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Friday, July 24, 2015

ZÈRTZ (1999)

ZÈRTZ (1999)

Ratings

7.31129 out of 10 with 3305 ratings
Board Game Rank: 437
Abstract Game Rank: 10

Description

In ZÈRTZ, the third addition to the GIPF Project, players compete to acquire sets of multi-colored balls. This is mostly accomplished by jumping one ball over one or more others, Checkers-style, on a hex board. A player's turn consists of either jumping (which can be forced) or placing any color ball on the board and removing an empty space from the edge of the board. In this manner, the play space continually shrinks, giving the endgame an almost claustrophobic feel.

This game is part of project GIPF.

GIPF (1997)

GIPF (1997)

Ratings

7.12195 out of 10 with 2368 ratings
Board Game Rank: 666
Abstract Game Rank: 19

Description

GIPF is a strategic game for two players based on a classic concept: In turns, players introduce one piece into play until achieving four-in a-row. Players then remove their row and capture any of their opponent's pieces which extend that row. This principle of capturing pieces creates each time again completely changed situations on the board. The purpose is to form successive rows of at least four pieces, until the opponent has no piece left to bring into play.

GIPF is not only the name of a game, but of a project as well. This project concerns a group of games and extra pieces that will follow step by step. Each game of the project will be playable either separately, or, by means of extra pieces, in combination with GIPF. It concerns a system that makes winning or losing GIPF-related games a strategic factor of the game GIPF itself.

This game is part of project GIPF.

Abalone (1987)

Abalone (1987)

Ratings

6.43564 out of 10 with 4680 ratings
Board Game Rank: 1326
Abstract Game Rank: 139

Description

This beautiful and functional board has room for two teams of large marbles. Players take turns pushing the marbles around the board, with the goal of pushing six of the opposing player's marbles off the board. The central idea is that a column of marbles has weight given by the number of marbles in line. Someone will need to push with a heavier group of marbles in order to push the column along that axis. However, with six possible directions, it's difficult to defend yourself perfectly. Also, it's possible to play the game with up to six players when supplemental marble sets are purchased.

Pisa (1999)

Pisa (1999)

Ratings

6.30721 out of 10 with 104 ratings
Board Game Rank: 6309

Description

from Schloesser session report:

This is a trick-taking game, but with enough twists to give it a very different feel. Before each hand, players bid, one at a time, to determine three factors which will affect the hand:

a) trump colors (primary & secondary)
b) most or fewest tricks
c) whether zero is considered 'high' or 'low'

Bidding is done by playing cards face-down from your hand. Players must bid 1 - 3 three cards on each of these categories. Once all three factors have been determined, players tally the value of the cards they played during this bidding process. The player who played the least value receives 4 (or 5, depending upon the number of players) victory points, with each other player receiving less points depending upon their total. Then, players must discard three of the cards they used in the bidding process, with the remaining cards being returned to their hands. This is usually a tough choice as often the conditions in effect for a particular hand turn out to be different than what you had hoped. This means that many of the cards you played may no longer be useful to you; indeed, they may be a detriment. So, deciding on which cards to keep and which to discard can be tough.

After this procedure is complete, A standard trick-taking game ensues. Points, however, are rewarded based on whether the goal was to take the most or fewest tricks. The player finishing with the most (or fewest, depending upon which goal was in force) receives 8 points (or 10 of playing with 5 players), the next player gets 6 points and so on down to 2 points. After a hand is completed, the entire process is repeated, including the bidding phase. A number of rounds equal to the number of players is played, with the player accumulating the greatest number of victory points being the victor.

Desperados (1990)

Desperados (1990)

Ratings

5.52826 out of 10 with 311 ratings
Board Game Rank: 11465
Family Game Rank: 1412

Description

In Reiner Knizia's first published game, there are nine mine-opening cards and nine mine-closing cards. To score any points you've got to play gold, silver or copper cards onto the corresponding open mine and then close it. Trouble is, your opponents can close your mine before you want or even try to steal it with bandit cards -- a tough gauntlet to run, but here and there a few points trickle through and into the scoring column. On your turn you either play a card OR draw a card -- not both -- making this rapid-fire card game move at its own special pace, which is very quickly indeed. Designed primarily for partnership play, and appreciated best by players with good partnership skills, variations are described for 2 or 3 players. The Hexagames edition debuted in 1990; the recent Avalanche Press version has new pictures on the cards and a trivial rules tweak.

Released as Desperados in 2009 by Eagle-Gryphon Games.

Crokinole (1876)

Crokinole (1876)

Ratings

7.80414 out of 10 with 7875 ratings
Board Game Rank: 64
Family Game Rank: 4

Description

This game is like shuffleboard in the round. Players take turns flicking disks on a board, trying to score points by attaining central regions. The main stipulation being that contact with the other teams' pieces must be made in order for the disk to remain on the board afterward. Although the game uses quite a bit of skill to flick the disks, there's a very significant strategy element to the game. There are many different variants and rules, as this game is very old and has had many different incarnations over the years.

Axis & Allies: Europe (1999)

Axis & Allies: Europe (1999)

Ratings

6.50705 out of 10 with 2259 ratings
Board Game Rank: 1610
War Game Rank: 570

Description

One of the first releases from Avalon Hill games under Hasbro. A&A: Europe uses the same system as the original Axis & Allies, although now the focus of the game in on the European theater of WWII. Two new units have been added to the game (destroyers and artillery) and there are some modifications to the rules and overall strategic scenario.

Mush (1994)

Mush (1994)

Ratings

5.83739 out of 10 with 111 ratings
Board Game Rank: 9111

Description

This dice-heavy racing game is set in the great white north of Alaska, where the most efficient way of crossing those vast expanses is behind a team of sled dogs. Players must carefully manager their dogs in an effort to conserve their strength for the entire race. However, the dogs' strengths may be different depending on what type of dog the player selected at the beginning of the game: good weather dogs, bad weather dogs, or all-around dogs; each has its advantages and disadvantages. After picking the course to take over the modular board, the first player to avoid the avalanches and reach the destination city is the winner. This game is Out of Print and was part of the White Wind 1200 series.

6-Tage Rennen (1986)

6-Tage Rennen (1986)

Ratings

6.89638 out of 10 with 237 ratings
Board Game Rank: 3252
Family Game Rank: 842

Description

A bicycle race game. On their turn, a player can play any card in their hand and move their rider forward the corresponding number of spaces. If they land on a unoccupied space, their move ends there. If they land on a space occupied by one other rider, they double their move. If they lands on a space occupied by two other riders, they triple their move. And so on.

Example: A player plays a 3 card and lands on a space occupied by three other riders. He moves nine more spaces for a total move of twelve spaces.

The object of the game is to cross the finish line first.

Not to be confused with Internationales 6 Tage Rennen.

True Colors (1989)

True Colors (1989)

Ratings

5.99589 out of 10 with 389 ratings
Board Game Rank: 4799
Party Game Rank: 273

Description

Players attempt to best anticipate how others perceive them. Each round consists of several private ballot votes on who best fits a particular question. Once votes are entered players guess at the number of votes they received for that particular question. The better your estimate the more points you make and the winner being the player who best understands how others see the player.

WarChest (1999)

WarChest (1999)

Ratings

5.77 out of 10 with 10 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

WarChest is a customizable miniatures game. In WarChest, players command warriors, sorcerers, monsters and other fantastic forces in battle on the world of Gaos. The object of the game is to capture the opponent's war chest. Beginning on opposite sides of the board, players maneuver figures and use special abilities to gain a tactical advantage, attack enemy figures, and capture the opponent's war chest. With each play, the opponent's choice of figures will provide a fresh new challenge. As players acquire more WarChest figures, armies will grow, offering a wider range of tactical options.

Holiday! (1973)

Holiday! (1973)

Ratings

6.59194 out of 10 with 36 ratings
Board Game Rank: 8539

Description

In this game, players attempt to guide an airplane around the world as the calendar progresses from day to day. Players hold a hand of cards, each stating a city and day-of-the-week combination. Their goal is to have the plane reach their destination as close to their card's day as possible. (E.g. if I hold "Paris - Tuesday" then I'd like the plane to reach Paris on Tuesday, not on Saturday--it's worth more points that way).

The method by which the plane moves is based on an auction. Each round, players bid for the right to choose the plane's next destination (each player starts with a fixed amount of money and cannot earn any money during the game). Movement is restricted to only adjacent cities. Sometimes a player will receive a windfall when an opponent pays for the privilege of moving the plane but moves it to a place where it beneficial to both players. At other times, a player will see the plane start moving away from the area of the world preferred.

Play continues until all players are out of money or one player has played all of his or her cards. Most victory points earned (as the cards are played) determines the victor.

Re-implemented as:

Shanghai
Maloney's Inheritance




Silverton (1991)

Silverton (1991)

Ratings

7.09001 out of 10 with 940 ratings
Board Game Rank: 1257
Strategy Game Rank: 628

Description

Game description by the publisher (2nd Ed.)
Set in the historic mining areas of Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah, Silverton is a game of railroading, mining, and commodity market manipulation.

Use your surveyor to plot your railroads and your prospector to find your mines. Operate your empire of mines and railroads to position your gold, silver, and other commodities in the right market and at the right time to reap maximum profit.

Contains a 17x22 mounted mapboard, Each player will have 32 wooden cubes and 8 wooden disks in one of the following colors. White, Green, Red, Yellow, Blue, Purple, 13 black 5/16" cubes for the price chart, 208 chips - in various colors, two decks, rules book, box and turn marker.

User review: Players make money by building a network of railroads to deliver freight and passengers. They may also speculate on the price of precious metals by claiming mines and mills.

To play: Each player chooses a color and takes possession of all the surveyors and prospectors of that color. How much money they begin with, in which city the players start, the number of surveyors and prospectors they begin with depends on the turn order and the number of players in the game.

A game turn is divided into seven phases:
First phase - The turn order cards are shuffled and dealt to the players.
Second phase - Players may place prospectors and surveyors on the game board in turn order.
Third phase - Disputes are resolved between players who placed surveyors in the same box on the game board.
Fourth phase - Players pay for construction and claims made by their prospectors in turn order. Players can collect revenue for passenger cards and deliver and sell freight for up to two claims.
Fifth phase - The dice are rolled to determine price changes for each mine.
Sixth phase - Claims and passenger cards taken by the players are replaced.

At the end of the sixth phase, it is determined whether anyone met the victory condition for the scenario chosen.

Availability : The original Two Wolf version is long-since out of print, but the newer-released Mayfair has a wider distribution. The New Mexico expansion is available for the Two Wolf game, but the Mayfair version has the expansion included with the base game.

Expanded by:

Silverton New Mexico Expansion (Two Wolf version only, Mayfair version includes the expansion)




Eschnapur (2000)

Eschnapur (2000)

Ratings

5.72098 out of 10 with 195 ratings
Board Game Rank: 8723

Description

Eschnapur is a game where players explore an Indian temple and try to discover the secret treasures hidden within.

The game is a mixture of a variety of mechanisms; discovery chips, movement tiles, supply tiles and symbol cards. The game board shows a top-down view of the temple, showing a path through the temple off which are many niches holding the treasures. The pathway has stepping stones marked with a variety of symbols, one in front of each. To open the niche you must have the right symbol. To move around, you must spend footprint tiles. To obtain these, the player must reveal 2 supply tiles, keeps one and auctions the other. Players bid with anything they have, tiles, coins, cards.

Sounds confusing? It is. You must win auctions to get the stuff you need to win more auctions and move and open niches and collect treasures to score points to win the game. It might take a player a while to figure the true value of all of the items and how it all fits together, but once a player has the idea, the game really works.

The Reef (2000)

The Reef (2000)

Ratings

5.71042 out of 10 with 688 ratings
Board Game Rank: 6148
Family Game Rank: 1245

Description

After arranging the cards to form the reef, players roll dice to collect worms, spend worms to buy cards, use the cards to breed fish to win the game. You need to buy more boats to increase the columns on which you can fish. You need to buy reef cards (5 in total) on which you breed the parents, first to get 5 offspring wins. There are also pearl cards, which act as joker worms, and sharks, which eliminate cards by eating them.

There is a deck of offspring, 4 are dealt up, being combinations of the 5 colors. So there are blue green fish, pink yellow fish, purple purple fish. The parents are in the same colors, some male, some female. So, for example, to collect the blue green baby fish, you need a blue male and green female, or a blue female and green male. Any used cards go to the discard, which gets shuffled round and feed back into the reef. The cost of cards depends on their position on the reef, and there is a rule for flowing cards through past your boats.

The Reef is part of the Kosmos two-player series.

Blue Max (1983)

Blue Max (1983)

Ratings

7.1056 out of 10 with 730 ratings
Board Game Rank: 1493
War Game Rank: 226

Description

In Blue Max, each player pilots a WWI airplane in a dogfight. The game can be played as a campaign, with new planes becoming available as time passes, and with surviving pilots getting better at what they do.

Each plane has a maneuver sheet showing which ones it is allowed to do -- some maneuvers can only be executed by ace pilots, and other maneuvers are "restricted" in the sense that they can't be repeated from one turn to the next (the plane would stall).

If you "tail" another plane, its pilot must show you whether he's going right, left or straight ahead. You get to shoot ahead of your plane, unless you have a bomber with an observer/gunner in the back (swivel-mounted guns). Damage is rolled on a table that determines severity in terms of blue and red hits; you then draw the indicated number of coloued chits from a cup. Hits are taken to the wings, tail, engine, etc. There's a chance the pilot is killed, or that the plane catches fire.

Fuel eventually runs out and the pilots fly off to meet another day --if they survived.
This is a lot of fun with massive numbers of players; you can put the 20-odd planes on the map at once, balancing the better airplanes with weaker pilots.

The second edition introduced crude altitude rules, and in 1995 GDW put out full-blown miniatures rules.

The 2014 edition of Blue Max had substantial changes, and can be found with its own game page HERE.

Cartel (1973)

Cartel (1973)

Ratings

6.92117 out of 10 with 158 ratings
Board Game Rank: 3918
Strategy Game Rank: 1310
Family Game Rank: 962

Description

A Cartel, as used in this game, is an international collection of companies whose collective value is greater than the individual companies making up the combination. Beginning with a single company valued at 10 million dollars, you can build a cartel whose final value may approach or surpass one billion dollars within ten years (ten rounds of play). You can acquire one or more new companies each year, increasing your profits and the value of your unsold stock, making it possible to buy bigger and bigger companies as the game proceeds. Special bonus profits are gained whenever you buy companies situated adjacent to one another on the board, further increasing your rate of growth. By skillfully buying the right companies (using your cash, selling stock, and borrowing money with bonds), you win by having the cartel of greatest value at the end of the game.

The Big Cheese (1998)

The Big Cheese (1998)

Ratings

5.88351 out of 10 with 456 ratings
Board Game Rank: 5453
Family Game Rank: 1179

Description

An auction game in which players bid from their pool of "worker rats" to gain control of corporate projects. The workers from the winning bid are then are assigned to the project. Each turn, one worker is removed from each project. A project is complete once all workers have been removed. The value of a numbered project is only determined at completion by a die roll. Two other projects, Veto and The Big Cheese, allow special actions during the game. The game has two different scoring schemes, depending on whether players use a single six-sided die or a set of seven polyhedral dice.

This is part of the Hip Pocket Games series.

Awards

1999 Listed in GAMES Magazine's GAMES 100

Goldener Drache (1992)

Goldener Drache (1992)

Ratings

5.72656 out of 10 with 96 ratings
Board Game Rank: 9408

Description

A clever racing game from Wolfgang Riedesser of Ave Caesar fame. Players navigate flying dragons from North to South to reach the Golden Volcano. You start with a set of wind stones marked N, S, O, W, SO, and SW (Ost is German for East). You get a sloping rack in the shape of a dragon tail and at the start of the game pick the order for your wind stones on your rack, putting one stone underneath your own dragon at its starting position.

On your turn, you draw the bottom stone from your rack, place it (in the wind direction indicated) next to a dragon on the board, your dragon or another player's, and move the dragon onto your stone. The stone the dragon had been standing on goes to the top of your rack, to be used again when it rolls down eventually to the bottom.

You make three moves per turn and try to put the other dragons into tough situations while making progress with your own. So you generally want to play a North stone to move somebody else and the S, SO, and SW stones for your own dragon -- but there are blocks and corners, so this won't always be possible.

The main strategic tip is to try to move the dragons that have been left standing on stones with southward movement so as to get the S stones onto your own rack. You also have two Storm cards (to allow 5 moves instead of 3 on a turn) and two Lightning cards (to prevent another player trying to move your dragon) to deploy during the course of the game.

Although the structural underpinnings and the slight benefit of memory might make you think you're going to have a serious, thinking game, Goldener Drache actually plays out as very light and take-thatty for a fun 15 minutes and "Let's do it again!"

Die Verbotene Stadt (1992)

Die Verbotene Stadt (1992)

Ratings

6.18482 out of 10 with 112 ratings
Board Game Rank: 6785

Description

The Chinese Emperor has been powerless for a long time. Intrigue and corruption prevail within the city walls. Just before a wedding the ceremonial garments of the Emperor are stolen. How it happened is clear. A band of corrupt officials have exploited the waning power of the Emperor for themselves. The Emperor calls in his last faithful advisers (the players) and tells them "Return the garments to me no matter what!" The players heed the emperors request and try to find as many garment cards as possible.

Through the Desert (1998)

Through the Desert (1998)

Ratings

7.04362 out of 10 with 10641 ratings
Board Game Rank: 412
Abstract Game Rank: 15
Strategy Game Rank: 291

Description

Each player attempts to score the most points by snaking caravan routes through the desert, trying to reach oases and blocking off sections of the desert. Many people feel that it is reminiscent of Go.

Publisher's Description
From the award-winning game designer Reiner Knizia comes a game of strategy, patience, and cool plastic camels! The desert is still treacherous, mysterious, and without mercy. But for those willing to risk the dangers of the shifting, sun-baked sands, the desert holds riches beyond compare.
In Through the Desert, two to five players each control a tribe of nomads vying for control of the desert. By establishing caravans and taking over oases, the players gain points as their tribes increase in power.
Strategy is essential in deciding how and where to build your tribe's caravans. There are multiple ways to gain points and several ways to win. Should you try to build the longest caravan? Or should you dominate the desert's oases? Don't forget to keep an eye on your opponents' caravans, or you may find your own tribe cut off from valuable water holes.

Through the Desert is part of the so called Knizia tile-laying trilogy.

Dschungelrennen (1989)

Dschungelrennen (1989)

Ratings

6.175 out of 10 with 40 ratings
Board Game Rank: 9258
Children's Game Rank: 177

Description

Each player has a group of 5 animals in one color: crocodile, monkey, bear, tiger, elephant. They all race to gain the best places on the podiums.
There is a podium for each type of animal, with points for first, second and third arrivals. Once all the first positions of each podium has been taken the game is over. The player the most points, which is not necessarily the player with the most podiums, is the winner.

Movement is by dice which shows either one animal, two animals, or a joker. These reduce the thinking time a lot, as you have only a few choices to make, but still some choices to give the impressions that players are actually playing. In addition to that, certain spaces on the board allow for extra movement. Sometimes you may move an animal in the very back in order to gain some extra movements for the others.

Is a conga-line-style race, because only one animal can occupy one space, and the taken spaces don't count when you move your animal, which results in amazing jumps over other animals.

MARK (1997)

MARK (1997)

Ratings

5.97222 out of 10 with 54 ratings
Board Game Rank: 9502

Description

MARK is a game about collecting, processing, and reselling recycled components for a profit. Each turn, a player rolls a pair of color dice and chooses one of the showing die colors to perform an action with. Each color is tied to one type of recyclable material. A player can choose to receive a single new recyclable good to his delivery yard, or he can choose to move a single recyclable good from his delivery yard to his treatment area, or he can choose to sell one good from his treatment area to the market grid in the center of the board.

The market grid has 5 rows, and each row can hold only one variety of recyclable materials. When selling to the market, if it is the first time that good has been sold, the player may choose which row to sell into (left-most position in the row only), otherwise he must sell into the next empty space in the row that variety already occupies. He receives the amount of money shown on the space where he places his recyclable good. When the row is full, all goods of that type are removed from the game. The game ends when four of the market rows are completely filled.

If the player rolls both dice of the same color, he has no choice in which recyclable material to choose, but may perform two actions (delivery, treatment, or sale) with that type of good. In addition, there are two special symbols on the dice (one on each). One is a star symbol, which acts as a wild. The player can choose whatever color he desires. The other is a gavel, which triggers an immediate auction for the type of good shown on the other die, after which the player takes another turn. The auction is a closed-fist auction.

At the beginning of the player's turn, he must pay 5 dollars in storage fees if he has more than 2 recyclable materials in his delivery yard. He must also pay 5 dollars in storage fees if he has more than 2 recyclable materials in his treatment area. This provides tension between waiting for bigger pay-outs and selling recyclable materials early.

The player with the most money at the end of the game wins.

Arbos (1999)

Arbos (1999)

Ratings

6.37099 out of 10 with 332 ratings
Board Game Rank: 3577
Party Game Rank: 194
Family Game Rank: 907

Description

A manual dexterity game where players attempt to place wooden branches and leaves on a trunk that wobbles around. If you knock any leaves or branches off they go into your current pile of leaves and branches. First one to get rid of all their leaves and branches wins.

Vampire (2000)

Vampire (2000)

Ratings

5.89426 out of 10 with 563 ratings
Board Game Rank: 4767

Description

The goal of this game is to meld sets of vampires from the six different suits. Once either all the cards are drawn or one player has melds in all six suits, the game is over. The player (or players) with the weakest meld in each of the suits, and non-existent zero-melds count here, is discarded. However, all remaining cards contribute their value (either one or two) to each player's total.

Some have described this game as a multi-player version of Lost Cities, which isn't a terrible comparison.

Online Play


GameTable Online (real-time)


Part of the Goldsieber à la Carte line of games.

Dilemma (2000)

Dilemma (2000)

Ratings

4.004 out of 10 with 25 ratings
Board Game Rank: Not Ranked

Description

Curious combination of speed, dexterity and some bluff. The starting player puts a numbered card in an arena (a plastic dish). Players place or apparently throw numbered cards into the arena. If you do this correctly, so your card covers the opener neatly, you then duel with the starter. You each have a dueling block, showing peace or war. Lay this hidden, and reveal them together. Peace peace means the players swap the cards in the arena. War peace means war takes all the cards but loses 1 of 10 lives. War war means no-one gains cards and both lose a life. If you have no lives, you still duel, but can only place peace. When the game ends, total up the cards you won, most points win. Rules in German, English, French, Italian & Dutch.

Time Pirates (2000)

Time Pirates (2000)

Ratings

5.56369 out of 10 with 241 ratings
Board Game Rank: 10400

Description

Players are skipping through time to steal various artifacts from ancient civilizations. Each of the time periods have only two pathways, so travel is somewhat limited. When in an era, you can refill the tiles, collect tiles, or move on. However, the Time Police are also patrolling the time periods. If the Time Police catch you, they'll steal all the tiles of your largest collection of artifacts! After three rounds of collection, the player with the best collection wins.

Ave Caesar (1989)

Ave Caesar (1989)

Ratings

6.63729 out of 10 with 3857 ratings
Board Game Rank: 997
Family Game Rank: 249

Description

Set in a Roman Coliseum, players use cards to move their chariots around a quasi-variable track. The track itself has bottlenecks and lane-changing restrictions, which make the race interesting for the racers (very similar to Detroit-Cleveland Grand Prix or Daytona 500). Players are required to race three laps, and they must stop to 'Hail Caesar' before they can finish (a pit stop). The game is light, but if you waste too many moves taking the longer, outside-routes on corners, you may not have enough movement to finish the race. Later, the game was revamped into Ausgebremst, with the most notable changes being modular boards and options to reduce the luck.

The new Cafe Games/Pro Ludo edition has only 2 different tracks compared to the Ravensburger edition with 2 track variants on both sides of the board.

Aladdin's Dragons (2000)

Aladdin's Dragons (2000)

Ratings

6.93895 out of 10 with 2879 ratings
Board Game Rank: 753
Strategy Game Rank: 437
Family Game Rank: 155

Description

After the immediate response to Richard Breese's Keydom at Essen 1999, Hans im Glück Verlags-GmbH contracted to take the basic game idea and produce a version of the game. Aladdin's Dragons, or Morgenland in the original German, is the product of their cooperation.

The game features players putting numbered bidding chips face-down onto the board sequentially. After the players have placed all of their chips, then each of the areas is resolved. The bottom part of the board is where players attempt to gather treasure tokens, which is the overall currency of the game. The middle part of the board features a number of special actions, which help the players cast spells, trade in their resource tokens, or block other players' actions. The top part of the board is where players use treasure tokens to purchase artifacts, and the player who can collect the most artifacts by the end of the game will be the victor.

Won Games Magazine Game of the Year award in 2001.

Re-implements:

Keydom




Re-implemented by:

Aladdin's Dragons (card game version by same name as board game)




Microbadges: (Buy One)

Aladdin's Dragons fan




Web of Power (2000)

Web of Power (2000)

Ratings

7.30864 out of 10 with 3059 ratings
Board Game Rank: 453
Strategy Game Rank: 260

Description

Players struggle for influence over regions of Europe by placing two different type of control markers, Monasteries and Advisors. Monasteries are the basic placement, with the goal of securing a majority in a region or chain of monasteries or even decent points from second place. The placement of the Advisors is more restricted as the total number of Advisors in a region is limited by the majority player's number of monasteries. The game is played in two rounds and is very fast paced.

Online Play


http://www.boardgames-online.net (turn-based)


implemented bonus maps: China, Hellenia, Skandinavia, America, AD 850, Life on Mars, Big in Japan, Soviet Union


http://www.onlinebrettspiele.de/kuk/default.asp?l=en (Against AI)


Re-implemented by:


China


Expanded by:


Web of Power: The Vatican
Web of Power: The Duel


Warangel (2000)

Warangel (2000)

Ratings

7.6562 out of 10 with 236 ratings
Board Game Rank: 3677
War Game Rank: 917

Description

Warangel is a light, fantasy wargame, comprising now 120 warrior races, created and illustrated by Angelo Porazzi.
The first edition appeared in Italy in 1996 as a collectible game.
In 2000 the first boxed edition was produced and was awarded in 4 different italian luding Cons and Fairs:
Best Italian BoardGame in Ludex 2000 Bologna
BEST ITALIAN GAME in LuccaGames 2000, greatest luding fair in Italy
Best Italian Wargame in MilanoGames 2000
Best Self-produced game in AcquiComics 2001

From 2007 the game is available to satisfy gamers' requests with the service:
Create YOUR Warangel
well illustrated on official website http://www.warangel.it/WAbox.html

Now gamers may request their favourite RACES from any Generation already mounted on painted woodenblocks,
choose their favourite MAPS illustrating real sectors of Earth and receive your own customized copy of Warangel.
On website find plenty of pictures and samples.

All REFERENCE SHEETS and RULEBOOK are A4 format, fullcolor, in English.
MAPS are in A3 format, fullcolor.
All these materials are well protected in plastic folders.

In its first 15 years of life, Warangel reached thousands of gamers mostly in Italy but also in many countries all over the world.

Create YOUR Warangel

120 RACES available, choose your favourite from any Generation, already mounted on painted woodenblocks
120 REFERENCE SHEETS available in English or Italian
ALL Available hexed MAPS, representing real sectors of Earth




Integrates with:

Warangel Card Game
Warbeast




Pacal (1999)

Pacal (1999)

Ratings

6.19547 out of 10 with 86 ratings
Board Game Rank: 7279

Description

King Maya Pacal was born on March 26th 603 a.c. from Mrs. Zuc Kuk. Nobody knows Pacal’s real name. He was called Pacal in many writings in order to show everybody that he was a person because his armor was found after a war and in the Mayan language armor is called Pacal. This king had a throne and he was in charge for over 68 years. Now there has to be a successor, and the players have to build their pyramid. The greatest value has to be upside and the lowest has to be on the base ascendant sorted from left to right.

Who’s going to build his pyramid first and will be the new king?

Stake Your Claim (1985)

Stake Your Claim (1985)

Ratings

5.97234 out of 10 with 47 ratings
Board Game Rank: 10092

Description

A gold rush themed set collection game with a simple mechanic that enables swift play. There are two variants described, a 2-6 player game as well as a 2-player version outlined in the rules.

Broad appeal to children and adults due to the clear mechanics and straight-forward play.

The game utilizes 44 cards in 11 groups of four different images. Players build up their 'stash piles' by 'patenting' as many 'claims' as possible. This is accomplished by collecting sets in multiple stacks by drawing from a draw pile or common pool of 8 tiles in the center of the table based on matches and placing tiles into the pool if no match can be found.

Matches can also be made with the top card of piles of any other player. The end game comes when all cards are in the possession of the players, and the stacks are consolidated to determine who has the largest stack of claims.

The 2-player variant involves repeat-dealing of four cards to players when their hands are exhausted by set collection from the pool until all cards from the deck have been utilized.

Reimplemented by:

Räuber




Power (1981)

Power (1981)

Ratings

5.98961 out of 10 with 207 ratings
Board Game Rank: 6987
War Game Rank: 1853
Abstract Game Rank: 460

Description

One of the elements of Diplomacy that makes it so unique is the writing of orders for your pieces and then the simultaneous resolution of the move for everyone. Power uses this same general concept, only minus all the devil-inspired backstabbing that makes Diplomacy what it is. In this game, players are given equal forces consisting of ships, planes and other weapons of modern warfare, including a 'nuke' of sorts. Each turn, players can move a set number of their pieces based on the chosen piece's movement. The board is a painfully simple system of orthogonal squares. Once all moves for a given turn have been written down, all pieces are moved simultaneously. If more than one force's pieces occupy the same space, then a superiority check is made with each type of piece contributing a set number of strength points (usually inversely related to movement). The largest force then takes possession of all opposing pieces, making the shift in power quite significant, and the central theme for the remainder of the game.

Barnyard Buddies (1996)

Barnyard Buddies (1996)

Ratings

5.77984 out of 10 with 186 ratings
Board Game Rank: 8167
Children's Game Rank: 228

Description

In Barnyard Buddies, a bunch of cards depicting various animals in different colors are placed faceup on the table. Each turn, one player reveals a card that depicts four animals, each in a different color. All players race to figure out the animal and color not depicted on this revealed card, then grab the card on the table showing this colored animal combination.

This quick, mind-crushing exercise continues until the deck is depleted. Whoever collects the most cards wins!

Galloping Pigs (1992)

Galloping Pigs (1992)

Ratings

5.71712 out of 10 with 871 ratings
Board Game Rank: 5820
Family Game Rank: 1226

Description

Galloping Pigs is a cute little 'not-quite-a-children's-game' game where players are collecting points in the form of food. Plastic pigs are placed on a track made from cards laid in a circle, and then players are given cards in the colors of the pigs. Each turn, a player selects a card, and moves the corresponding pig one space forward. If the space in front is occupied by another pig, then the moving pig 'leapfrogs' that, and this can continue until the pig takes the lead, which gives the active player a food card. Play goes on like this until all cards for the round have been played, however in order to keep the food (points) you collect during a round, your final movement for the round must score some more food.

Ages 6 and up

Stratego Legends (1999)

Stratego Legends (1999)

Ratings

5.75518 out of 10 with 659 ratings
Board Game Rank: 6332
Customizable Rank: 162

Description

Stratego Legends takes the familiar game play of Stratego and expands it into something new. In addition to ranks, all pieces now have powers as well. Some fly, some teleport. Some perform better in the marshes or in the mountains. Others have powerful death curses that provide long-lasting effects to the battle. There are over 200 different pieces in the universe, each with its special function.
Stratego Legends is an "optionally collectible" game. Each box comes with a light army and a dark army whose pieces have been chosen to work well together. However, there are rules for customizing armies (and the lands they fight upon) to specialize your attack force. There are also rules for multiplayer games where 4, 6, or 8 players can square off as two teams.

Diplomacy (1959)

Diplomacy (1959)

Ratings

7.06391 out of 10 with 9973 ratings
Board Game Rank: 468
Strategy Game Rank: 352

Description

This classic game of pure negotiation has taken many forms over the years.

The first The Avalon Hill Game Co version has perhaps the widest release, but Avalon Hill Games, Inc. re-released the game in 1999, complete with a colorful new map and metal pieces. In 2008, Avalon Hill released a 50th anniversary edition with a new map and cardboard pieces representing the armies and navies.

In the game, players represent one of the seven "Great Powers of Europe" (Great Britain, France, Austria-Hungary, Germany, Italy, Russia or Turkey) in the years prior to World War I. Play begins in the Spring of 1901, and players make both Spring and Autumn moves each year. There are only two kinds of military units: armies and fleets. On any given turn, each of your military units has limited options: they can move into an adjoining territory, support an allied unit in an attack on an adjoining territory, support an allied unit in defending an adjoining territory, or hold their position. Players instruct each of their units by writing a set of "orders." The outcome of each turn is determined by the rules of the game. There are no dice rolls or other elements of chance. With its incredibly simplistic movement mechanics fused to a significant negotiation element, this system is highly respected by many gamers.

Avalon Hill Complexity rating - 3

Re-implemented by:

Colonial Diplomacy
Diplomacy: Classical Variant
Diplomacy: Hundred Variant




Sky Runner (1999)

Sky Runner (1999)

Ratings

5.57721 out of 10 with 364 ratings
Board Game Rank: 10430

Description

Players take on the role of cat burglars and use a simultaneous bidding mechanism similar to Raj/Hol's der Geier to get cards that allow them to move up a skyscraper. However, the game system does add several new features to the genre such as sabotage, stealing equipment, and unique "parasite" cards. In addition, the unique 3-d board is modular to allow for different difficulties and game lengths.

Carolus Magnus (2000)

Carolus Magnus (2000)

Ratings

6.85405 out of 10 with 3086 ratings
Board Game Rank: 815
Strategy Game Rank: 484

Description

This game uses a collection of smallish hexagon clusters arranged in a circle. Mercenaries, in the form of small wooden blocks, are placed onto the land pieces. Players can then use these blocks to attempt to gain control of the corresponding mercenary type, or place the same small blocks onto the board which can help the player who controls that color.

Once a player has majority of control markers on a piece of land, he can build a tower there. The tower serves as a semi-permanent control marker, as well as a way to win. If two land pieces are controlled by the same player, the land pieces are combined into one, which makes the position harder to take by the other players.

The first player to place a set number of towers wins the game, but the game can also end when the land masses are reduced to three or fewer, in which case the player with the most towers placed wins.

Bambuti (1999)

Bambuti (1999)

Ratings

5.9287 out of 10 with 115 ratings
Board Game Rank: 8005

Description

The Bambuti tribe has an annual competition where the villagers bring their most valuable family belongings--large, richly engraved wooden masks--which are constantly pushed back and forward among the participants until the sound of the jungle drums abruptly stops. Who has the most valuable mask?

The players play mask cards with different values and colors in front of them trying to capture the opponent's most valuable masks and gain the most points when the game ends.

Citadels (2000)

Citadels (2000)

Ratings

7.1418 out of 10 with 38361 ratings
Board Game Rank: 285
Strategy Game Rank: 243
Family Game Rank: 56

Description

In Citadels, players take on new roles each round to represent characters they hire in order to help them acquire gold and erect buildings. The game ends at the close of a round in which a player erects his/her eighth building. Players then tally their points, and the player with the highest score wins.

Players start with a number of building cards in their hand; buildings come in five colors, with the purple buildings typically having a special ability and the other colored buildings providing a benefit when you play particular characters. At the start of each round, the player who was king the previous round discards one of the eight character cards at random, chooses one, then passes the cards to the next player, etc. until each player has secretly chosen a character. Each character has a special ability, and the usefulness of any character depends upon your situation, and that of your opponents. The characters then carry out their actions in numerical order: the assassin eliminating another character for the round, the thief stealing all gold from another character, the wizard swapping building cards with another player, the warlord optionally destroys a building in play, and so on.

On a turn, a player earns two or more gold (or draws two building cards then discards one), then optionally constructs one building (or up to three if playing the architect this round). Buildings cost gold equal to the number of symbols on them, and each building is worth a certain number of points. In addition to points from buildings, at the end of the game a player scores bonus points for having eight buildings or buildings of all five colors.

The expansion Citadels: The Dark City was initially released as a separate item, but the second edition of the game from Hans im Glück (packaged in a tin box) and the third edition from Fantasy Flight Games included this expansion. With Dark City, Citadels supports a maximum of eight players.

The Broadway Game (1981)

The Broadway Game (1981)

Ratings

6.41726 out of 10 with 113 ratings
Board Game Rank: 6227

Description

In The Broadway Game, you're a producer engaged in the rough and tumble world of show business finance. You can take your shows out of town and come back a hit...or die on the road from bad reviews. Your investors can pull out or a union can strike your set. Your star can fall ill; you can sell the movie rights; or be rocked by scandal. It's Broadway...

The Broadway Game was invented in the late 1950's backstage in New York by Ernie Parmentier. Over the years it has become a cult hit, played in theater circles from New York to Hollywood. Now, in this new version presented by stage and screen star Mike Farrell, you can see what the excitement's all about!

Mr. President (1967)

Mr. President (1967)

Ratings

6.60018 out of 10 with 272 ratings
Board Game Rank: 3852
Strategy Game Rank: 1308

Description

Part of the 3M Bookshelf Series.

Mr. President is a highly realistic reenactment of the campaign events which lead to the election of the President and Vice-President of the United States. The two major political parties choose their candidates from a slate of possible nominees, each of whom possesses varying strengths and weaknesses. In their quest for victory, players feel the same frustrations and make the same decisions that confront actual candidates. Strategies which were intended to sweep a party into office may suddenly require a drastic change of tactics.

Mr. President includes Advanced Play rules covering Nominations, Advertising, Fund-Raising, Debates, and Incumbent Candidates.

In the 2-player game, one player controls the President and Vice President of a party.

In the 4-player game, two teams of candidates for President and Vice-President compete.

The 1967 or later copyright date differentiates this version from the earlier 1965/1966 release by 3M, which is an entirely different game.

NOTE:
There are significant differences between the 1967 version and the 1971 version.

Taj Mahal (2000)

Taj Mahal (2000)

Ratings

7.32915 out of 10 with 6263 ratings
Board Game Rank: 269
Strategy Game Rank: 175

Description

Northwest India at the beginning of the 18th century. The rule of the Grand Moguls is waning, and the Maharishis and princes seize the opportunity to take control of the region. By influencing the prominent forces, building magnificent palaces, and ensuring a steady supply of commodities, the princes increase their power until the most successful has won.

The goal of the game is to gain the most influence points. These can be obtained by building palaces and by acquiring commodities. A palace can be built after securing the support of the Vizier, the General, the Monk, the Princess, or the Grand Mogul. Commodities are gained by seizing control of a region or by retrieving them on a space where a palace has just been built.

There are twelve turns with an auction for the region control and the support of the Vizier, General, Monk, Princess, and Grand Mogul, each represented by a different symbol. Players use cards in four colors to bid for the various prizes, and each player may only play one color in any given turn. During your turn you can either increase your bid by playing more cards or withdraw. When you do, you gain the reward for every symbol you have the majority of. You place palaces, gain region tiles, and increase your score accordingly. There are bonus points for connecting palaces over several regions on the map.After the final area on the board is auctioned, the player with the highest point total wins the game.

This game is #3 in the Alea big box series.

Cold War (1984)

Cold War (1984)

Ratings

6.16111 out of 10 with 207 ratings
Board Game Rank: 5657
Strategy Game Rank: 1464

Description

A game for four players, Cold War gives you command of the economic, military, and intelligence forces of one of the contemporary world's major powers, and dares you to seize political, military, and economic control of as much of the world as possible. The only obstacles in your way are your three opponents, each of whom has a bag of dirty tricks to play and an equal stake in the world regions you claim for your own. Cold War is designed to be easy to learn, fun to play, and hard to win.

Olé! (1996)

Olé! (1996)

Ratings

6.581 out of 10 with 229 ratings
Board Game Rank: 3753

Description

The object of this simple card game is to rid yourself of your hand of cards. The deck consists of four suits, two have one through twelve cards, two have one through fifteen cards. The suits are ranked high to low, with the fifteen suits in the middle. Each turn, players have to play a card onto the last card played. In order for the play to be legal, the card played must be 'higher' in either suit or numeric value. If you play a card that beats the last card in both categories (suit and value), then you must play another card with the same restrictions. If you cannot play a card, then you take penalty. The first person to play his entire hand ends the hand, and everyone scores the value of the remaining cards in his hand. During subsequent hands, the player with the highest score (the current loser) can decide to reverse the suit order (mirror it) to make his hand better.

DungeonQuest (1985)

DungeonQuest (1985)

Ratings

6.69791 out of 10 with 2318 ratings
Board Game Rank: 1177
Thematic Rank: 258

Description

Players explore the ruins of Castle Dragonfire trying to reach the treasure chamber in the center of the dungeon and escape alive with as much treasure as possible. A limited number of turns before the game ends puts pressure on players to take risks and score rewards because anyone left in the dungeon when time runs out dies! A tile-laying system creates the maze-like dungeon and ensures that no two games are ever exactly the same.

Originally published as Drakborgen (Dragon's Keep) in 1985 by Brio AB. Sold in Norway (Skatten i borgen) and Denmark (Drageborgen). Licenced to Germany (Schmidt Spiele) as Drachenhort, to Great Britain (Games Workshop) as DungeonQuest. A 2nd edition named Drakborgen Legenden was released in 2002 (never released outside Sweden). The game was re-licensed to FFG in 2010, who released the 3rd edition the same year. See the family entry for more information.

Expanded by:

Drakborgen II (the Swedish expansion that upon Games Workshop's British release was split into the two below:)
Heroes for Dungeonquest
Dungeonquest: Catacombs




Re-implemented by:

Drakborgen Legenden
DungeonQuest (third edition)
DungeonQuest Revised Edition




!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Règles en français de la Version Games Workshop 1987 de DungeonQuest

+ Traduction française de la Feuille de Référence

https://sites.google.com/site/cyrunicorndungeonquest/home

Totem (1995)

Totem (1995)

Ratings

5.41553 out of 10 with 103 ratings
Board Game Rank: 11747

Description

from the rules summary from Game Cabinet:

This little village, the arena of our game, could be anywhere in the world. It could be in the jungles, in the savanna or in the mountains. Four families live here, and each attempts to garner the most prestige. The sign of power and status stands before each cottage: the totem pole - the taller the better.

The Totem animal is the proud Tschukka bird. Its meat has nourished innumerable generations in the village, and the shaman of the village use their bones to cast spells.

In this game about family generations you have one goal:

Your family should become the biggest and most reputable in the village and your totem pole must be the first to have all six parts.

Road to the White House (1992)

Road to the White House (1992)

Ratings

6.13286 out of 10 with 248 ratings
Board Game Rank: 5321
Thematic Rank: 710
Strategy Game Rank: 1485

Description

extrapolated from the preview:

The essence of the game is that you are moving from one to four pawns around the country, landing in cities, and scoring "votes" in the appropriate state which are proportional to the size of the city. Each turn, you move and add votes to the states you land in.

There are many complications that can occur. You can sit out a turn and collect money. With money, you can buy "organization" in a state, acting as a multiplier to all subsequent votes you get in that state. You can buy "advertising" - most useful in buying votes in piddly states that you're too busy to visit. You can buy "surrogates" which are additional pawns who may travel, garnering votes, just like your candidate. You can buy "special flights" that help you get to places without the luck of the dice.

The most characteristic part of the game comes in the "issues". Each player picks a politician with his own profile on how he stands on various issues. Then either through choice or chance cards, issues become "active". As long as the issue is active, politicians with a relevant stand will have bonuses or penalties when he visits certain states. The game strongly encourages role playing.

The climax of the game comes at the end, as you go down each state to see who has the most votes, thereby winning that state's delegates. There is a smart balloting system, in which the lowest scoring player drops out, giving his states' votes to the next strongest in each state. This continues, with players dropping out in each successive ballot until a winner is chosen.




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