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Monday, August 31, 2015

Password (1962)

Password (1962)

Ratings

6.10388 out of 10 with 801 ratings
Board Game Rank: 3228
Family Game Rank: 890

Description

Based on the classic game show that began in 1961, with many editions printed starting in 1962. Each edition featured a different set of words, although later anniversary editions used words from previous sets.

The object is for one person to get their teammate to say the password given a one-word clue for 10 points. Each time a clue is given, the other player can guess the password; if they get it right, the team scores. If they get it wrong, the other team gets to try for 9 points. This goes back and forth, with the word value continuing to decrease, until A) the word is guessed; B) ten clues are given without a correct guess; or C) the password is said by a clue-giver, in which case the word is thrown out.

Hyphenated words (i.e., "lovey-dovey") are considered two words, and hence are inadmissible.

Libero (1984)

Libero (1984)

Ratings

6 out of 10 with 1 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Abstract Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Abstract Soccer Game played on a grid of squares. Each player has eleven wooden tokens - nine basic ones, one libero (sweeper) and one goalkeeper. Each piece has a small dent on top so the ball can be placed on it.
In a turn, the active player can pass the ball as many times as s/he wishes, in a straight unblocked line (diagonal, too), and move one piece. Regular pieces move any distance diagonally, while the libero can move orthogonally as well (same as the goalie, who is restricted to the box, though). A piece that reaches a field adjacent to an opponent piece with the ball can grab the ball. Goals can be scored if a piece that is not offside can play the ball into the goal in a straight line.

One half time is played until a player has scored three goals. After two half times, the player with most goals is the winner (in case of a tie, an extension is played).

Janus (1975)

Janus (1975)

Ratings

6.28409 out of 10 with 66 ratings
Board Game Rank: 7945
Abstract Game Rank: 439

Description

The aim of the game is to remove as many of the tablets lying on the board as possible by means of clever manipulation of the playing figure (column)and thus to win as much as possible of the square made up of four fields. The tablet that is removed is always that which the column stood on last. The person who removes the last of the four tablets, wins that square and occupies the payment circle with one of his or her coins. The points are added up at the end of the game.

Worlds of Heroes & Tyrants (2001)

Worlds of Heroes & Tyrants (2001)

Ratings

2.66667 out of 10 with 30 ratings
Board Game Rank: 13514

Description

This game is based entirely upon Game Workshop's Talisman. The publisher even refers to it as a "Talisman Variant," but it is a stand alone game.

This poor-man's version of Talisman comes with:

17 x 22 color game map (unmounted)
15 color character stand-ups
5 plastic stands
1 28 page rulebook
1 ten-sided die
85 game cards of various types
1 pad of character sheets

Expanded by:

Worlds of Heroes & Tyrants Card Expansion #1: Frozen in Time
Worlds of Heroes & Tyrants Card Expansion #2: Secrets of The Cataclysm
Worlds of Heroes & Tyrants: Hell
Worlds of Heroes & Tyrants: Hell Card Expansion #1 – Alone
Worlds of Heroes & Tyrants: Hell Card Expansion #2 – Anger Management
Worlds of Heroes & Tyrants: Hell Card Expansion #3 – The Maze
Worlds of Heroes & Tyrants: Vortex




Flowerpower (2001)

Flowerpower (2001)

Ratings

6.61535 out of 10 with 656 ratings
Board Game Rank: 2148
Abstract Game Rank: 100
Family Game Rank: 563

Description

A beautiful tile-laying game where players strive to build large plots of single variety flowers. The larger the plot, the higher the score. Players plant their own gardens but also compete in a central connecting strip. Players also get the chance to plant weeds into the opponent's garden, spoiling their best laid plans.

Flowerpower is part of the Kosmos two-player series.

Beyond Balderdash (1993)

Beyond Balderdash (1993)

Ratings

6.78247 out of 10 with 2407 ratings
Board Game Rank: 1011
Party Game Rank: 62

Description

Beyond Balderdash is the expanded second edition of Balderdash. Balderdash is based on bluffing your opponents into guessing your false definitions to obscure words. Beyond Balderdash adds several new categories to the mix: Movies (make up a plot), Dates (say what happened on it), People (say what the person did), and Initials (make up what they stand for). The real answers are often even more outrageous than the bluffs, so the game offers plenty of laughs.

The UK version of Absolute Balderdash is a different variation with different questions. Notably, the UK Absolute Balderdash features a "Law" category, where you complete the law given on the card. Beyond Balderdash is lacking that category, and features in its place a "Date" category, where you are given a date and must come up with the historical significance. The Canadian and Australian versions of Absolute Balderdash also feature the Date category instead of Law.

Absolute and Beyond were merged into the game Balderdash at least by 2003 (there is a 1997 edition of Beyond Balderdash still with the Dates category). Now, the vanilla version of Balderdash is the five-category edition with Laws instead of Dates. Balderdash with a single category (word definitions) has not existed since at least 2003.

Re-implemented by:

Kokkelimonke Jubileum




Re-implements:

Balderdash




Dragon Quest (1992)

Dragon Quest (1992)

Ratings

6.17371 out of 10 with 194 ratings
Board Game Rank: 6088
Thematic Rank: 714

Description

Fantasy miniature game. A typical Dragons & Dungeon game. Requires a Game Master. The original game comes with 6 Ral Partha metal miniatures, 180 cards (featuring monsters, treasures, objects and traps), a dungeon board, D&D dice, and three pre-made adventures (ISBN 1-56076-552-b)

Calamity! (1983)

Calamity! (1983)

Ratings

5.20943 out of 10 with 53 ratings
Board Game Rank: 12019

Description

Calamity is Games Workshop game published in association with the Sentry Group of Insurance companies. A typical insurance game, where you, as a company, insure risks in this dangerous world. Designed by Andrew Lloyd Webber (yes the famous one). Mechanics from Derek Carver and Ian Livingstone. (OOP 1983)

Mega-Mania (1987)

Mega-Mania (1987)

Ratings

6.66637 out of 10 with 200 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

3-4 player expansion for the 2 player game Block Mania.

Expands:

Block Mania




BattleTech (1985)

BattleTech (1985)

Ratings

6.95982 out of 10 with 2876 ratings
Board Game Rank: 802
War Game Rank: 266
Thematic Rank: 198

Description

BattleTech is a science fiction tactical wargame in which players maneuver giant fighting robots ("BattleMechs," or "'Mechs") against each other (or vehicles and/or infantry). The game system includes details such as varying weapon ranges, heat generation, and discrete hit locations (torso, arms, legs, etc.). 'Mechs vary greatly by mobility and firepower, and players can choose from provided designs or take the time to create their own 'Mechs from scratch. The base game (reprinted in many different editions) includes an introductory rulebook for new players; recent editions also include quick-start rules for an even faster orientation. The game is typically played on one or more mapsheets or (more recently) mounted map boards, and there are many mapsheet and "hex" (mounted-board) packs available for purchase or even download. Optional rules are also available for hexless play a la many miniatures games. An extensive line of pewter figurines ('Mechs, vehicles, and the like) are available in the United States from Iron Wind Metals. (Many earlier BattleTech figures were produced and sold by Ral Partha, which still handles the figure lines in Europe.)

The main component of the current generation of BattleTech is a series of core rulebooks, the central one being Total Warfare (in print and PDF), which contains the main (tournament-legal) rules for the game. (The 2011 Catalyst reprint is up-to-date in terms of errata fixes.) TechManual (in print and PDF) contains construction rules for 'Mechs and other units. A series of three "advanced rules" books adds on to the standard rules: Tactical Operations (in print and PDF) covers on-planet actions over a period of hours; Strategic Operations (in print and PDF) covers in-system actions over a period of weeks; and Interstellar Operations (forthcoming; 2012?) covers system-level actions over a period of months. The final core rulebook available is A Time of War: The BattleTech RPG (in print and PDF), a revised version of the BattleTech RPG rules, which have previously gone under the names MechWarrior and Classic BattleTech RPG. A one-volume tome on the BattleTech universe was announced years ago but has no scheduled release.

BT is also supplemented by a variety of Technical Readouts, which provide gameplay and background data on 'Mechs and other units at various time periods in the game-universe history; map sets, including the new Hex Pack hard-mounted maps with tile overlays; sourcebooks; and pregenerated record sheets, as well as the aforementioned miniatures (which are not required for play).

As in earlier editions of BattleTech, the current generation includes an introductory box set. The current version (released Q1 2011) is the 25th Anniversary Box Set, which features everything necessary to play the game, including:

24 unpainted, ready-to-play plastic BattleMech miniatures.
2 unpainted, premium-quality plastic BattleMech miniatures.
One 12-page full-color quick-start rulebook
One 80-page full-color rulebook
Inner Sphere at a Glance, a 56-page full-color book of universe background and BattleMech technical data
A 36-page book of pregenerated BattleMech Record Sheets
One 16-page full-color Painting and Tactics Guide
Two heavy-duty cards of compiled tables (Many sets came only with one.)
Two 18″ x 24″ double-sided game-board quality maps.

In 2009, the adjective "Classic" was dropped from the BattleTech line.

Introductory Rules

Battletech Introductory Box Set




Core Rulebooks

Classic Battletech: Total Warfare (Standard Game Rules)
Classic Battletech: Tech Manual (Standard Unit Construction)
Classic Battletech: Tactical Operations (Advanced Ground Rules & Construction)
Classic Battletech: Strategic Operations (Advanced Aerospace Rules & Construction, Complete Battleforce Rules)
A Time of War: The BattleTech RPG (RPG rules)
A Time of War Companion (RPG supplement)
Battletech: Alpha Strike (Fast-Play Rules)
BattleTech: Interstellar Operations (forthcoming: 2014?)




Introductory Supplements

Technical Readout: 3039
Record Sheets: 3039 (print version is abridged; PDF is unabridged)
Classic Battletech Starterbook: Sword and Dragon
Battletech Hexpack: Lakes and Rivers
Battletech HexPack: Cities and Roads
Battletech HexPack: Mountains and Canyons




Other Supplements (partial list)

Classic Battletech: Dawn of the Jihad
Battletech: Chaos Campaign
Classic Battletech Starterbook: Wolf and Blake
Classic Battletech Map Compilation 1
Classic Battletech Map Compilation 2
Classic Battletech: Mercenaries Supplemental




Rules Expansions for Previous Editions (partial list)

BattleTech: CityTech
BattleTech: AeroTech
BattleTech: AeroTech 2
Classic Battletech RPG




Amro-Dam (1977)

Amro-Dam (1977)

Ratings

5.625 out of 10 with 8 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Abstract Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Three player version of Dames / Chinese Checkers. Company gift from Amro bank (now together with ABN as ABN-AMRO). Dutch rules.

Het 1845 Spel (1965)

Het 1845 Spel (1965)

Ratings

4.0625 out of 10 with 8 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Children's Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

As your life progresses (from 1-100, in a 'snakes/ladders' environment) you will need to have certain insurance to avoid major personal disasters. The one with the most of money after becoming 100 years old, wins.

Interesting mechanic is that you can buy all kinds of insurance that prevent disaster or bring you money. You cannot buy all of the insurances available though and you have to choose which insurance policies you buy at the beginning of the game. During the game calamities happen which cost money unless you have taken out the correct insurance.

This is a promotion game, but it also has an educative purpose as you teaches what insurances are intended for.

Published in celebration of the merger of two companies, namely "De Nederlanden van 1845" and "Nationale Levensverzekering-Bank", into "Nationale Nederlanden". The company later also published Verzekeringsspel, a re-implementation, in remembrance of the 125-year anniversary of the company's.

Re-implemented by:

Verzekeringsspel




Be aware: only Dutch versions exist.

C&O/B&O (1969)

C&O/B&O (1969)

Ratings

5.3775 out of 10 with 60 ratings
Board Game Rank: 11680

Description

Is this any way to run a railroad?

It is if you can pick up more passenger and freight revenues than your opponent! An authentic railroad dispatching game based on the actual C&O/B&O railroad. Players compete against each other as well as the elements (floods, derailments, collisions, mountain slides) to operate the most efficient railroad system.

Contents:
Dispatcher's Manual containing colorful history, photos and memorabilia of C&O/B&0 railroading plus diagrams and examples of play.
97 train counters
instructions for 1.2 or more players
time table
departure cards
situation cards
freight load counters
2 part game board

Lord of the Fries (1998)

Lord of the Fries (1998)

Ratings

5.96642 out of 10 with 1490 ratings
Board Game Rank: 3254
Thematic Rank: 573
Family Game Rank: 939

Description

Game Synopsis: Lord of the Fries is a thematic sequel to Give Me The Brain!. It takes place at the same restaurant, has the same cast of characters, and requires roughly the same equipment. But the game is entirely different.
Players choose orders (sometimes randomly, sometime not) from the figuratively colorful Friedey's menu, and try to fill them with cards from their hands. Some orders are easy, like the Cowabunga. One Cow Meat, one Bun. Some are a little harder, like the Chickabunga Conga: same as a Chickabunga (Bird Meat plus Bun), plus Fries and a Drink. Sound easy? Now try your hand at a Lord of the Fries, a Meat Munch, or the infamous Patriarch (Fish Meat, Cheese, Bun, Fries, Drink, and the oft-maligned Strawberry Pie).

Awards

1998 Origins Award Nominee: Best Traditional Card Game
2003 Listed in GAMES Magazine's GAMES 100

Online Play


GameTable Online (free, multiplayer, real-time)


Versions


1998 cardstock version (out of print)
2003 Special Edition (color) as Lord of the Fries De-lux
2008 Third Edition (color)


Third Edition card count - 12 Drink, 12 Bun, 12 Fries, 12 Veggies, 12 Cow, 10 Bird, 8 Cheese, 8 Sauce, 8 Fish, 4 Pie

Formula-1 (1962)

Formula-1 (1962)

Ratings

6.67011 out of 10 with 480 ratings
Board Game Rank: 2743
Family Game Rank: 800

Description

A simple racing game where speed and movement is decided by the driver and not the dice. Only when exceeding safety speeds on the bends are dice used to decide the penalty incurred.
The players use "dashboards", cardboard cutouts resembling dashboards, complete with a speedometer and tire and brake wear gauges. Maximum acceleration is fixed, tire and brake wear may happen as a result of cornering too quickly—then there are the dreaded spinouts. A few tight spots exist, so blocking is also an effective tactic.
Tactic cards (you get 5 for the entire race) put a few aces up your sleeve. They can give you an extra burst of speed or of cornering ability.
Pit stops will get you fresh brakes and tires but you must reach them by exact count—otherwise you're forced into another lap. Also, pit cards throw a monkeywrench in—usually you'll lose a turn, but now and then you'll get extra fast service, a burst of speed in coming out of the pit, or special brakes good for one extra corner.
The race runs for up to 10 laps; the player furthest past the finish line when all players have had the same number of turns wins.
The game's simplicity makes it accessible to younger players, whilst it remains enjoyable by adults. I just like the dashboards (reminds me of Gametime's Sopwith or Yaquinto's Shooting Stars). ;-)

Jump! (1998)

Jump! (1998)

Ratings

5.22785 out of 10 with 79 ratings
Board Game Rank: 12427

Description

The premise is quite simple: jump out of airplanes and get your guys to land as close to the coast as possible. The closer you are to the coast, the more points you score. If you splash down into the water, however, you will score negative points. The further from the shore you are in the water, the more negative points you will suffer.
The board depicts a section of land, followed by a beach and ocean. There is a lake on one space of the land section, and a one-space island in the ocean. The board also has two 'landing' tracks running parallel to each other. The tokens are placed on these tracks once they have leapt from the planes. Finally, the board also has a scoring track to tabulate the points ultimately scored following a round, as well as a cumulative scoring track which runs the perimeter of the board.

Each player loads his or her tokens (which vary with the number of players) into the two airplanes. There are four rows of seats in the airplanes, and where your tokens are positioned will be important when considering the timing of your jumps. Players then each receive six cards plus one 'jump' card. These cards dictate the actions that will occur during the turn. Most of the cards move one of the planes (red or yellow) forward or backward a certain number of spaces. Other cards allow a player to switch seats in or between the planes, cancel any jump attempts that round or blow a jumper off course a space. Finally, the jump card causes one of the player's token to leap from the plane and land on the space directly below where he was seated.

The mechanics are quite simple. Each player lays a card face down, and then all reveal their cards simultaneously. Beginning with the start player (which rotates each round), each player carries out the action his card depicts. However, if a player reveals a 'jump' card, then opponents who played a 'wind' or 'cancel jump' card must reveal them, taking the appropriate action. The 'wind' card can be disastrous, as that player gets to bump the jumper one space up or down. This may have the effect of landing the jumper in the water. Cards played are discarded, with the exception of the 'jump' card, which is retrieved back into the player's hand.

When a token leaps from a plane (due to the play of a 'jump' card), he is placed on the outside track of the landing track. If another token leaps into the same space, it is placed along the inside track. Any other tokens that land on that same space are shoved back to the next empty space on the landing track. This can result in a scoring reduction if the token is being moved further from the coast, but can also be a positive occurrence if this causes the token to be moved onto the land as opposed to falling into the water.

Play continues until all tokens have jumped from the planes. They are then moved one-by-one to the scoring track, beginning with the token furthest from the shore. There is a positive scoring track for those tokens that were fortunate enough to land on solid ground, and a negative scoring track for those jumpers who splashed into the water. The more tokens that successfully landed on the ground, the more points the players closest to the shore will score. The converse is also true!

Once all tokens have been repositioned onto the scoring tracks, each player tallies his final results and these are marked on the cumulative scoring track. This entire process is then repeated two more times and the player with the most cumulative points following the third round is victorious.

Ghost Chase (2001)

Ghost Chase (2001)

Ratings

6.19674 out of 10 with 383 ratings
Board Game Rank: 3881
Family Game Rank: 979

Description

One player takes the role of Max, the ghost. Max hides himself in the Canterville castle. The other players are the ghost chasers and search for Max in the castle. Max and the ghost chasers begin the game in rooms of their choice. The Max and his chasers move room to room. Max moves invisibly, showing himself only from time to time. The creatures living around the castle determine when Max must show himself. After each game round, one animal is removed from the board. When all animals of one type have been removed, Max must show which room he is in and how he got there. Max has a code of honor and will not enter the same room twice during the chase.

Unlike Max, the chasers may enter each room as often as they like. They try to force Max into a dead end to catch him. All the chasers win if one of the chasers enters the room where Max is. If the last animal is removed from the board with Max having not been found, the player playing the role of Max is the winner!

Supremacy: Resource Deck 2

Supremacy: Resource Deck 2

Ratings

6.54364 out of 10 with 118 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

A new deck of supplies that can be used separately or combined with the original deck to randomize the available resources.

Expands:

Supremacy




Ritter ohne Furcht und Tadel (1998)

Ritter ohne Furcht und Tadel (1998)

Ratings

4.24615 out of 10 with 65 ratings
Board Game Rank: 13464

Description

Depending upon the number of players, each player receives 1 or 2 knights. Each of these knights lists a series of dice pips on the card, some of which are red in color. These red numbers are the knights defensive abilities, and he will block these numbers if rolled by an opponent during a competition. For instance, Upollonius Wolkenburg has a 1, 2 and 3 in red. Thus, he will block one of each of these numbers each time dice are rolled by an opponent in a competition. Some knights have less numbers in red, but they usually have a greater attack strength, meaning they can roll more dice in combat. This mechanism borrows very heavily from many role playing and fantasy games.

In addition to these 'defense' numbers and the attack dice chart, each knight card also has charts for prizes won (1 - 15) and damage points (1 - 10). There are also nice illustrations on each card ... about the only kind thing I can say about the game.

Each player also receives a 'lady' card. Each lady possesses a number of characteristics, including hair color, build, height and personality. When granting her favor to a knight (which is indicated by placing a corresponding token onto a knight card), the idea is to seek out a knight who desires similar characteristics in a lady.

The start player challenges an opposing knight with one of his knights. A challenge cannot be refused. These two enter battle, which involves each player tossing a number of dice equal to their attack strength into the tournament field. In mounted combat, any 1's, 2's or 3's thrown strike a blow, unless these are blocked by the opponent. If any of these dice strike, the knight falls from his horse and the knight suffers hit points equal to the number of blows which were landed. If only one knight is struck and falls from his horse, the opponent wins and earns a prize for himself and for his lady. If both knights fall from their horse, then the match continues on foot. This involves more dice rolling, but 4's, 5's and 6's now strike. This continues until one knight concedes or reaches 10 damage points, at which time he is out of the tournament (and out of the game).

The next player in turn order then challenges a knight. This process is repeated until there is only one healthy knight remaining. The round then ends and victory points are doled out to the knight and lady who won the most prizes. There are also potential bonuses which add to the players' scores.

Dark Age: Feudal Lords (1996)

Dark Age: Feudal Lords (1996)

Ratings

6.18033 out of 10 with 91 ratings
Board Game Rank: 7788
Customizable Rank: 131

Description

Get a band of mercenaries together and go beat up someone else's band of mercenaries.

You must first spend resource points to try and sway mercs to fight for you. You then arm them to the teeth and give them skills. Each character has a life value (how much damage it can take), a control value (used to recruit the person), a skill number (max amount of skills that can be played on the person), a weapon number (quantity of weapons that may be carried) and combat strings.

The combat is quite involved and owes more to miniature gaming than to card games. First you roll for ranged attacks and compare rolls to your DF string. Each roll that meets or exceeds a number of the string hits so it possible to score multiple hits with one combatant. The defender then gets to fire back in the same manner. After DF is resolved you go to Close Combat. Close combat is handled much the same way except you also have a blocking string so it is possible to block hits.

Special mention must be made of the artwork on the cards. It is stunning.

Online Play


CCG Workshop (no longer available)


Ramses (1988)

Ramses (1988)

Ratings

6.526 out of 10 with 25 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Abstract Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Each of the two players is trying to maneuver his four pieces onto specially marked squares or to box his adversary in (if he cannot move any piece, he's lost). On your turn you move first one of your own pieces, then one of your adversary's.

The pieces move orthogonally (as long as they don't go twice through the same square during a move) by as many squares as there are pieces in its starting column and row (using the larger number, counting itself).
The game has Chess-like qualities since there is no randomness at all, and each player has perfect information.

Chief Herman's Holiday Fun Pack (2000)

Chief Herman's Holiday Fun Pack (2000)

Ratings

5.78421 out of 10 with 152 ratings
Board Game Rank: 8921

Description

Chief Herman's Holiday Fun Pack contains more than thirty previously published by James Ernest and Cheapass Games, as well as an essay and game bibliography.


Six Dice-Coin Games: Bogart; Crash; Flip; Dogfight; Pennywise; Road Trip
Six Card Games: Spots; El Paso; Hey, Bartender!; Following Suit; Last Man Standing; Brain Baseball
Three Bluffing Games: Big Dumb Five; The Lost Pueblo of Doctor Green; Candy
Four Board Games (with 3 Boards): Galaxy; The Celebrated Jumping Frog Game; Stumpy the Cave Boy; Tishai
Three Paper (and pencil) Games: Strange Words; WoRDWeRX; Divide and Conquer
Two Group Games: The Con Game; Love and Marriage
Keeping it Simple (a game design article by James Ernest)
Nine Poker Variants: Rosencrantz and Guildenstern; Suck; Girl's Best Friend; Countdown; How Stupid Are You?; Night Baseball of the Living Dead; Frankenstein; Rescue 9-1-1 with Media Crew; River of Blood; The Order of Poker Hands
Ludography (a list of games designed by James Ernest)



Gaming_Industry_Awards1

*2000 [[Origins Award Nominee: Best Abstract Board Game

Bitin' Off Hedz (1996)

Bitin' Off Hedz (1996)

Ratings

4.59156 out of 10 with 454 ratings
Board Game Rank: 13883
Family Game Rank: 1563

Description

"Prehistory.

Hot. Primordial. Dull.

You've been dominating the earth for longer than you can remember.

Then again, with a brain the size of a walnut, you've also been standing there for longer than you can remember.

Nevertheless, you're completely positive that it's been ten million years since anything interesting has happened.

So you decide to cajole your buddies into a suicide race across skull island. The winner is the first to hurl himself into a big volcano in the middle. The losers are everyone who got their hedz bitten off along the way."

A very simple race game: throw your dice and move your dino. The track is rather long though and when parts of the track pass close to another part, players may throw rocks at each other which place you back at the start.

PitchCar Extension (1997)

PitchCar Extension (1997)

Ratings

7.60425 out of 10 with 1450 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Family Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Carabande Action Set and PitchCar Extension are two remarkably similar products, but each is only compatible with its base-game, and they have differing content.


Carabande Action Set

This expansion is only compatible with Carabande (but not PitchCar).

Contains:

One hourglass-shaped chicane straightaway
One y-shaped chicane straightaway
Two 90-degree curves
One jump




Expands:

Carabande (but not PitchCar)





PitchCar L'extension & PitchCar Extension

The differences between these two products are their box and content. L'extension comes in a plain brown box with a sticker, and Extension comes in a glossy red box like the PitchCar base set. Neither of these is compatible with Carabande.

Contains:

Two straight pieces for crossroads
Four "tight" curves (with two sets of railings)
One "bottlenecking" curved rail straightaway
Two small jumps, with bridge and track piece to use as jumping-crossroad. *




* The original brown-box L'extension did not include the jumps but did include a second "bottlenecking" straightaway.

Expands

PitchCar (but not Carabande)




Buy Microbadge


Dixie: Bull Run (1994)

Dixie: Bull Run (1994)

Ratings

6.25627 out of 10 with 335 ratings
Board Game Rank: 3937
War Game Rank: 1035
Customizable Rank: 117

Description

Gather your armies and fight over 3 positions. Cards represent infantry or cavalry regiments or artillery batteries. The uniform colors and styles are the uniforms that the regiments actually wore (according to the designers). You also have cards representing the participating generals , terrain and the ever present special events.

It is a collectible card set but with a flat rarity. There is the original set of 200 cards representing the Battle of Bull Run. The second set at 400 cards was the Battle of Shiloh. The third set at 250 cards was the Battle of Gettysburg.

All artwork and graphics in the Dixie series were created by RPG/Historical artist, Eric Hotz (www.hotzartworks.com).

Fight City (1999)

Fight City (1999)

Ratings

5.47292 out of 10 with 178 ratings
Board Game Rank: 12276

Description

Fight City is a strategy card game in which each player needs his own deck. Each player's deck is composed of 50-60 cards, like Locations, Fighters, Weapons and Events. Players take turns bringing cards into play and using their cards to fight. The object of the game is to run your opponent out of money.


Versions

Original cardstock

Deluxe boxed (both A and B decks)
Deck A: Power
Deck B: Fear





Awards


1999 Origins Award Nominee: Best Traditional Card Game


Pharao (1984)

Pharao (1984)

Ratings

6.45833 out of 10 with 12 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Abstract Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

This is the third in the Pharao-Brettspiele series of games, the other two being Isis and Ramses.
The board is an Ancient Egyptian Senet board, and the game can be played as such if one supplies the throwing sticks (randomizing devices that eventually evolved into dice; available in commercial Senet sets or easily home-made). Note, however, that there are only 4 pieces per player instead of the almost-standard 5 (historically, the number of pieces per player varied between 5 and 10), so a fifth piece would ideally need to be supplied.
H. A. Renz chose, once more, to use the components for an entirely different, modern abstract strategy game. Each player uses two special dice to move both his pieces and his adversary's (this is the only game of the triad to have a random element). The object of the game is to either "push" all adversary pieces into the water (a special square), occupy the "happiness" square with one's last remaining piece, or box the adversary in so he cannot move.
Note how driving towards one victory condition (by adversary elimination) actually opens up a victory opportunity for the adversary --a neat twist.
Remarkably, the starting position is asymmetric because the board is asymmetric. There does not seem to be much of an advantage or handicap to being one side or the other.

Get Out (1998)

Get Out (1998)

Ratings

5.52489 out of 10 with 235 ratings
Board Game Rank: 11343
Thematic Rank: 823
Family Game Rank: 1432

Description

Get Out is a Monopoly-style game with three tracks instead of one, and a couple of nice mechanical twists. The squares on the outer board are jobs, and the squares on the middle board are apartments. You can take as many jobs as you want, but each one slows you down, making it harder to get to Payday. Money doesn't really matter anyway; the real point of the game is to spend four months in the terrifying center ring. Not that they necessarily have to be four months in a row....

Supremacy: Warlords and Pirates of the Neutral Zones (1987)

Supremacy: Warlords and Pirates of the Neutral Zones (1987)

Ratings

6.26622 out of 10 with 148 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
War Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Gives the countries unoccupied by the starting players a fighting chance. Also creates a source of income for the superpowers by giving them a market to sell their weapons.

Expands:

Supremacy




Expanded by:

Supremacy: Boomers – Warlords and Pirates Blister Pack
Supremacy: Tanks – Warlords and Pirates Blister Pack




Monad (1969)

Monad (1969)

Ratings

6.30789 out of 10 with 375 ratings
Board Game Rank: 3544
Abstract Game Rank: 203

Description

The object of the game is to collect round cards known as "Monads," which look like yin-yang symbols. The players do this by Trading, Buying, and Leaping with other cards.

Monad / Die 1. Million uses a deck of cards with six colors (Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, and Purple). Half of these are called "Warm" colors (Red, Orange, and Yellow), and the others are "Cool" colors (Green, Blue, and Purple). The majority of cards has one symbol on them (known as "Commons"), but there is one card of each color with 2-5 colors on them (known as "Bis," "Tris," "Quads," and "Quints"). At the start of the game, each player is assigned one of the six colors as their "identity" and is dealt six Commons and one "Bonus" card (which shows three pairs of colors). The Bis, Tris, Quads, and Quints are placed face up in separate piles in the center of the table.

On their turn, a player attempts to get higher numbered cards into their hand. The easiest way is by "Trading." To trade, a player turns in a pair of cards with the same number of symbols but of opposite colors (one warm and one cool) and takes the top card from the stack with the next highest number of symbols. When they turn in two Quints, they gain a Monad. If the two cards turned in match one of the pairs on their bonus card, they may also draw the top card from each of the lower stacks. They may also use cards of the same color as their Identity as wild cards, which are treated as having any number of symbols.

The player can turn in more than two cards and "Leap" to a higher stack. This allows them to select a card with a higher number of symbols. Finally, they can "Buy" a card. Buying cards uses the numbers located on each card. The player turns in a number of cards which total greater than the number on the card they are after. Monads can be purchased for 80 points.

A player can also draw the top card from the deck but doing so prevents them from taking any other action that turn.

The first player to accumulate a given number of Monads (which varies depending on the number of players in the game) is the winner.

Belongs to the 3M Gamette Series

Kult (1995)

Kult (1995)

Ratings

6.70433 out of 10 with 187 ratings
Board Game Rank: 4131
Customizable Rank: 122

Description

Reality as you know it is a lie. The world we see around us is an illusion hiding True Reality, a horrible illusion fabricated to keep humanity at bay, and to prevent our awakening.

That is the premise to the darkest of the CCGs. You play an Archon or an Angel of Death. You lay beings or regions around you and to the side in a Tarot type layout. On these cards you can play influence cards. Your spell casters can play spells and there are commandments that you can play that have instant effects. On your turn you try to influence the population at large by moving population counters onto your outer cards then to your inner cards then onto the card representing you. With 2 players there are 9 population markers and the first to sway 5 wins. Of course along the way your beings will be throwing everything but the kitchen sink at each other.

Between the subject matter and the dark and very graphic cards this is not a kids game.

Online Play


CCG Workshop (no longer available)


Executive Decision (1971)

Executive Decision (1971)

Ratings

6.04139 out of 10 with 366 ratings
Board Game Rank: 4602

Description

First, you decide on what finished goods you want to sell and how much, based on your capital. Based on that, you buy the raw materials necessary to do that. You combine raw materials to make finished goods. You sell the finished goods.

You have to bid on the purchase price of the raw materials and the sales price of the finished goods. When supply exceeds demand the prices drop. When demand exceeds supply the prices rise. If you bid less than the going price, you get nothing.

Easy to learn, but interesting strategies. Somewhat mechanical, but a good game by Sid Sackson.

Part of the 3M Bookshelf Series.

Ani-Mayhem (1996)

Ani-Mayhem (1996)

Ratings

5.08229 out of 10 with 96 ratings
Board Game Rank: 13007
Customizable Rank: 239

Description

In this CCG you lay sites to build the game board. You then place items and disasters at the sites. You chose 4 starting characters and create a deck with other characters, actions, equipment etc. You also have a separate deck of combat cards that you can use to enchant your fight or charm ability. You move your characters in groups around the board trying to get items. As you do you will set off disasters that have to be dealt with. Sometimes they guard a site but a lot of them start roaming the board looking for fights. You win by acquiring over half the items or by having the most when all items have been acquired.

The first set (0) consists of 303 cards and has art from the films Bubblegum Crisis, El Hazard, Ramma 1/2, and Tenchi Muyo.

The second set (1) consists of 220 cards and has art from Armitage III, Dominion Tank Police, Phantom Quest Corp., Project A-Ko, and Oh My Goddess.

In the third set (Dragon Ball Z) consists of 232 cards and all art is exclusively from Dragon Ball Z the series.

There are also a fairly large number (32) of promotional cards.

USAC Auto Racing (1979)

USAC Auto Racing (1979)

Ratings

5.80684 out of 10 with 177 ratings
Board Game Rank: 10489
Thematic Rank: 805
Strategy Game Rank: 1618

Description

Billed as the Official Game of the United States Auto Club this is one of Avalon Hill's early Sports Illustrated branded games. The game was created by Jim Barnes who sold the game at a booth that he set up at Indy and other race track promenades in the 1970s. Mr. Barnes struck a deal with Avalon Hill and the game was changed a little by the development team at AH and published with the SI logo on the box. On an oval track you can run up to 33 cars. Each car has its own driver card derived from the performance of the actual drivers of the featured Indy race. Ongais, Foyt, Unser, Sneva, Mears, Rutherford etc, every driver that was in the that year's Indy has a card with a color photo on one side and game racing charts on the other side. One Card set, for an even year Indy race from 1978 through 1986, was included in the box with the other card sets offered through the AH mail order program.

Each driver card has 6 tables on the back. Three of the tables for movement, you chose whether you are going to drive normally, charge or back off and then roll 2 dice, referencing the appropriate table. The result will tell you how far you can move or if you have encountered car trouble. There are 2 trouble tables that can slow you down or knock you out of the race. There is also a pit stop table which controls how many turns you must sit in the pits before re-entering the race.

The game is driven on Stats and can be played solitaire.

Upwords (1981)

Upwords (1981)

Ratings

5.67705 out of 10 with 2253 ratings
Board Game Rank: 5727
Family Game Rank: 1278

Description

Players take turns forming words on either an 8x8 matrix gameboard (in the current new classic version offered by Winning Moves) or on a 10x10 matrix gameboard (in the currently offered Hasbro Euro edition). Words may be formed horizontally or vertically on the grid, as in Scrabble, but as the title suggests the letters may also be stacked, so already-played words can be changed into different words by having letters stacked (up to a limit of 5 high). EXAMPLE: Change LATE to CATER and then change CATER to BELATED. Scoring is different from Scrabble; there are no prescribed letter values per tile; instead, when a new word is formed, the number of tiles used in that word is counted and used as the score as follows: A word that is flat (no stacked tiles) scores 2 points per tile, but the words that score the most are those that have many stacked tiles, with tiles underneath the spelled word also being counted. The impact of these rules provide for scoring-per-turn increasing as the game continues.

Winning Moves classic 8x8 version:
http://www.amazon.com/Winning-Moves-1194-Classic-Upwords/dp/...;keywords=upwords&qid=1464366613&ref_=sr_1_1&sr=8-1

Hasbro Euro 10x10 version:
http://www.amazon.com/Upwords-The-3D-Word-Building-Game/dp/B...;keywords=upwords&qid=1464366613&ref_=sr_ph_1&sr=sr-1

August 2016 will have a new Hasbro version 10x10 game available in the United States.

An app for UPWORDS play is available both for iphone and android devices, by Lonely Star Software, under license from Hasbro. Players can play alone, against an AI component of varying skill level, or against another player anywhere in the world.

Hasbro is the worldwide licensee of UPWORDS rights from Rudell Design LLC.

Upwords Deluxe has an 11 x 11 rotating grid, 121 tiles and 28 challenge tiles, and electronic timer.

Yali (1996)

Yali (1996)

Ratings

5.2912 out of 10 with 147 ratings
Board Game Rank: 12716
Abstract Game Rank: 777

Description

This game is all about balance. The board itself is hinged and moves as players move their metal balls across the boards' surface.

Which ever way the board is tilting towards decides whose turn it is.

It is possible that a player might get two turns in a row if the board still tilts towards them after they move a ball.

The first player to get all 8 of their balls to the other side of the tilt-table wins.

The Republic of Rome (1990)

The Republic of Rome (1990)

Ratings

7.54868 out of 10 with 3399 ratings
Board Game Rank: 296
Strategy Game Rank: 192

Description

The Republic of Rome is an abstraction of over 250 years of history. It simulates the politics of the Roman Senate during the republic. The players take the part of various factions vying for the control of the senate. They control the various powerful families of the time, who compete for state offices, military command, economic concessions and new adherents. To win the player must get their faction to become the most powerful in Rome. While doing this, however, a balance must be maintained. A hostile world situation, and the vagaries of the public of Rome means that the players must also cooperate so that Rome herself doesn't go down under this pressure. If Rome does not last, neither does the senate, and all players lose!

Players make proposals to the Senate which other players then vote on. A player's ability to make proposals is determined by which Offices his/her Senators hold. A player's influence in votes is determined by the number of Senators they have recruited and the level of influence those Senators have obtained. Proposals may include assigning Senators to governor provinces (generating revenue), recruiting an army to fight an external foe, addressing the concerns of the Roman people, assigning offices or prosecuting previous office holders. Players have to co-operate to overcome the various threats that the game sends against Rome (wars, famine, unrest, bankruptcy) whilst working to build their own Senators' and Generals' positions and undermine that of their opponents. A powerful General or an influential Senator may become Emperor (thus winning the game) but equally may suddenly fall to the plague or an assassin's blade.

Hexagony (1977)

Hexagony (1977)

Ratings

5.79667 out of 10 with 132 ratings
Board Game Rank: 9958
War Game Rank: 2296
Abstract Game Rank: 599

Description

This game was originally published by the designer as Bin'Fa under the company name Taoist Arts, Inc. It was released a few years later as Hexagony by Avalon Hill, and then again as Bin'Fa by the designer under the company name Kenterprises. The Avalon Hill version has slightly different rules. Alan Moon is credited with development of this version. Bin'Fa will be re-released February 2015 after undergoing numerous alterations and rule changes from its previous incarnations.

Bin'Fa/2015 Edition is described by the Publisher/Designer:

Bin’Fa is a game of strategy for 2 to 6 players, each of whom controls an army of twelve units, a general and a supply pawn. In multiple army games, each player controls either two or three armies. The object of the game is to capture the opposing army units by surrounding them, thereby removing them from play.

The game board is divided into six separate triangles, which offer almost limitless possibilities for new terrain each game. Each player places his armies at the start of the game in his home battle sector. The board also contains terrain markers and vortex markers, which the armies can use to jump around and appear unexpectedly behind enemy lines, presenting a sudden and unforeseen threat to the rear.

The terrain transforms what would otherwise be a featureless playing area into one that more closely resembles the terrain over which actual battles are fought. With an almost incalculably large number of possible different terrain configurations, strategy cannot be decided in advance. The beginner always stands a chance against the experienced player.

Bin´Fa armies use up supplies when they move just as real armies do. On taking possession of the dice, players must choose between moving their army units on the battle sector (which uses up supplies) or using their turn to move the supply marker in hope of obtaining fresh supplies.

One of the most exciting aspects of Bin´Fa is the "cavalry charge." As long as a player has sufficient supplies and is lucky enough to avoid rolling a double, it is possible to send a force dashing across the board to attack enemy units and (hopefully) return.

The game of Bin´Fa brings together two strands whose origins go back to very ancient times. Sun Tzu was a famous Chinese general and student of warfare. Bin´Fa is based on the precepts contained in his classic work on the subject, "The Art of War," written 2,300 years ago. They provide the structural framework for the game.

Outdoor Survival (1972)

Outdoor Survival (1972)

Ratings

4.6106 out of 10 with 849 ratings
Board Game Rank: 13913
Thematic Rank: 884
Strategy Game Rank: 1651

Description

Lost and alone, you must survive and escape the woods. There are 5 different scenarios from inexperienced hikers lost in the woods to a rescue party trying to find a lost person. You will have to deal with animals, finding food and water, mother nature and sickness without dying to win.

Class Struggle (1978)

Class Struggle (1978)

Ratings

4.85926 out of 10 with 166 ratings
Board Game Rank: 13706
Thematic Rank: 878

Description

This Avalon Hill game is a vehicle for instructing students (there is a classroom section in the rules) on why Marxism is superior. The Workers move around a board while trying to survive against the Capitalist player who control everything. As the Workers unite they take power from the Capitalist player but if they do not suceed in uniting the Capitalist will win.

The Marxist politics are very up front in this game in presentation and in the suggested reading in the rules. A surprising publication from a war game company

Dogfight (1962)

Dogfight (1962)

Ratings

6.27257 out of 10 with 370 ratings
Board Game Rank: 3869
War Game Rank: 1100

Description

Dogfight is one of the American Heritage games in the "Command decision" series of wargames published by Milton Bradley circa 1961-65. Definitely not for the hardcore wargamer, Dogfight is a light version of WWI air combat. The Germans and Americans each get 6 biplanes divided into 2 squadrons of 3 planes each. Each squadron gets a hand of combat maneuver cards and players move one plane from each squadron engaging and evading each other. For each plane shot down you receive an ace token that entitles you to hold a larger hand of cards. Anti-Aircraft guns guard each home squadron and the lucky flyer has the opportunity to strafe the enemies planes on the ground. A great introductory wargame with easy to learn rules.

Broadside (1962)

Broadside (1962)

Ratings

6.06716 out of 10 with 341 ratings
Board Game Rank: 4756
War Game Rank: 1385

Description

Broadside is an American Heritage game from the "Command Decision" series published by Milton Bradley circa 1962. Players take turns maneuvering their frigates and other ships to gain position so as to fire their cannons and destroy the masts on the enemy ships. Not for hardcore gamers, Broadside is an introductory wargame of early naval combat on the high seas. Some ports are guarded by land based cannons and players risk losing ships by straying too close. Rules are easy to learn and like "Dogfight" the game includes some great plastic miniatures to play with.

Isis (1992)

Isis (1992)

Ratings

5.75 out of 10 with 12 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked
Abstract Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

A beautiful solid-wood game that uses a reproduction of an Ancient Egyptian game's components (board and pieces; unfortunately, this game's original ancient rules are lost) and adapts them with thoroughly modern rules.
Players maneuver neutral pieces into a position where they can be personalized, and then try to maneuver the personalized piece onto one of two throne spaces to claim victory.
How much a piece moves depends on how many pieces there are in its section of the board.
A perfect information, non-random game, it becomes very tense with several players as the consequences of your move take several turns to become clear.

Conquistador (1976)

Conquistador (1976)

Ratings

6.41927 out of 10 with 531 ratings
Board Game Rank: 2885
War Game Rank: 702
Strategy Game Rank: 1189

Description

"Conquistador recreates the 16th Century exploration and conquest of the New World (North and South America) by the major powers of Europe." (from Avalon Hill game box)

"The game is quasi-historical in nature, providing the atmosphere and mechanics of the 16th Century world, along with historical personages. The object of the game is for one Country to accumulate as much wealth, land, and prestige (in the form of actual discoveries) as he[sic] can; the Country with the greatest total of all three is the victor." (from SPI game rules introduction)

Originally published in 1976 by SPI in Strategy & Tactics magazine #58, and later sold as a boxed edition in a plastic tray, the SPI version is a one to three player game, featuring the Spanish (green counters), French (blue counters), and English (beige counters). Rules for Portugal or the German bankers as a fourth player are included, but no counters are provided in the game.

The Avalon Hill edition is a one to four player game, featuring the Spanish (green counters), French (blue counters), English (pink counters) and Portuguese (yellow counters). This edition of the game was published in 1982 with a mounted map in a bookcase box. The "Fur Traders & Buccaneers" variant in The GENERAL Vol.21 No.5 added counters and rules for Dutch, Danish, and slave units.

Developer: Greg Costikyan

Bakschisch (1995)

Bakschisch (1995)

Ratings

5.71389 out of 10 with 108 ratings
Board Game Rank: 9743

Description

One of the original games released by Goldsieber upon their business launch. Players attempt to sneak and bribe their way into a Sultan's palace.

Designer Kara Ben Hering is actually a pseudonym for Klaus Teuber, Fritz Gruber, Wolfgang Ludtke, and Peter Neugebauer.

Mid-East Peace (1990)

Mid-East Peace (1990)

Ratings

5.04673 out of 10 with 107 ratings
Board Game Rank: 13118
War Game Rank: 2497

Description

Mid-East Peace is one of those great games where luck really doesn't play a part, once initial country selection is made. The game is set during the pressure cooker situation of the early 90's and the tension of the game certainly reflects this. Players out-maneuver and out-bluff one another so as to gain the riches of the region, while making sure they spend enough of the "oil/money" to ensure the safety of their state. The tension is kept up by secret deployment of forces and the continual angst of balancing resource spending with the saving necessary to come off the winner. It is, usually, the richest player, the one who has probably spent least on 'defense' throughout the game that will come off the victor. But, the twist is that the game can end in war or peace, and there are different victory conditions depending on which of the two outcomes it ends in. A very hard balance to maintain.

Hotel Tycoon (1974)

Hotel Tycoon (1974)

Ratings

5.40567 out of 10 with 2224 ratings
Board Game Rank: 13688
Family Game Rank: 1523

Description

Hotel Tycoon, first published as Hotels, is a Monopoly-like game in which hotel tycoons try to buy and build the best hotels in the world and compete for guests. The game caters two to four players, ages eight and up. An average game lasts about 90 minutes.

Players try to buy and build the best hotels in this game, earning the most money or bankrupting their opponents. A successful hotel consists of three components: the land on which it's built, the hotel buildings, and the entrances by which guests arrive in the hotels. All three components need to be bought separately with in-game money. As in Monopoly, money is earned by players who end up on one of the entrances of your hotels, after their dice roll. The more luxurious the hotel, the more money a guest will earn you. Money you can use to build extensions to your existing hotels, buying new entrances or pay other players when you arrive at their hotels.

The game consists out of cardboard, three-dimensional hotel buildings, recreational grounds and entrance stairs that can be placed on the large game board.

Masterpiece (1970)

Masterpiece (1970)

Ratings

5.56445 out of 10 with 1329 ratings
Board Game Rank: 11303
Family Game Rank: 1438

Description

Van Gogh, Rembrandt, Renoir --- paintings by the world's most famous artists are on the auction block, for sale to the highest bidder. How high will you bid before the tension and bluffing get to you? And how good's your eye --- can you spot a forgery when you buy one?

The MASTERPIECE game combines the excitement of a fast-paced board game with the glamour and sophistication of a game that deals with fine art. Some of the world's greatest paintings, illustrated in full-color postcards, are an integral part of gameplay.

The high-stakes world of international art --- and the power plays of an auction --- will entertain and enlighten as you join a particularly eccentric group of collectors who've all come in search of a MASTERPIECE.

Each player takes the role of an art collector and tries to amass the greatest fortune in cash and the value of art pieces in their collection.

The painting cards are randomized and placed face down in a stack. Matching size value cards are also mixed and placed face down in a stack. These value cards indicate the worth of the painting ranging from forgery (zero) to $1,000,000. Each player receives an equal sum of money and one painting with value card which are clipped together so that all players can see the painting and only the owning player can see the value. When paintings are drawn from the stack, a value card is clipped to them in this fashion. Players move around the board by die roll and land on spaces that allow the player to collect money from the bank, receive a painting from the stack, sell a painting to the bank for its value, sell a painting to the bank for a specified amount, auction one of their paintings to the highest bidding opponent, or auction the top painting in the stack to the highest bidder.

The game ends when the painting stack is exhausted. Players add the values of their paintings to their cash on hand. The player with the largest total wins.

Zocken (1998)

Zocken (1998)

Ratings

5.55781 out of 10 with 41 ratings
Board Game Rank: 11134

Description

With seven colored dice you roll them one by one and place them on the small board. You must play them low to high but they do not have to be in order. Example 1-1-3-4-4-5-5 would be a legal placement. If a die can not be legally placed you must place it in an area that scores you negative points. Each space is also color coded and you get bonus points for placing a die on the matching color. Other players can also bet on your ability to achieve your goal.

A simple and quick game.

World in Flames (1985)

World in Flames (1985)

Ratings

7.49588 out of 10 with 1171 ratings
Board Game Rank: 843
War Game Rank: 99

Description

(from ADG website :)

World in Flames is Australian Design group's international award winning game that is the strategic game of World War II. Five full-colour maps portray all the theatres of war: Europe, Russia, Africa, the Middle East, India, Asia, the Pacific, the Atlantic and (most importantly) Australia.

[...]Counters represent the armies and corps, the aircraft carriers, the naval task forces and the air groups that took part. Everything you need to re-fight the greatest conflict in history.

Two to six players make the strategic decisions that decide the fate of nations. What forces to produce, where to commit them, when and how? No two games of World in Flames play the same, no strategy is foolproof, any decision may have unforseen, long-term consequences.

World in Flames contains all the latest top quality components, 1400 counters, 5 maps, 2 combat charts, one Production Circle and the comprehensive rules and scenarios booklets, that have been extensively updated and revised based on 2 million playing hours of the world's greatest game.

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