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Thursday, September 24, 2015

Ulcers (1969)

Ulcers (1969)

Ratings

5.40942 out of 10 with 138 ratings
Board Game Rank: 12281

Description

This game's theme is fairly unique: you are trying to assemble a full staff of personnel (two secretaries, two salesmen, one sales manager, one vice-president and one president) to run your company. The problem is there aren't enough available in total for more than one company to achieve that goal. You win by assembling a full staff and making it safely around to a New Fiscal Year (the "Go" square, in other words).

As you move about the (bilingual, two-sided) board, you'll have opportunities to hire or raid competing companies. You must decide how much to pay your people --not enough and they'll switch companies, too much and your company will go bankrupt. Managing your money is an important aspect of the game but it isn't the victory condition.

Amusingly, the early editions had all-female secretaries and all-male higher personnel; later editions kept the illustrations but shuffled them throughout the positions.

From Waddington ad: "Ulcers is the big business game that recognizes an important business fact: PEOPLE are among a company's most valuable assets. And people are why executives get ULCERS. Suppose you had to form a company and had to hire a staff of executives, managers,salesmen and secretaries. You probably think it would be easy but it isn't. ULCRES puts you in the owners chair. You form the company, hire the staff and you try to keep them."

Man O' War (1993)

Man O' War (1993)

Ratings

7.14986 out of 10 with 674 ratings
Board Game Rank: 1577
War Game Rank: 242
Thematic Rank: 272

Description

Man O' War is the game of Raging Sea Battles in the Warhammer World. As an admiral of an ocean-going war fleet you must command your ships - which can be either squadrons of Ships of the Line or heavily armored Men O' War, in the battle for supremacy of the high seas.

Players choose fleets from the multitude of races of the Warhammer world. Every ship is represented by a template showing individual areas, each with a description of the items (masts, cannons etc.) in those areas - as well as the damage that they can take before being destroyed. Each location has a value that must be rolled to hit that area when attacked, along with another value that can be rolled by the defending player to possibly prevent any damage that might occur. Ships are classified as Ship of the Line (SOL) - which are designed to move as a group of three (each moving and fighting to completion before continuing on with the next ship in the squadron), a Man O' War (MOW)- which are single ships that are much larger, more powerful and crewed by larger numbers than a single SOL classed ship, or finally as an Independent (IND) - which are used individually like a Man O' War but are more in line in strength and abilities to that of a Ship of the Line.

At the beginning of each turn, players determine Initiative by each rolling a die which determines either who will go 1st in each phase - if the numbers are different, or how the wind direction changes if they both roll the same number. If the wind changes, the initiative roll and resolution is repeated until one player wins the die roll.

Players then conduct the Magic Phase with each Admiral having his Wizard make one spell attempt if desired. If a spell is successful, the other player can try and dispel that cast spell if they have a corresponding type of magic to make the attempt.

Next comes the Battle phase which is based on the previously determined initiative roll and players alternate between phases of Movement/Combat, each choosing a single MOW, IND or SOL Squadron and then conducting movement and making attacks before passing the turn sequence back to their opponent. This process continues until all ships have moved on both sides. Once that has occurred, the turn is over and a series of quick turn ending/record keeping events occurs before moving to the next turn. Game play continues for a predetermined time or until one side is destroyed, surrenders or flees the battlefield.

There were two separate expansions to the main game. The first was Plaguefleet which added rules and templates for the Chaos fleets of Khorne, Slaanesh, Tzeentch and Nurgle (collectively known as a Plaguefleet), the Skaven and finally the Chaos Dwarfs. This expansion effectively doubled the number of available fleets for the game. This expansion also included color templates for the original 6 races as well (Imperial, Bretonnian, Dwarf, High Elf, Dark Elf and Orc).

The 2nd expansion Sea of Blood mainly introduced new rules for Airpower, Sea Monsters & Beasts and Allies as well as new ships for the Dwarfs and Imperial fleets. The inclusion of the Norse fleet wrapped up the content for this expansion.

Finally, complete rules for an Undead fleet - as well as some expansion rules for a few of the other races, were included in several of the issues of Game Workshop's Citadel Journal magazine.

A wide variety of miniatures were produced to represent the many ships detailed in the main game and expansion sets but no miniatures were ever officially made for the Undead fleet. Assembling and painting the miniatures gave the game a feeling of being "collectible" as well as being a hobby in itself. Many players have created customized ships and new ships (and even complete fleets) including rules, ships templates and completed miniatures. The largest collection of these creations is housed at the Yahoo group Sea of Claws.

Pirate Island (1984)

Pirate Island (1984)

Ratings

4.38404 out of 10 with 47 ratings
Board Game Rank: 13148

Description

Players seek to land their pirate-filled boats on Pirate Island and secure the treasure chests scattered about.

Skyline (1988)

Skyline (1988)

Ratings

4.47727 out of 10 with 22 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Abstract Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Players take turns moving their own Helicopter pawn around the board to land on an unoccupied square. Individual board squares may be colored to match one player’s color, or in a neutral color. The color of the landing site indicates which player (whether or not that is the active player) places one floor of a new building at this square.

The active player must then pay points to owners of all buildings over which the Helicopter has just flown. The pay rate is based on the total floor count for each color involved, and escalates steeply with increased floor count.

Turn ends with one additional floor of the appropriate color being added to each building flown over.

Some players may be eliminated early when unable to pay. Game ends when one player cannot move (cannot reach an empty square), or when one player has no more floors to place. Player with the most points wins.

Colony (2001)

Colony (2001)

Ratings

4.55172 out of 10 with 29 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

This game was developed as a German / English / French joint venture to develop an educational game about colonialism.

Each player is a colonial power, all arriving on the same continent at the same time. The continent is divided into regions, most of which are coastal. Each player starts with one settlement, a 'resource' and a port somewhere on the coast. A turn consists of simultaneously selecting an action (at the start from four: colonise, build ship, build port, explore/prospect) Then in turn - Collect Income; Execute action; Take and execute an event card. The length of an epoch is governed by the number of event cards, so the more players, the fewer actions you get.The victor is the player with the most money at the end of the last epoch.

Charmed: The Book of Shadows (2001)

Charmed: The Book of Shadows (2001)

Ratings

3.89167 out of 10 with 24 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Based on the TV series. This seems to be an original Tilsit production. Clash of Arms released the English edition titled Charmed: The Book of Shadows.

Here's a translation of Tilsit's blurb:

The Power of the Three.
The Book of Shadows is a source of great mystical power. In the hands of a good witch, it can be used to banish a great number of evils. In the hands of a demon, however, the Book's powers will be used for destruction and could be the downfall of humanity. The Halliwell sisters are the wardens of the Book and use it to combat the forces of darkness. Hordes of demons covet the Book, hoping to rule the world with its help. The Halliwell sisters, with the help of Leo, the Being of Light, must do all they can to keep the Book of Shadows from falling in demonic hands. Incarnate Prue, Phoebe, Piper and Leo in their struggle for the protection of the Book of Shadows.

Sherlock Holmes Consulting Detective: The Thames Murders & Other Cases (1981)

Sherlock Holmes Consulting Detective: The Thames Murders & Other Cases (1981)

Ratings

7.84293 out of 10 with 9440 ratings
Board Game Rank: 55
Thematic Rank: 16

Description

Have you ever had the desire to walk the streets of Victorian London with Sherlock Holmes in search of Professor Moriarty? To search the docks for the giant rat of Sumatra? To walk up Baker Street as the fog is rolling in and hear Holmes cry out, "Come, Watson, come! The game is afoot!"? Now you can! You can enter the opium den beneath the Bar of Gold, but beware, that may be Colonel Sebastian Moran lurking around the corner. You can capture the mystery and excitement of Holmes' London in this challenging and informative game. You, the player, will match your deductive abilities against your opponents and the master sleuth himself, Sherlock Holmes.

In Sherlock Holmes Consulting Detective, you are presented with a mystery to solve, and it is then up to you to trace the threads of evidence through the byways and mansions of nineteenth century London. You will interview suspects, search the newspapers for clues, and put together the facts to reach a solution.

Why were two lions murdered in Hyde Park? Who is responsible for the missing paintings from the National Gallery? Who murdered Oswald Mason and why? These are just a few of the cases that will challenge your ingenuity and deductive abilities.

This is not a board game: No dice, no luck, but a challenge to your mental ability. The game has been thoroughly researched for Holmesian and Victorian accuracy so as to capture a feeling of that bygone era.

Playboss (1969)

Playboss (1969)

Ratings

6.1367 out of 10 with 94 ratings
Board Game Rank: 7923

Description

Playboss is an exciting board-game that simulates the many real-life business situations in which directors and managers make their decisions. Each player in this game is a businessman who has the opportunity of buying machines and raw materials, selling his products, paying taxes, raising loans or introducing rationalization schemes, and generally experiencing the ups and downs of everyday business life.

Before starting, players agree the duration of the game. The player with the greatest net assets at the end of the game is the winner.

The board comprises a circuit of 42 spaces of 5 different types: decision spaces on which the player can choose to buy raw material, purchase capital equipment, manufacture goods or sell goods, research & development spaces which allow investment for productivity improvement or risk reduction, risk spaces which require the drawing of a risk card, additional cost spaces, and depreciation spaces.

Each player has a factory card on which are placed machines, computers, raw materials and finished goods. At the start of the game, priced slots in the center of the board are filled with the goods: these slots are emptied and filled as goods are bought as raw material and sold as finished goods. The buying and selling price is determined by the next available filled or empty slots, though players can bid competitively for the purchase or sale.

The Economy Game uses the basic mechanism and many features.

Dark Heaven Apocalypse (1988)

Dark Heaven Apocalypse (1988)

Ratings

5.1 out of 10 with 5 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
War Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Dark Heaven: Apocalypse (DH:A) is a miniatures game set in the fantasy world of Adon. Players assume the roles of commanders of armies of fantastic races such as humans, vampires, dwarves, elves, etc., fighting among themselves and against the ultimate villains, the Dire-Dead, who are led by the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse.

In DH:A, the 10-sided die is used to generate the random results to determine the outcome of battles, spells, and incidents. Players build up armies of equivalent point values to fight each other. The point value of a basic unit can be cheap, but can be increased by giving the unit better weapons, skills and spells. Players are free to customize the standard units presented in the rulebook or create their own. Rules also cover artillery, morale, chariots and elephants.

The battles are split into turns, which are further split into class movement phases (where increasingly more mobile units act ahead of slower ones). During a turn, Class 1 units (the most mobile) act first. The player who won the roll for initiative at the start of the turn enacts his or her orders for her Class 1 units before the opponent moves theirs. They then repeat the same for their Class 2, Class 3, and lastly Class 4 units. Individual figures can be grouped together with a leader in combat, supporting their leader in its fight and dying together with it if its roll fails against an opponent.

The winning conditions for a battle can include total destruction of the enemy, seizing an objective, or fleeing the battlefield after being surrounded.

Caverns Deep (1980)

Caverns Deep (1980)

Ratings

4.75 out of 10 with 10 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

The game of life-or-death combat between the dwarves and their mortal enemies, the goblins. The dwarves are put to the ultimate test in a struggle deep within the earth, in subterranean pasageways and tunnels.

Liberté (2001)

Liberté (2001)

Ratings

7.18931 out of 10 with 2276 ratings
Board Game Rank: 609
Strategy Game Rank: 346

Description

Liberté covers the French Revolution from 1789 and the meeting of the Estates General to the Directory and Bonaparte’s coup d’état in 1799.
The game is played in four turns. In each turn there will be a variable number of rounds, followed by an election to see which faction becomes the government. There are three factions, the Radicals (red), the Moderates (blue), and the Royalists (white). The most common action is for a player to place faction blocks on the board. He shows he controls these blocks by placing one of his tokens on top of the stack.

The cards are divided into two sets, set 'A' and 'B'. The 'A' deck is used first and tends to favor the moderates and Royalists. Once this deck has been exhausted the 'B' deck comes into play, which tends to favor the radicals.

The election is triggered when all of one type of faction block has been exhausted. The faction blocks will determine which faction forms the next government. Players are attempting to score victory points by having the most influence in the government and opposition. Points can also be picked up in later turns for being the general in charge at a victorious battle, and for winning elections in specific provinces.

Normally the player with the most victory points will win. However, there are two sudden death game end conditions that may alter the outcome. The first is a radical electoral landslide, triggered by the red faction gaining 17 or more votes. The second is successful Royalist counter-revolution, precipitated by Royalist control of seven counter-revolutionary provinces. In both cases, victory is determined by a different set of criteria, in which accrued victory points do not count. The player who is ahead on points must be aware that one mistake could lead to defeat at the hands of the Jacobins or Royalists!

It is likely that you will never have played a game quite like this one and you may find yourself wondering what strategies to employ. Do not despair! Once you have completed your first game you will realize that amongst the apparent chaos of the game there are many opportunities for long-term planning.

Liberté is #6 in the Valley Games Classic Line

Himmel und Hölle (2001)

Himmel und Hölle (2001)

Ratings

5.16667 out of 10 with 6 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Abstract Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

English title: Heaven and Hell

The publisher's annual downloadable game for 2001 depicts the eternal battle between Heaven and Hell, played out on a 10 x 3 square grid. Each player's forces are represented by dice and their movements limited by player action points, the number of points available being dictated by the number of dice the player has in the play area. Dice gain strength by winning conflicts, but may may voluntarily reduce strength in order to move faster. Conflict is resolved by a combination of dice strength and cardplay. The player who manages to get the strongest dice into his opponent's home area wins.

Massai (1993)

Massai (1993)

Ratings

5.5 out of 10 with 10 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Abstract Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Contents
1 Rulebook
1 Game board
15 Light color wooden chips (huts)
15 Dark color wooden chips (huts)
8 Wooden yellow pawns (guards)
2 Wooden red pawns (guards)
2 Sheets of tactics

Introduction
This year the Massai celebrate the beginning of the rainy season with a big party. The best architects in the two neighboring villages show up at the dry river bed and will try to join the two towns together with a series of huts.. The first who manages to do so will become the architect of the year.

Each player receives 15 huts of his/her color, 4 yellow pawns used as guards in order to protect some of the huts. and 1 red pawn and 1 tactic sheet which contains the plan for the game seen from either side of the board. Each player secretly sets up his huts on a tactic sheet. Once both players have done this the tactic sheets are exposed and then the huts are transferred from the tactic sheet to the board.

Each player has two possible moves on his turn. He may either build a new hut or he may attack an opponent's hut.

In order to win an architect must establish an uninterrupted chain of 6 huts between the 2 dry river beds or an architect can also win if his opponent has no huts on the game board.

This game is part of the Abacus wood box series.

Godsfire (1976)

Godsfire (1976)

Ratings

5.66804 out of 10 with 97 ratings
Board Game Rank: 10761
War Game Rank: 2271

Description

Space conquest game with politics, government and production rules. Three dimensional movement is simulated by showing multiple levels within each hex, a system later used by Holy War.

Published by Metagaming in two versions, the first in a ziplock bag and the second in a box. Later re-published by Task Force Games.

Has counters for up to 8 players in the Metagaming version (the TFG version has counters for 4, but more were available as an expansion). The rules accommodate up to 15 players.

Global Survival (1992)

Global Survival (1992)

Ratings

1.8385 out of 10 with 113 ratings
Board Game Rank: 13901

Description

This game features players buying countries based on where their pawns land on a Monopoly-style board. A large deck of cards describes various world events that either help or hinder owners of the affected countries.

Global Chess (1997)

Global Chess (1997)

Ratings

6.21875 out of 10 with 16 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Abstract Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Global Chess is pure chess with 64 squares, traditional pieces and traditional moves. The game of chess was developed when armies fought on open fields in distinct formations and the entire battle could be seen from a single vantage point. As warefare and technology have advanced, battles are fought over the limb of the horizon with no edges to the battlefield. This is the transformational premise of Global Chess. There is no backline and no sideline on the Global Chess board. There is nowhere to hide.

Think of a 64 square chessboard wrapped around a globe. Now you can play chess around a sphere with no edges to the game. The problem is that it's difficult to see all the squares at the same time and understand your options. The Global Chess game separates the globe at the equator and flattens them into hemispheres that are geared together. By turning the game you rotate the hemispheres against each other to examine the crossing point of a piece in it's possible trajectories across the hemisphere or through the poles. Turning the board does not alter the relationship of the game pieces to each other.

The easy to understand rules of chess as they pertain to a global playing surface are explained in text and graphic form. The possible strategy is yet to be written! The board is annotated to record game play.

Express Chess (1996)

Express Chess (1996)

Ratings

4.58333 out of 10 with 24 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Abstract Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Based on when Blackbox originally put it out, this could be considered Chess's answer to collectible card games. Cards represent typical chess pieces, and the board is defined by the rows of cards originally laid out. Throughout the game players capture each others' pieces as in normal chess, but can continually add to the board from the cards they hold in their hands.

Additional rules, such as the pawn combo (after moving a pawn, you can make a second move through or into the vacated space), add new elements over classic chess. Pawn combos together with piece limits and placement restrictions serve to balance the value of the different pieces. A small number of cards have special powers on them, further changing the rules of the game.

Equate (1996)

Equate (1996)

Ratings

5.50783 out of 10 with 83 ratings
Board Game Rank: 11515

Description

"Scrabble with math" is how this game is generally described, and the description is apt. The board is much like a Scrabble board, including spaces equivalent to "double-word score" and "triple-letter score". The difference is that, instead of placing words formed of letters, players of Equate place equations formed of numbers and symbols on the board. The beginners game (consisting mostly of addition and subtraction of integers) is pretty simple, but the standard game, bringing in multiplication, division, and fractions, can be something of a brain-burner.

1-2-3 Go! (1970)

1-2-3 Go! (1970)

Ratings

5.75 out of 10 with 4 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Children's Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

A child's first game. fun with numbers.

A children's game for two players for teaching numbers up to 6.

On their turn the child throws the 1-2-3 dice, and matches it with the appropriate cylinder, then places it on the pins on their track. When the track is finished, the player wins.

There is also an advanced version with a normal 6-sided dice, and the child has to combine cylinder shapes to cover the appropriate number of pins. There is a special plastic board to enable them to do this.

Goldrush-City (2001)

Goldrush-City (2001)

Ratings

4.6 out of 10 with 34 ratings
Board Game Rank: 12696

Description

Premiering at Essen 2001, a game of gold digging and city building. Players take turns revealing event, resource and bandit cards from the deck. After the events are resolved, the players bid for the resources. Then the active player uses his action points and resources to acquire building permits, acquire tools or erect buildings which differ in their resource costs and advantages conferred. Bandits may also be used to further the player's goal, but may backfire if the dice are not friendly. Then players engage in a subgame somewhat akin to Blackjack -- but with a greater range of results -- to distribute gold useful for the next auction. What's tricky is to take in more gold diggers than anyone else, but not to take so many that the ensuing brawl wipes out all of the profits. The eventual winner is the player who has managed to construct the best set of buildings with bonuses for achieving multiple buildings of the same type. This player is elected Mayor of Goldrush City.

Created by the designer of Strand-Cup.

Saloon (2001)

Saloon (2001)

Ratings

4.8544 out of 10 with 100 ratings
Board Game Rank: 13310

Description

Premiering at Essen 2001, a card game of brawling in a Saloon of the Old West. The attacker plays his cards and the defender responds. The first noninvolved player to get a card to the table can throw in a punch as well. If any of the attack gets through, the defender takes some knock out points. But if he's not yet in Dreamland, now he gets the turn to strike back, or does he find a new target? Plenty of warping effects on these easy-to-explain rules and interesting flavor are added by cards such as the roundhouse, whiskey bottle, flying through the window, beer barrel, piano player, Oopsadaisy and the dreaded bartender (he comes with a club). Players gradually get knocked out until there is only one brawler left standing, the winner.

Components include 6 Schläger ["Brawler"] cards (one for each player), 54 Saloon cards (24 Attack cards, 8 Item cards, 6 Hit cards, 3 Help cards, 8 Defense cards, 5 Event cards).

Boggle Bowl (1987)

Boggle Bowl (1987)

Ratings

5.80912 out of 10 with 68 ratings
Board Game Rank: 10208

Description

In this quick and fun word game, players roll cupfuls of letter-dice and race to solve various word challenges. When the timer runs out, whoever has used the most letters gets to move the common marker closer to his area of the board. The farther along the marker is when the player scores, the more points he gets. The position of the marker on the board also determines the nature of the next contest.

Hispania (1994)

Hispania (1994)

Ratings

6.71444 out of 10 with 135 ratings
Board Game Rank: 4619
War Game Rank: 859

Description

January 1st, 1492 AD: With the fall of Grenada, the last remaining Islamic stronghold in Spain, 2000 years of an highly eventfull epic are ended. Time and again, large-scale invasions from Africa or France had aimed at ousting or submitting the tribes and peoples already settled there.

Hispania gives four to five players a chance to re-enact this dramatic period of history, setting out fom Carthage in the fourth century BC, following the footsteps of Roman, Germanic, Byzantine and Muslim conquerors, and finally taking part in the early reconquista when the Christian kingdoms of Castile, Leon and Aragon, won Spain back from the "Infidels".

Hispania takes the basic system of Britannia and re-locates it to Ancient and Medieval Spain, adding and changing some rules along the way. The actual time period covered is 320 BC to 1220 AD.

In Hispania, the players try to outbid each other in an auction for up to 30 different tribes and peoples. The auction system guarantees that each game is quite unlike the previous one. each time the players lead different peoples and adjust to their respective victory conditions, all of which have been modeled on historical requirements.

Special unit types include Knights, Castles and Elites. Several nations undergo transformations, for example the Romans becoming Hispano-Romans. Naval invasions are allowed for some powers.

The game includes:

640 counters (4 countersheets)
1 map (84 x 59 cm - 33 x 23.2 in) - map has two versions: 1994 and 1996 editions
1 rule booklet (24 pages)
5 scenarios:
320 BC to 961 AD (13 turns)
205 BC to 1030 AD (12 turns)
205 BC to 1100 AD (16 turns)
320 BC to 1100 AD (19 turns)
320 BC to 1220 AD (21 turns)

4 player's aids
2 dices (10 sided)




(source: back of the box, Azure Wish edition and user's description)

The Grand Alchemist (2000)

The Grand Alchemist (2000)

Ratings

4.88307 out of 10 with 41 ratings
Board Game Rank: 12577

Description

You are living in the middle of the Renaissance, a period in which the greatest minds were obsessed with alchemy. If you want to become the Grand Alchemist you must gather the necessary components in order to create the magical formula. You must also study in the great European cities to increase your alchemical knowledge. But beware! The Grand Inquisitor is hunting you, and other alchemist scheme against you. Be the first to discover the secret and transmute common metal into gold.

General Mechanics:
You control an alchemist and two apprentices. They will move around a map of Europe to various cities and gather knowledge cards. Getting a certain number allows you to attempt a transmutation. Keep the location of your secret lab from the Grand Inquisitor and other players to avoid going to trial (jail) and losing knowledge cards. Event cards in the game allow you to search, protect yourself, move further, steal from other players, take shortcuts, increase your strength in a fight, etc. The final objective is to successfully complete enough transmutations to collect 5 bars of gold.

Doctor Faust (1990)

Doctor Faust (1990)

Ratings

5.16902 out of 10 with 82 ratings
Board Game Rank: 12513

Description

Players are devils vying for Dr. Faust's soul in this beautifully-produced (winning the SdJ Special Award for Beautiful Game) and fairly abstract game.

The Chicago Way (2000)

The Chicago Way (2000)

Ratings

3.26296 out of 10 with 27 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

In The Chicago Way, players visit the various neighborhoods of Chicago to gain influence over the city's political bosses.

Chaos Tiles (1999)

Chaos Tiles (1999)

Ratings

5.24146 out of 10 with 41 ratings
Board Game Rank: 11903
Abstract Game Rank: 719

Description

Emerging from a mathematical puzzles background, Chaos Tiles can be described as a dominoes-like brain-burner.

Casanova (1990)

Casanova (1990)

Ratings

4.57857 out of 10 with 14 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Venice, Italy , 1756. Casanova has escaped from the dungeon! Some italian ladies in love plus their chambermaids start a search to rescue the fugitive from the bloodhounds of the doge.

Casanova has disguised himself with women's attire (a pin is inserted into one of ten pairs of women playing pieces - it can only be felt or seen from the underside of the playing pieces). It is the task of the players to secretly figure out, under which pair of women Casanova hides, to get him into the player's palazzo via a gondola, and finally to bribe the doge to make sure Casanova can escape into freedom.

1 playing board
10 plastic figures
1 Casanova marking pin
12 plastic gondolas
5 colored necklaces (in fact small metal rings)
5 jewellery cards

Why (1958)

Why (1958)

Ratings

5.69539 out of 10 with 76 ratings
Board Game Rank: 10562

Description

"Alfred Hitchcock presents...The Game of Why"

Once upon a time, six people on their way to a costume party took shelter from a storm in a haunted house...And were never seen alive since. But they still haunt the house. You must try to find out who was murdered, by what means and why.

The cards include Motive cards, No Clue cards and a single "It's a Mystery to Me" card. In addition, there are cards that can be assembled side by side to form larger pictures: the six guests (Cleopatra, Napoleon, etc. --they were costumed, you see; in four pieces), four weapons (also in four pieces) and Alfred Hitchcock (in six pieces). Seven cards are dealt to each player, the rest into the house's rooms. You enter a room by exact count, except that a 7, 11 or doubles allows you to go directly to the spot of your choice. When you reach a room, you pick up the top card there and discard either it or another card from your hand to the "Lawn" --off the board. These cards are laid face down without overlapping each other but are shown to the other players as they're laid down. Later, you may try to recover a Lawn card by showing a card from your hand of the appropriate type (a piece of a guest, for example) and then pointing to a Lawn card and picking it up. If you remembered right, you may repeat the procedure. You can also claim cards from other players by meeting them in the house and "accusing them" of withholding a particular card (this is what the No Clue cards are defence for). Once the rooms are empty, everyone gathers in the hall and play is speeded up.

First player to assemble a Ghost, Weapon and Motive OR Alfred and "It's a Mystery to Me" wins.

Flipop (1998)

Flipop (1998)

Ratings

6.5 out of 10 with 11 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Abstract Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

The Flipop board consists of a 5x5 grid of spaces. In each of the 16 intersections between four spaces, there is a post holding a door that can swing around so that it blocks access between any adjacent two spaces of the four spaces around it. Each player has five balls on his side of the board. The object is to move the balls across the board, at which point they are removed from the game. To move, you must push a ball through a door. If there is a ball in the space beyond the door, it will be pushed -- this can cascade indefinitely. But a move is only legal as long as each ball lands either in an empty space or goes through another door -- balls cannot touch each other. The winner is either the first person to remove all his balls from the board, or the player with the fewest balls left when no legal moves remain.

Game of the States (1940)

Game of the States (1940)

Ratings

4.72668 out of 10 with 150 ratings
Board Game Rank: 13674
Children's Game Rank: 593
Family Game Rank: 1518

Description

This game teaches the location of each of the states, the capital city, its important industries and products, which the players buy and sell. The object of the game is to buy a product in one state and haul it on a truck to another state where you try to sell it at a profit. "Who Sells the Most From Coast to Coast?"

Journey Through Europe (1954)

Journey Through Europe (1954)

Ratings

4.93936 out of 10 with 296 ratings
Board Game Rank: 13745
Family Game Rank: 1528

Description

A travelling game. Each player has a home city and draws 6 cards for other cities that they must visit by a combination of land, sea and air travel. A die is used to move, but players choose their routes. The limitation of using only one mode of transportation per turn increases the analysis and decisions a bit more. The first player to visit all their cities and return home wins.

Viking Gods (1982)

Viking Gods (1982)

Ratings

6.06818 out of 10 with 110 ratings
Board Game Rank: 8451
War Game Rank: 1929

Description

A wargame simulating the battle of Ragnarök between Odin and the other Gods of Asgard and Loki and the Forces of Chaos.

Zaxxon (1982)

Zaxxon (1982)

Ratings

4.09491 out of 10 with 109 ratings
Board Game Rank: 13729
Children's Game Rank: 621

Description

The galaxy is in peril! The evil robot Zaxxon and its legion of followers have conquered an asteroid belt! It's your job to ward off this threat before it's too late.
Published in 1983, the Zaxxon Board Game was one of Milton Bradley’s numerous attempts to translate video games to board games.

HOW TO PLAY THE GAME:
1. ROLLING THE DIE: both players roll their die AT THE SAME TIME. Reroll the die if there is a tie. On EACH turn, the player rolling the Lower Number on the die ALWAYS plays first. Then the player rolling the Higher Number plays second.
2. USING THE SPINNER: the player rolling the Lower Number spins the spinner. The spinner controls enemy fire directed at fighter planes from missile silos and gun turrets (later in the game the spinner will also control the movement of Zaxxon). When RED is spun, any plane that is in or enters a missile silo area CONTAINING A MISSILE SILO is shot down and returned to its home base. When BLUE is spun, any plane that is in a gun turret area CONTAINING A GUN TURRET is shot down and returned to its home base. If a missile silo or a gun turret has been shot and removed from the board, there is no enemy fire from that area so any planes in that area are safe. Notice that the missile silo areas are surrounded by a red border and the gun turret areas are surrounded by a blue border. See Figures 5A and 5B for locations. When WHITE is spun, all planes are safe. Please Note: if your plane is shot down by a missile silo or gun turret in the inner fortress, return it to a RESTART space in your outer fortress.
3. ORDER OF PLAY: after spinning the spinner, the player who rolled the Lower Number moves his or her plane or planes according to the die count just rolled. Then the player who rolled the Higher Number moves his or her plane or planes according to the die count just rolled. You can move one of your planes the full amount on the die or move both of your planes, splitting the die count between them in any combination
4. HOW A FIGHTER PLANE MOVES: a fighter plane can move from one space to any adjacent space by die count as shown in Figure 6. A plane can change direction or land on the same space more than once on the same turn. A plane cannot pass over or land on a space occupied by another plane. A fighter plane can "fly" at High Altitude or Low Altitude by raising or lowering it on its base. Each change in altitude (either High to Low or Low to High) counts as ONE on your die count. Your plane must be at Low Altitude to shoot a target and at High Altitude to cross a wall.

HOW TO WIN THE GAME:
Be the first player to destroy your enemy targets and shoot Zaxxon with both of your fighter planes.

Tribes (1998)

Tribes (1998)

Ratings

6.39598 out of 10 with 82 ratings
Board Game Rank: 6837
Thematic Rank: 701

Description

Tribes is a role-playing game that plays a lot like a board game and simulates the way our ancestors lived long ago. The players are cave men and women. They hunt and gather food, make their tribal laws, and deal with natural disasters, but the object of the game is simple: Look after the children! In this game, the way to win is to have the most kids and do whatever you have to do to make sure they survive to adulthood. The players must know when to cooperate, and when to cut their losses and protect their own families. Players can re-create – and change – the earliest human societies by instituting their own laws and social patterns, and see what effects the rules of society have on their ability to survive and reproduce.

With several copies of the game and a referee, it's possible to have several tribes playing at once, competing, trading, exchanging members, and even making war on each other.

Candidate (1979)

Candidate (1979)

Ratings

6 out of 10 with 15 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

A U.S. presidential election game. Players move from state to state. Each turn a player draws 2 of 3 possible cards: campaigning, fundraising, or dirty tricks. Campaigning gives you votes in your current state. Fundraising give you money which can be spent secretly. Dirty tricks allow you to hurt your opponents, but they sometimes backfire.

Quirks (1980)

Quirks (1980)

Ratings

6.11846 out of 10 with 279 ratings
Board Game Rank: 4725
Strategy Game Rank: 1413

Description

From the back of the box:

Create strange plants and animals - QUIRKS of nature. Struggle to keep your creations alive in a world of rapidly changing climates. Strive to be the first player to make three dominant QUIRKS. Match wits against opponents who threaten your survival. But BEWARE! If three of your QUIRKS become extinct, you've lost the game.

In Quirks, players build unusual plants, herbivores, and carnivores by combining cards that show one of three segments of that plant or creature. Each card is of a particular quirk: a distinctive trait that may give a bonus. Players attempt to create the dominant species of Plant, Herbivore, and Carnivore in the current niche for that turn's climate type -- Ocean, Forest, Plains, Desert and Jungle.

Included are rules for solitaire play, but otherwise Quirks is good for 2-4 players using the standard game. There are also simplified rules for Quirklings, a streamlined version of the game designed for children of ages 7-11, which can handle 2-6 players.

Kippour 1973 (2001)

Kippour 1973 (2001)

Ratings

6.21429 out of 10 with 14 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
War Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

This is an operational game covering the Golan and Sinai battles of the Yom Kippour war in 1973.

It is a moderate-complexity wargame using an Operation Points system where combat and movement are done within a given unit's phase. Players alternate activating formations.

The rules are in French and are complete, although somewhat murky at times. The game may have benefited from a more rigourous editing effort. As usual with VV, beautiful components. All in all, a robust effort from the Vae Victis team.

Industrial Waste (2001)

Industrial Waste (2001)

Ratings

6.752 out of 10 with 1427 ratings
Board Game Rank: 1289
Strategy Game Rank: 664

Description

Industrial Waste is a fast but deep game designed by Jürgen Strohm in which the players are running factories. Players buy materials, complete orders and invest money in technology improvements to earn VPs, but they need to keep an eye on their waste output. If players have too much waste in their factory dump they are liable to suffer an environmental disaster and have to pay hefty cleanup costs. Development of technological improvements requiring less waste, fewer resources, and reduced workforce are the key to this game.

The game features bidding for resources, hand management and some drafting of cards to gain actions. The first player to grow their factory to a value of twenty triggers the end and the player with the most points wins.

Frag Death Match (2001)

Frag Death Match (2001)

Ratings

6.37948 out of 10 with 212 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Thematic Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Coming hot on the heels of the Frag boardgame is Death Match. This first expansion set introduces rules for team play, and the new board features things such as explosive barrels, color-coded doors and water. The Death Match map can be connected with one of the maps in the original Frag to create a large playing surface for team games.

This new expansion set makes your Frag games bigger, wilder, and deadlier - let the Death Match begin!

Contents:
16 new Weapon cards (9 new weapons)
24 new Gadget cards (12 new gadgets)
15 new Specials cards (9 new specials)
1 paper game board (one sided, thin glossy paper)
6 new player characters (foldable cardboard cutouts)
2 flags, 2 base square counters (for CTF)
2 napalm counters
2 mine counters
8 explosive barrel counters
4 page rulesheet covering Capture The Flag and other variants.

Götterdämmerung (2001)

Götterdämmerung (2001)

Ratings

6.34167 out of 10 with 48 ratings
Board Game Rank: 8877
War Game Rank: 1860

Description

relatively simple game covering the final days of the Third Reich, with the final race between Zhukov and Koniev to take the Reichstag. Russian units are Corps, German units are a mish-mash of battallions, brigades, and a few regiments. The map has two scales, an operational-scale covering the Elbe to the jump-off lines on the Oder, and a "grand tactical" map of Berlin itself. The system is a fairly straightforward and standard hex/ZOC/CRT system vaguely reminicient of Masahiro Yamazaki's previous game, Stalingrad Pocket from The Gamers.

Winkeladvokat (1986)

Winkeladvokat (1986)

Ratings

6 out of 10 with 22 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Abstract Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Winkeladvokat is an abstract game for 2 to 4 players.

Re-implemented as:

Cabale




Grave Robbers From Outer Space (2001)

Grave Robbers From Outer Space (2001)

Ratings

5.7772 out of 10 with 906 ratings
Board Game Rank: 5615
Thematic Rank: 751

Description

A fast-paced, humorous look at B-rated science-fiction movies. Players create bad horror and sci-fi films using cards that represent characters, props, locations, creatures and special effects. Creatures are used to attack characters. Props and locations can strengthen characters against creatures. Whoever has the strongest characters in play when the credits roll wins the game.

Part of the B-Movie Series of card games.

Online Play


Ludoholic (no longer available)


Zombies!!! (2001)

Zombies!!! (2001)

Ratings

5.87037 out of 10 with 12549 ratings
Board Game Rank: 3891
Thematic Rank: 736

Description

Players take on the role of a survivor amid city streets sprawling with Zombies. Movement is determined by dice roll as is combat when the player's piece is in the same square as a Zombie. Players must conserve bullets and protect their life counters. At the end of the turn a dice roll directs the player to move a number of Zombies one square (because they are the slow George Romero type).

First player to reach the center of the Helipad tile and kill the Zombie there, or kill a total of 25 Zombies wins. When a player is killed they move back to the starting tile and lose half their Zombie kills.

Zombies!!! is the original game in the Zombies!!! series.

The Extraordinary Adventures of Baron Munchausen (1998)

The Extraordinary Adventures of Baron Munchausen (1998)

Ratings

7.29687 out of 10 with 304 ratings
Board Game Rank: 2276
Thematic Rank: 351
Party Game Rank: 96

Description

This not-quite-a-role-playing-game requires players to sit around telling fantastic (but completely true!) stories. Players may attempt to trip up another player's story by wagering a token ("But the Prussian Army had dissolved by that time, m'lord, so you could not have possibly fought it single-handedly"), whereas the storyteller must counter with another token (and an excuse) or swallow their pride and incorporate it into their story (with another excuse). There are also a few, minor details, mostly used to get boring storytellers to stop. The game is won after each player has told one story. Each player, in turn, gives *all* their tokens to another player they believe has told the best story--so collecting the most tokens doesn't make you the winner, it makes you be able to choose the winner. Of course, the best story-telling wins the game.

Re-published 2002 (starting at Essen) by Krimsus KrimsKrams-Kiste as Die unfasslichen Abenteuer des Freiherrn von Münchhausen.

Is also listed on RPGGeek as The Extraordinary Adventures of Baron Munchausen

Wildcatter (1981)

Wildcatter (1981)

Ratings

5.56 out of 10 with 25 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

"The Authentic Oil & Gas Exploration Game" has an educational aspect to it, as the drilling success ratios, drilling depths, costs and monthly production figures were taken from the real world.

The game is played within the U.S. and Alaska; the players lease properties and drill for oil and gas, trying to get rich. On each lease, you must decide whether to go for shallow or deep wells --once a well has been drilled, even a dry hole, all future drilling must be done at the same depth, even if the lease changes hands. The first few wells are Exploratory and have lesser chances of success; once a producing well has been drilled, further drilling is Developmental. When you land on a player's lease, you buy its monthly oil production from him; landing on your own lease nets you double that amount (paid by the bank). Payments also roll in every time you go around the board.

Random events are injected by Wildcat and Blowout cards. The rest of the game falls in line with what its design is: a Monopoly clone. Big box with lots of fairly nice bits, however.

Zero Zap (1987)

Zero Zap (1987)

Ratings

5.43333 out of 10 with 15 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

The object of this game is to score Sets and Runs of cards and trying to go out first. First to score 50 wins.

Each player is dealt 7 of the 108 cards. On your turn, you either draw 1 or 2 cards, or pick up one or more cards from the playing area (more on this later). Then you play your sets (3 or 4 cards of same color and value) and runs (3 to 7 consecutive cards of the same color) or increase already played sets and runs. Finally, you must discard a card; special cards are truly discarded once their effects are resolved; the other cards are discarded to the playing area, slightly overlapping each other in sequence. When you pick up a card from the playing area, it must be used to play a run or set and you must pick up any cards that follow it (were discarded after it).

Going out scores a 5-point bonus and ends the round. All played sets and runs score (sets are worth 2 per card; runs are worth 1 per card); cards left in hand penalize you 1 point per card.

The number cards (84) come in 3 colors and run from 1 to 7 (there are four of each). Wild cards (6) can replace any number card but cannot be played to form their own sets or runs. Double cards (3) are used to double the value of all of your sets and runs of a given color. The Special cards (14) do various things such as reshuffling the draw and discard decks, stealing a set, run or double, giving a card away, etc. The Zero Zap card (1), if left in your hand when someone goes out, zaps your score for that round to zero (Yikes!). However, if played as a Special to go out, it zaps someone else's (of your choosing) round score!

Zillionaire (1987)

Zillionaire (1987)

Ratings

5.90714 out of 10 with 21 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

This game is a close relative of The Great Dalmuti and Dilbert's Corporate Shuffle. In it, each player is ranked (and seated) according to his wealth (Poor / Thin Ice / Credit Crazy / Upper Crust / Money to Burn / Rich).

The entire deck of 62 cards is dealt out, minus two cards. The first and last player exchange two cards, the next-to-first and next-to-last exchange one. The player to the left of the dealer (the Rich player) begins by playing a set of cards (quantity and face value). The following player can either play the same quantity but higher value or pass. This round continues until all pass; after which another round starts. Players rank (for the next hand) in the order in which they go out.

Score is kept for the agreed upon number of hands (no more than 10). Poor scores 1, Thin Ice 2, etc. High score wins.

Interestingly, the value 5 cards are wild in the sense that a single 5 can represent any number of fives. When played to start a round, the following player determines the quantity. The other cards are Zillionaire (4 in deck), Millionaire (4), Bankroll (3; if played on top of a Bankrupt card, cannot be beaten), Bankrupt (3; can only be beaten by a Bankroll), Bump (3; forces the player to your left to Pass), 8 through 1 (6 of each except for Fives, of which there are only 3).

Freeze Frame! (1977)

Freeze Frame! (1977)

Ratings

5.175 out of 10 with 20 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Abstract Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

The board consists of a 3x3 felt grid on which move eight wooden tokens (four of each of two colours). You are dealt five "frame pattern" cards *after* initial deployment of your pieces. Yellow begins by moving any one of his pieces to the empty space on the grid. Black does the same in turn. Every time the pattern formed by your pieces matches that shown on one of your cards (you're allowed to orient the cards freely), you shout "Freeze Frame!" and score that card. You then replace the card with a newly drawn one. First player to score five cards wins. Play can be prolonged either by going for a larger number of cards or by going through the entire deck of 34 frame patterns.
Each card shows four white dots and ignores the opponent's piece deployment, so you're really playing two different games at once and just getting in each other's way. Neat.

Not Necessarily Rum (1988)

Not Necessarily Rum (1988)

Ratings

6 out of 10 with 3 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Unique card game similar to canasta, rum and hand and foot. Two, three, four, or six players. Two dealers every hand, 2 hands every deal. Game is 25,000 points. Like canasta on steroids.

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