games. I thought much of the chrome of 18EU wouldn't add much to the game, but I was pleasantly surprised this was not the case: * The Pullman cars added an interesting decision mid-game where you would have to choose between dumping that and an old train. What's even more interesting is that Pullman cars are most useful at the beginning at the end, but the decision to dump them happens at mid-game. * Red-to-red bonuses based on the number of your tokens along the route make track laying even more competitive. * The "simplified" tracks aren't that simple! The upgrade paths of many of the tiles (in particular, the Y cities) make track laying quite tricky. * Half-dividends and the ability for corporations to buy and sell their own stocks allow you to raise money quickly without having to resort to emergency money raising. However, my favourite 18xx tiles offer a more meatier challenge than 18EU (although I'm not one to judge since I came in last place in my first game). * Although auctioning the fifteen minor corporations is a lot of fun, operating them isn't (until you start merging them into other corporations). Minors are restricted to playing only yellow tiles. Yes, this enables the board to fill up faster with yellow tiles, but I prefer the auction for full-fledged corporations in 1841, in which you are faced with very meaty decisions right from the first operating round. * 18EU majors are partially capitalized (before phase 5), but they cannot operate until 50% of their shares are in players' hands. I prefer the tension that 1856 creates in which corporations can operate with as little as two shares. Consequently, in 1856. corporations are constantly trying to get their shares sold. In addition, in 18EU, dividends from unsold shares go in the corporation's treasury, providing corporations a slightly bigger cushion if they are unable to get all their shares sold. * Note that many other 18xx games such as 1830 prevent corporations from starting until they have at least 50% of their shares sold. What makes 18EU less exciting than 1830 -- but more forgiving -- is that the trains in 18EU are much cheaper. It appears easier to have all corporations at their train limit earlier in the game. This enables players to build up some capital to prepare for a new corporation starting, that new corporation buying a train, and finally the rusting of old trains to create space for new and better ones. * In addition, the mergers in 18EU are limited to minors merging into a major only when the major starts, or at the beginning of phase 5. I much prefer the freedom of 1841 that allows mergers anytime, or in 1856, in which in debt corporations must merge into the CGR at a specific time in the game, which adds such a huge strategic and narrative force to the game. * Track laying is far less frustrating, but less challenging, since it's much easier to build around cities. Out of all 18xx games I've played, I prefer 1856's track laying since it offers a board with a relatively high density of cities and towns and track tile shortages. So 18EU falls in an uncomfortable middle region: it's too long to play casually. I often play games at a university cafeteria on weekends with a gaming group. It's easier to spontaneously suggest a shorter 18xx title like 1830 or 18AL (if I actually had a copy) than 18EU, which lasts about 6h. (There is no way I'll find the time to play 18EU often enough to drop this to 3h.) But if I want to plan an entire game of 18xx, I'd rather play a meatier one like 1856 or 1841.

8.5 out of 10
By
PnP

9.5 out of 10
By
Looking for the commercially purchased version.

10 out of 10
By
18xx are great games. Lot's of starting companies (lots). Lots of opportunities to start your own company. Definite distinction between opening and end game (like in most/all 18xx, but here it definitely shows in stock policy). Crazy route building because of the large map. A game that is so great the headaches are included in the box.

By
50

7.5 out of 10
By
The opening auction is too long for PBEM

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qty 1 of 18EU (Map:mntreal-mc; Tiles:cut/lam; Certs:cut; Certs:lam; Ch/Msc:cut; Ch/Msc:lam; Tok:mnt; Box:2-pc) money not ordered

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Deep Thought Games: order #4339 * 2015-07-03: behind 1,134 games * 2015-12-14: behind 1,119 games * 2016-02-16: behind 1,115 games * 2016-06-13: behind 1,110 games * 2016-12-07: behind 1,106 games

8 out of 10
By
Initial auction is the most important/interesting part of the game. Take a look at the minor companies guide posted on the 18xx Yahoo Group.

7 out of 10
By
Decent but somewhat outdated 18xx title. The game is mostly won/lost based on the initial auction of the minors.

7 out of 10
By
An interesting 18xx variant that works a bit differently than most - enjoyable but not as much as other games in the series. Adding to my "to build" list. Maybe after 18AL.

By
PnP
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